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Full text of "Annual report of the city of Somerville"

CITY OF SOMERVILLE 



MASSACHUSETTS 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



1922 




SOMERVILLE PEESS PfflNT. 
1923. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Office of the City Auditor, 

January 15, 1923. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen i>f 
the City of Somerville. 

Gentlemen : — In accordance with the requirements of Sec- 
tion 3 of Ordinance Number 44, I herewith submit a report 
of the expenditures and receipts during the year 1922, showing 
in detail the appropriation and expenditures, and the receipts 
from each source of income. Also a statement of the funded 
debt and temporary loans, table relative to maturities and in- 
terest, a balance sheet showing the assets and liabilities at 
the close of the fiscal year and a statement of the treasurer's 
cash. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Howard E. Wbmyss, 

City Auditor, 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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Advance' to Poor Dept. . 
Advance, Soldiers' Benefits . 




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Taxes 1922 
Taxes 1921 
Taxes 1920 
Taxes 1919 
Taxes 1918 
Taxes 1917 








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CITY AUDITOR. 



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ANNUAL REPORTS. 

CASH STATEMENT, DECEMBER 31, 1922. 

REVENUE. 



Receipts. 



General: 



Taxes ...... 

Corporation, Bank and Income Taxes 
Licenses and Permits . 
Fines and Forfeits 
State, Vocational Schools . 
State, Americanization 
State, Commission on Blind 
State, Coutlinulation Schools 
State, Smith-Hughes Fund . 
State, Account Boston Elevated Hall 
way ...... 

County of Middlesex, Dog Licenses 
Sale of Fire House 
Miscellaneous .... 



Special Assessments 
Departmental : — 

General Government 

Protection of Persons and Property 

Health and Sanitation 

Highways 

Charities 

Soldiers' Benefits 

Schools 

Libraries 

Baths . 

Miscellaneous 



$2,847,915 18 

249,450 44 

12,943 59 

6,772 23 

8,273 44 

4,011 34 

600 00 

3,581 50 

2,459 34 

21,712 43 

2,053 71 

1,500 00 

132 07 





$3,160,405 27 


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61,090 17 


9,109 40 




2,812 15 




14,454 97 




9,992 98 




48,184 37 




11,915 50 




19,990 20 




2,348 57 




1,155 20 




655 00 





$120,618 34 



Water Department Accounts . 
Interest on deposits, taxes, etc. 
Temporary Loans 
Premium on Loans . 
Refunds ..... 

Total Receipts . 

Balance at beginning of period 



$276,826 12 
28,147 24 

1,758,000 00 

2,397 50 

21,796 60 

$5,429,281 24 
139,245 05 

$5,568,526 29 



CITY AUDITOR. 



CASH STATEMENT, DECEMBER 31, 1922.— Continued. 

Payments. 



Appropriations . 


$2,843,743 14 




Trust Funds Income . 


4,231 04 




Temporary Loans . 


1,843,000 00 




Oonim. of Massachusetts: — 






Taxes and Assessments 


462,303 00 




Fees ....... 


5 25 




County of Middlesex, Tax 


123,565 67 




Tax Titles 


762 84 




Real Estate Liens . 


15 55 




Tellers Overs and Snorts 


179 99 




Refunds ....... 


878 93 




Total Payments 




$5,278,685 41 


Transfer ito Non-Revenue . 




105,451 01 


(Balance on hand . 




184,389 87 




$5,568,526 29 


NON-REV EN I 


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Receipts. 






Funded Debt Loans 


$625,000 00 




Construction Bills Receivable . 


5,095 00 




Redemption of Tax Titles 


2,875 79 




Liquor License Fees for State 


3 76 






10,079 00 




Total Receipts .... 




$643,053 54 


Transfer" from Revenue 




105,451 01 


Balance at beginning of period 




21,989 15 




$770,493 70 


Payments. 






Appropriations .... 


$441,246 88 




Redemption of Tax Titles . 


2,875 79 


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Commonwealth of Masisacnusetlts, Fees 


3 75 




Total Payments 




$444,126 42 


Balance on (hand 




326,367 28 


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$770,493 70 


Summary. 






Total Revenue Receipts . 




$5,429,281 24 


Total Non4Revenue Receipts . 


643,053 54 




$6,072,334 78 


Total bal. at beginning of period 




161,234 20 




$6,233,568 98 


Total Revenue Payments 




$5,278,685 41 


Total Non-Revenue Payments 


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444,126 42 




$5,722,811 83 


Total balance on (hand 




510,757 15 




$6,233,568 98 



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ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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CITY AUDITOR. 






COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Payments. 

State Tax 

State Higthway Tax 
Non-Resident iBank Tax . 
Metropolitan Sewer Assessment . 
Metropolitan Park Assessment 
Wellington Bridge Assessment 
Wellington Bridge iSpecial Assessment 
Grade Crossings Assessment . 
Charles River Basin Assessment . 
Alewife Brook Assessment . 
Abatement of Smoke Assessment . 
Fire Prevention Assessment . 
Soldiers' Exemption Assessment . 
Poll Taxes 192,2 .... 
Liquor Licenses Fees 1921 
Liqulor License Fees 1922 
[Refund Account Foreign Corporation Tax 

1921 

Refund Account Domestic Corporation 

Tax 1921 . . . . 



94,620 


00 


396 


46 


4,025 


76 


96,065 


14 


61,386 


67 


1,910 


65 


1,442 


10 


4,678 


49 


8,923 


72 


1J083 


37 


403 


74 


1,066 


06 


286 


84 


87,114 


00 


5 25 


3 


75 



30 92 



33 70 



Total 


. 




$462,376 62 


Receipts. 






State Aid . . 


9,152 


00 


Military Aid . 


... 


2,70)3 


50 


Soldiers' Burials 


... 


60' 


00 


Income Tax 1922 


. . . . 


120,196 


40 


IncJome Tax 1921 


... 


18,406 


50 


Income Tax 1920 


. . . 


3,06)7 


75 


IniGoime Tax 1919 


... 


438 


25 


Mothers' Aid . 


... 


20,098 


30 


General Aild to Poor* 


10,557 


08 


Tuition State Wards 


3,100 


55 


Smith-Hughes Fund 


2,459 


34 


Vocationiail iSlchldoHs . 


&g273 


44 


Oonltlinuation ISdhool 


4,011 


33 


Americanization . . . - . 


3,581 


60 


Oomimissilon for Blind, Education . 


600 


00 


Account Deficit Boston Elevated Railway 


r 21,712 


43 


Boxing Licenses .... 


19 


84 


Corporation Taxes 1920 . 


193 


86 


Corporation Taxes 1921 . 


3,746 


08 


Corporation Taxes 1922 . 


70,051 


91 


Refund Poll Taxes 1921 . 


4,572 


00 


Refund Poll Taxes 1922 ... 


12,423 


00 


National^ Bank Tax 1921 . 


24 


45 


National Bank Tax 1922 . 


8,847 


89 


Street Railway Tax 1921 . 


176 


09 


Street Railway Tax 1922 . 


24,301 


26 


In Lieu of Taxes .... 


92 


75 


Diseases Dangerous 


to Health 


2,230 


47 



Total 



$355,097 97 



24 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 



County Tax 



Payment. 



$123,5G5 67 



Dog Licenses 



Receipt. 



$ 2,053 71 



STATEMENT OF RiEVENUE AND EXPENSES. 



Revenue. 

Total amount as per assessors commit- 
ments ...... 

Less State Taxes .... $198,942 22 

County Tax 123,565 67 

Poll Taxes for State .... 86,733 00 

Overlay 28,067 65 



$2,846,219 82 



Amount raised for municipal purposes 

Other Revenue: 

Commonwealth of Massadhusetlts 

Income Tax 1919, Excess 

Income Tax 1920, Excess 

Income Tax 1921, Excess 

Income Tax 1922 

Corporation Taxes 

National Bank Taxes . 

Account Boston Elevated Deficit 

Revenue from Taxes, Supplementary 

Warrants ...... 

Estimated Revenue . . $498,460 00 

Excess .... 59,849 77 



Transfer from Excess and Deficiency 



Expenses. 

General Appropriations . 
Ouitliay Appropriations . 
Metropolitan and Other Assessments 
Tellers Overs and Shouts 



Excess of Revenue 



$438 25 

3,067 75 

9,244 12 

120,196 40 

73,927 23 
8,872 34 

21,712 43 

771 81 

558,309 77 

50,000 00 



$2,844,026 41 

95,500 00 

176,246 78 

179 99 



$437,308 54 
$2,408,911 28 



846,540 10 
$3,255,451 38 



$3,115,955 IS 
$ 139,498 20 



CITY AUDITOR. 



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26 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



FUNDED DEBT. 

The total funded debt of the city January 1, 1922 was 
$1,003,500.00. New loans increased the debt during the year 
$625,000.00. Maturities paid reduced the debt $169,500.00. The 
net increase was $455,000.00 making the total debt December 
31, 1922 $1,459,000.00. Of this total only $16,000.00 is out- 
side the debt limit. 



Classified Debt January 1, 1922. 



Oity Loan 
Municipal Loan 
Sewer Loan . 
Pulblic Building Loan 
Highway Loan 
Bridge Loan . 
Emergency Loan 

Total within limit 
Sewer Loan 
MetropoLitan Park Loan 

Total outside limit . 

Total Funded Debt . 



$249,500 00 

15,000 00 

199,000 00 

230,000 00 

257,000 00 

28,000 00 

5,000 00 



12,000 00 
8,000 00 



$983,500 00 



$20,000 00 
$1,003,500 00 



Loans Increasing the Debt. 



Highway Loan 
Schoolhouse Loan 



Oity Loan 

Municiipal Loan 

Sewer Loans . 

Public Buildings Loan 

Highway Loan 

Bridge Loan . 

Extreme Ettnergjency Lolan 

Total within limit . 
Sewer Loan . 
Metropolitan Park Loan 

Total outside Dknit . 

Total Maturities 



50,000 00 
575,000 00 






$625,000 00 


rere as follows: 




$52,500 00 

8,000 00 

20,000 00 

19,000 00 

60,000 00 

1,000 00 

6*000 00 




'. 3,000 00 
1,000 00 


$165,500 00 




$4,000 00 




$169,500 00 



CITY AUDITOR. 



27 



Classified Debt December 31, 1922. 



City Bonds 3%% . 
City Bonds 4% 
City Bonds 4^4% . 
Municipal Bonds iVz% 
Sewer Bonds 3%% 
Sewer Bonds 4% . 
Sewer Bonds 4%% 
Public Buildings Bonds 4% 
Public Buildings Bonds 4%% 
Highway Bonds 4^% . 
Highway Bonds 4% 
Highway Bonds 3*4% 
Highway Bonds 5% 
Schoolhouse Bonds 4% .. 
Bridge Bonds 3%% . 



Total within limit . 
Sewer Bonds 4% . 
Metropolitan Park Bonds 3^% 



Total outslide limit 



Total Funded Debt . 



16,000 00 
171,000 00 

10,000 00 
7,000 00 

50,000 00 
108,000 00 

21,000 00 
146,000 00 

65,000 00 

28,000 00 
104,000 00 

30,000 00 

85,000 00 
575,000 00 

27,000 00 



$9,000 00 
7,000 00 



$1,443,000 00 



$16,000 00 
$1,459,000 00 



The total debt per capita December 31, 1922 is $15.04. 
The tax rate per $1,000 valuation on account of Reduct- 
ion of Funded Debt in 1922 was $1.92. 



TAXES. 

The total amount of taxable property as of April 1, 1922, 
not including non-resident bank shares, was $88,158,139.00. 
The tax rate 1 was fixed at $30.60 per $1,000 valuation. 



State Tax 

State Highway Tax 

Metropolitan Sewerage Assessment 

Metropolitan Park] Assessment 

Wellington Bridge Assessment 

Grade Crossings Assessment 

Charles River Basin Assessment 

Alewife Brook Assessment . 

Abatement of Smoke Assessment 

Fire Prevention Assessment 

County Tax 

N on-Resident Bank Tax 

City Budget . 

Overllay 

Total amount ratified 



194,520 


00 


396 


46 


9*5,065 


14 


61,386 


67 


3,352 


75 


4,678 


49 


8,923 


72 


1,083 


37 


403 


74 


1,066 


06 


123,565 


67 


4,025 


76 


2,974,70(5 


00 


28#67 


65 


$3,501,240 


48 



28 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Less Estimated Revenue . . . $498,460 00 

Appropriated from Excess and Deficiency 50,000 00 

State Income Tax, School Fund . . 81,292 40 

State Income Tax . ' . . . . 39,001 26 

Corporation Taxes .... 64,000 00 

National Bank Tax .... 9,000 00 
Poll Taxes, Proportional part for City 

Use 67,&22 00 



$799,575 66 
Net Amount Assessed in Taxes . $2,701,664 82 

Special Assessments. 

Street Sprinkling 45,199 56 



Amount oommlitted . . . $2,746,864 38 



CITY AUDITOR. 



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city AUDITOR. 



33 



BORROWING CAPACITY DECEMBER 31, 1922. 



Valuation 1920 
Supplementary 

Valuation 1921 
Supplementary 

Valuation 1922 
Supplementary 



Total 

Abatements 1920 

Abatements 1921 

Abatements 1922 



Average valuation for three years . 

Two and one-half per cent 

Present debt within limit .... 

Borrowing capacity December 31, 1922 
Less Schoolhouse Loan Authorized . 



Maturities: — 

January 1, 1923 

April 1, 1923 . . 
July 1, 1923 . $40,500 00 
Less Outside Limit . 4,000 00 
October 1, 1923 



$83,910,855 60 
17,700 00 



86,718,289 60 
75,258 00 



88,158,139 27 
8,400 00 



$83,928,555 60 



$86,793,547 60 



493,150 00 
626,258 00 
358,500 00 



$88,166,539 27 
$258,888,642 47 



1,477,908 00 

$257,410,734 47 

$85,803,578 16 

2,145,089 45 

1,443,000 00 

$702,089 45 
300,000 00 

$402,089 45 



$18,000 00 
92,000 00 

36,500 00 
15,000 00 



$161,500 00 



$563,589 45 



34 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

ABATEMENTS SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS PRllOR YEAR. 

Charges : 

Street Sprinkling 1921 .... $14 82 

Credit : 
Excess and Deficiency .... 14 82 



WATER CHARGES 1921, REFUNDED OR ABATED. 

Charges : 
Metered 1921 ." . . . . $11 45 

Annual 1921 3 54 

$14 99 

Credit : 
Excess and Deficiency .... 14 99 



TELLERS OVERS AND SHORTS 

Charges : 

Shortages $179 99 

Credit: 
Excess and Deficiency .... 179 99 



STATE INCOME TAX 1919 
Credit : 

Cash from Commonwealth . . . $438 25 

Charges : 

To Revenue 1922 ..... 438 25 



STATE INCOME TAX 1920 
Credit : 

Cash from Commonwealth . . . $3,067 75 

Chs.rsres * 

To Revenue 1922 $3,067 75 



STATE INCOME TAX 1921 
Credit: 
Cash from Commonwealth . . . $18,406 50 

Charges : 

Balance from 1921 account . . . $9,162 38 

To Revenue 1922 9,244 12 

$18,406 50 



STATE INCOME TAX 1922 
Charges : 

Estimate Account General School Fund 81,292 40 

Estimate Account General Purposes . 39,001 26 

$120,293 66 

Credits : 
Cash from Commonwealth . . . $120,196 40 

Revenue 1922 97 26 

$120,293 66 



CITY AUDITOR. 35 

CORPORATION TAXES. 

Credits: 
Cash, Commonwealth, Account 1920 $193 86 

Commonwealth, Account 1921 . 3,746 08 

Commonwealth, Account 1922 . > 70,051 91 

$73,991 85 

Charsres * 

" Estimate for 1922 ..... 64,000 00 

Refund to Commonwealth ... 64 62 

To Revenue 1922 . . . . . 9,927 23 

$73,991 85 

NATIONAL BAiNK TAXES. 

Estimate 1922 $9,000 00 

Credits : 

Cash, Commonwealth, Account 1921 . 24 45 

Commonwealth Account, 1922 . 8,847 89 

Revenue 1922 127 66 

$9,000 00 

TAX TITLES. 

Charges : 

Balance from 1921 account . . . 2,478 51 

Taxes for 1921, titles owned by city . 750 84 

Title purchased 12 00 

$3,241 35 

Credit: 

Cash 77 27 

Balance to 1923 account . . $3,164 08 

REAL ESTATE LIENS. 

Charges: 

Balance from 1921 account . . . $193 88 

Taxes 1921 15 55 

$209 43 

Credit: 

Cash 135 00 

Balance to 1923 account .... , $74 43 

GRADE CROSSING ADVANCES. 

Charges : 

Balance from 1921 account . . . $427 30 

SALE OF LAND AND BUILDINGS, MARSHALL STREET. 

Credit: 

Cash Deposit $1,500 00 

TAJ LINGS. 

Credit: 

Balance from 1921 account . . . $291 65 

PREMIUMS ON BONDS. 

Credits: 

Cash, Loan of April 1, 1922 $975 00 

" Loan of October 2, 1922 . . 1,422 50 

$2,397 50 



36 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

ACCRUED INTEREST ON BONDS. 

Credits : 

Cash, Loan of April 1, 1922 . . . 2,291 67 

" Loan of October 2, 1922 . . Ill 11 

$2,402 78 

Charges: 
General Appropriations . . . 2,291 67 



Balance to 1923 account . $111 11 

REVENUE RIROM TAXES), SUPPLEMENTARY WARRANTS. 

Credits : 

Balance from 1921 account . 
Supplementary Warrant, No. 1 . 
Supplementary Warrant, No. 2 . 
Charged to Commonwealth, on account 

of Abated Polls of 1921 . 

Account Abated Polls of 1922 

Charges : 

Abatements 

Credit to Commonwealth, — account 

Polls 1922 .... 

To Revenue 1922 .... 



Balance to 1923 account . $528 66 

REDEMPTION OF TAX TITLES. 

Credit: 

Cash received $2,875 79 

Charges : 

Cash paid, titles redeemed . . . 2,875 79 

s 
OVERLAY ACCOUNTS. 

Overlay 1917. 

Credit: 

Balance from 1921 account . . $772 20 

Charges : 

Abatements 6 00 



$823 65 
635 00 
257 04 




' 136 00 
63 00 


$1,914 69 




$233 22 




'. 381 00 
771 81 


$1,386 03 





Balance to 1923 account . . $766 20 

Overlay 1918. 

Credit: 

Balance from 1921 account . . . $143 52 

Charges : 

Abatement 2 00 



Balance to 1923 account . . . $141 52 

Overlay 1919. 
Credit: 

Balance from 1921 account . . . $326 29 

Charges : 

Abatements 437 58 



Debit Balance to 1923 account . $111 29 



CITY AUDITOR. 37 

Overlay 1920. 
Credit: 
Balance from 1921 account . . . $1,988 16 

Charges : 

Abatements • 981 03 

Balance to 1923 account . . $1,007 63 

Overlay 1921. 

Credit: 

Balance from 1921 account . . . $6,310 83 

Charges to Commonwealth account 

Polls Abated 3,070 00 

$9,380 83 

Charges : 

Abatements 5,777 62 

Balance to 1923 account . . . $3,603 21 

Overlay 1922. 

Credit: 

Taxes 1922 $28,067 65 

Charges to Commonwealth account 

Polls Abated 13,559 00 

$41,626 65 

O fl 3.1* 2TP S " 

Abatements 26,423 10 



Balance to 1923 account . . . $15,203 55 

RESERVE FUND, SURPLUS FROM OVERLAY. 

Credit: 

Balance from 1921 account . . . $3,356 45 



EXCESS AND DEFICIENCY 

Credits : 

Balance from 1921 account . 
Refund account Soldiers' Relief 1921 
Adjustment of charges to Common 

wealth on Soldiers' Benefits 1921 
Revenue Excess 1921 

Charges : 

Transfer to reduce tax levy . 
Abatements Special Assessments Prior 

years 

Water Charges 1921 abated . 
Interest on Tax Sale 
Liquor Licenses Pees 1921 . 



Balance to 1923 account 



$60,273 37 
204 00 

92 00 
139,498 20 


$200,067 57 
$50,061 68 


$50,000 00 

14 82 

14 99 

26 62 

5 25 






$150,005 89 



38 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

CLASSIFICATION OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES, 



Receipts. 



General Revenue: 

Taxes: — 

Taxes 1922 

Taxes 1921 

Taxes 1920 

Taxes 1919 

Taxes 1918 



From State: — 
Corporations 1920 
Corporations 1921 
Corporations 1922 
National Bank 1921 
National Bank 1922 
Street Railway 1921 
Street Railway 1922 
Income 1919 
Income 1920 
Income 1921 
Income 1922 
Excise Tax, Ship Owners 



$2,409,023 


15 


438,447 


62 


387 


41 


33 


80 


23 


20 


193 


86 


3,746 


08 


70,051 


91 


24 


45 


8,847 


89 


176 


09 


24,301 


26 


438 


25 


3,067 


75 


18,406 


50 


120,196 


40 


39 


32 



Licenses and Permits 

Licenses: — 

Amusements .... 
Dealers in Motor Vehicles 

Junk 

Milk 

Pool billiards and bowling . 
Sunday . . . . 
Innholders and Victuallers . 

Pedlers 

All other 

Permits: — 

Marriage 

Buildings .... 

Electrical .... 

All other ..... 

Fines and Forfeits 

Court Fines ... 

Departmental Penalties 

Tax Titles Sold to Individuals 



1,107 


00 


375 


00 


775 


00 


422 


50 


336 


00 


655 


00 


152 


00 


959 


00 


451 


75 


1,131 


00 


2,641 


50 


2,804 


00 


1,114 


00 


5,520 


96 


174 


00 


77 


27 



Grants and Gifts 

From State: — 

Vocational Schools 
Continuation School 
Americanization. 
Blind 



8,273 44 

4,011 34 

3,581 50 

600 00 



Carried forward 



16,466 28 



CITY AUDITOR. 



39 



nought forward 


16,466 28 


Smith-Hughes Fund 


2,459 34 


Deficit Boston Elevated Ry. 


21,712 43 


Boxing Licenses .... 


19 84 


From County: — 




Dog Licenses .... 


2,053 71 



All Other General Revenue 

Deposit, Sale of Land and Buildings 
State, in Lieu of Taxes . 



1,500 00 
92 75 



Total General Revenue 


$3,160,405 27 


Commercial Revenue — Special Assessments 




For Expenses: — 




Street Sprinkling 1922 .... 


$37,492 94 


Street Sprinkling 1921 .... 


7,971 73 


For Outlays: — 




Sewers 1922 


1,090 61 


Sewers 1921 


1,488 35 


Sidewalks 1922 


3,071 40 


Sidewalks 1921 


5,057 32 


Sidewalks 1920 


1,143 67 


Street Betterments 1921 


3,554 93 


Street Betterments 1920 


219 22 


Total Commercial Revenue — Spe- 




cial Assessments 


$61,090 17 


Commercial Revenue — Departmental. 


General Government 




Treasurer and Collector . . 


$6,350 76 


Assessors 


2 25 


City Clerk 


1,636 80 


Engineering 


19 59 


Commissioner of Buildings . 


1,100 00 


Protection of Persons and Property 


• 


Police Department: — 


1 


Cloth .... 


351 70 


Rent of Court Room .... 


1,175 00 


All Other 


319 99 


Fire Department: — 


! 


(Sale of Old Materials .... 


266 00 


Sealer of Weights and Measures . 


649 89 


'Electrical Dept., Sale of Old Car . 


50 00 


Health and Sanitation 




Contagious HospitaJl 


6j/759 27 


Health Department . • . 


386 93 


Insipeotdon ...... 


335 10 


Sale of auto ...... 


320 00 


Sanitary Department : — 




Garbage 


2^603 45 


Sale of equipment .... 


3,739 79 


Sanitary Buildings, rent 


272 81 


Sewer Buildings 


37 62 



Carried forward 



14,454 97 



40 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward 

Highways: 
Laibor and Materials 
Sidewalks: — 

Malintomance 

Outlay . 
Street Sprinkling 
Rent of Tenements . 

Charities 

Almshouse: — 

Sale of produce, etc. 

Board 
Outside Relief: — 

Individuals . 

Cities and Towns 

State 
Mothers' Aid: — 

Cities and Towns 

State 



Soldiers' Benefits 

State Aid .... 

Military Aid .... 
Soldiers' Burials 

Education 

Tuition State Wards 

Other Tuition .... 

Rent High School Hall . 

School Buildings, Miscellaneous 

Sale of Buildings . 

School Telephone . 

Libraries 
Fines, Lost Books, etc. . 

Recreation 

Park Buildings 

Shower Baths .... 

Bathhouse .... 

Unclassified 

Electrolysis .... 
Real Estate Liens . 



Total Commercial Revenue — De- 
partmental . 



14,454 97 

9,422 46 

62 28 
24& 24 

12 00 
240 00 



$2,785 16 
3,692 55 

267 85 

8,127 66 

10,557 08 

2,655 77 
20,098 30 



9,152 00 
2,703 50 

60 00 



3,100 55 

14,904 07 

1,077 00 

306 56 

550 00 

52 02 



2,348 57 

20 00 
456 60 
698 60 



500 00 
135 00 



$120,618 34 



Commercial Revenue — Public Service Enterprises 
Water Department 



Sale of Water :- 
Metered 1922 
Metered 1921 
Annual 
Additional 

Carried forward . 



$207,594 72 

26,272 54 

27,643 75 

1,093 29 

262,604 30 



CITY AUDITOR. 



41 



Brought forward 

Service Assessments 

Maintenance Bills 

Total Commercial Revenue — 
Public Service Enterprises 

Commercial Revenue — Interest 

Deposits 

Taxes 

Special Assessments 

Miscellaneous 

Trust Funds: — 

School 

Library 

Poor 

Total Commercial Revenue In- 
terest 



262,604 


30 




9,674 


58 




4,547 


24 






$276,826 12 


$11,885 


23 




14,873 


39 




193 


46 




35 


30 




228 


00 




856 


81 




75 


05 






$28,147 24 



Municipal Indebtedness 

Temporary Loans: — 
Anticipation of Revenue 

General Loans: — 

Highway 

Schoolhouse 

Premiums on Loans 

Total Municipal Indebtedness . 

Agency, Tru^t and Investment 

Redemption of Tax Titles . . . 
Liquor Licenses for State . 

Total Agency, Trust and Invest- 
ment . 



$1,758,000 00 




50,000 00 

575,000 00 

2,397 50 






$2,385,397 50 


$2,875 79 
3 75 









$ 2,879 54 



Refunds 

Appropriations . 
Soldiers' Benefits 1922 
Soldiers' Benefits 1921 
Accrued Interest 

Commonwealth : — 

Poll Taxes 1921 

Poll Taxes 1922 
Boston Elevated Railway, 
Sale of Buildings 

Total Refunds 

Total Receipts 



Paving 



742 82 
1,452 00 

204 00 
2,402 78 



4,572 00 
12,423 00 
10,079 00 

5,095 00 



$ 36,970 60 
$6,072,334 78 



42 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



EXPENDITURES 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Board of Aldermen Expenses 



Expenses 



Outlays 



Books, postage and supplies 
Printing and advertising 
Refreshments . . 
Badges . . . " . 
All other . 


$44 

80 

1,019 

88 

38 


00 
00 
20 
20 
75 


$1,270 15 








Clerk of Committees Department 






Salaries and Wages: — 








Clerk .... 
Assistant Clerk . 


2,100 
700 


00 
00 




Other Expenses: — 








Books, postage and supplies 
Printing and advertising 
Telephone .... 
All other 


39 

4 

92 

15 


49 
25 
10 
00 


2,950 84 






Executive Department 








Salaries and Wages: — 








Mayor .... 
Secretary 
Clerks 


4,000 
1,475 
1,0S3 


00 
34 
83 




Other Expenses: — 








Books, postage and supplies 
Printing and advertising 
Telephone .... 
Inauguration Expenses 
Contingent expenses . 
All other .... 


226 
179 
150 

81 
226 

35 


55 
75 
08 
00 
19 
03 


7,457 77 








Auditing Department 








Salaries and Wages: — 








Auditor .... 
Clerks 


3,100 
1,902 


00 
66 





Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and supplies 159 24 

Printing and advertising . 560 52 

Binding .... 52 00 

Telephone .... 40 29 

All other .... 19 56 



Special Item: — 
Typewriter 



81 25 



5,915 52 



CITY AUDITOR. 



Treasury Department 
Salaries and Wages: — 

Treasurer and Collector 

Deputy Collector 

Cashiers 

Clerks .... 



4,000 00 
2,000 00 
2,539 50 
8,349 42 



Expenses 



43 

Outlays 



Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and supplies 

Printing and advertising 

Telephone 

Bonds . 

Car Fares 

Car hire 

All other 



2,406 54 

1,007 29 

144 50 

386 57 

26 90 

12 00 

66 83 



Special Item: — 
Coin changer 



Assessors' Department 
Salaries and Wages: — 



107 80 



Certification of Notes and Bonds 
Certifying .... 1,180 00 



21,047 35 



Chairman .... 
Assessors .... 
Assistant Assessors 
Clerks (Office) . 
Clerks (Street) . 


2,800 
4,800 
1,500 
7,371 
500 


00 
00 
00 
41 
00 






Other Exipensesi: : 










Books, postage and supplies 
Printing and advertising . 
Carfares, auto hire, etc. 
Telephone .... 
All other .... 


1,008 78 

2,937 52 

18 65 

39 11 

80 63 


21,056 


10 








Board of License Commissioners 










Salaries and Wages: — 

Inspector .... 
Clerk 


200 
200 


00 
00 






Other Expenses: — 










Books, postage and supplies 
Printing and advertising . 


46 
25 


10 
75 


471 


85 


Pedlers' License Commission 






Books, postage and supplies 


20 


93 


20 


93 



1,180 00 



44 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Expenses 



Outlays 



City Clerk's Department 
Salaries and Wages: — 



City Clerk .... 


3,500 00 


Assistant City Clerk . 


1,800 00 


Clerks 


3,078 96 


Other Expenses: — 




Books, postage and supplies 


589 41 


Printing and advertising . 


79 31 


Binding 


39 74 


Telephone .... 


132 29 


All other 


34 47 



Registration of City Laborers 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Registration Clerk 

Other Expenses: — 
Stationery and postage 
Printing .... 
All other .... 



Law Department 

Salaries and Wages: — 
City Solicitor 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and supplies 

Printing and advertising 

Recording 

Clerical Hire 

Witness Fee, Etc. 

Telephone 

All other 



City Messenger's Department 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Messenger . 
Other Expenses: — 

Stationery and postage 

Printing and advertising 

Auto Maintenance 

Telephone 

Carfares 



Engineering Department 

Salaries and Wages: — 
City Engineer 
Assistants 
Clerks . . . . 

Carried forward 



400 00 



19 20 
4 50 

1 75 



2,700 00 



38 


59 


4 


00 


60 


03 


156 


00 


111 


73 


20 


00 


37 


45 



2,200 00 





3 00 

5 25 

634 65 

24 27 

13 20 


♦ 


4,000 00 
7,317 54 
1,103 00 


. 


12,420 64 



9,254 18 



425 45 



3,127 80 



2,880 37 



CITY 


AUDITOR. 


Expenses 


Brought forward 


12,420 64 




Other Expenses: — 






Supplies, printing, postage 


132 25 




Telephone .... 


130 05 




Auto maintenance 


697 02 




Instruments and equipment 


27 04 




Carfares .... 


131 46 




All other .... 


63 70 


13,602 06 



Public Buildings Department, Com- 
missioner of Public Buildings 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Commissioner . . . 3,100 00 

Inspector of Plumbing . 1,900 00 

Clerks 2,152 93 

Other Expenses: — 



Books, postage and supplies 
Printing and advertising . 
Telephone .... 
Auto maintenance 
All other .... 


215 96 
129 75 
178 61 
620 00 
45 15 


pecial Items:— 




Inspection elevators . 


77 60 



Public Buildings Department, Main- 
tenance Municipal Buildings 
©alarfies and (Wages: — 

Janitors .... 5,170 97 

Labor 826 19 

Other Expenses: — 

Fuel and Light . . . 3,160 58 

Furniture and Furnishings 1,058 07 

Janitors Supplies . . 310 21 

Repairs to Buildings . . 358 39 
Heating apparatus and 

equipment . . . . 210 10 

Plumbing and supplies . 142 97 

Hardware and materials . 58 79 

Ice 281 35 

All other .... 4 48 



City Planning Board 
Clerical Work ... 10 00 



Election Expenses, City Clerk 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Clerks 600 00 



45 

Outlays 



8,420 00 



11,582 10 



10 DO 



Carried forward . . . 600 00 



46 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward 



600 00 



Expenses 



Outlays 



Other Expenses: — 




Equipment, supplies, sta 




tionery and postage 


409 21 


Printing and advertising 


302 53 


Carfares and auto hire 


275 00 


Refreshments 


16 25 


All other . 


3 26 



Election Expenses, Registrars 'of Voters 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Registrars .... 1,210 00 

Clerks 297 00 

Clerical hire . . . 1,801 00 



Other Expenses: — 




Stationery and postage and 




supplies . 


181 62 


Printing and advertising . 


1,239 36 


Refreshments 


18 00 


Car hire . 


44 00 


Registers . 


64 68 


All other . 


75 



Election Expenses, Pay of Election Officers 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Wardens .... 460 00 

Inspectors .... 1,764 00 

Clerks 460 00 



Public Building Department, Maintenance 
Polling Places 

Labor 57 71 



Teaming .... 
Lumber .... 
Hardware and materials 
Fuel and Light 
Repairs Buildings . 
Rent Halls 

Special Item: — 

Boxes .... 

Police Department 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Chief .... 
Captains and Lieutenants 
Sergeants and Inspectors . 
Patrolmen 
Special Police 
Matrons 
Other Employees 

Carried forward 



66 00 
39 40 
29 67 
190 78 
223 91 
70 00 

31 61 



3,000 


00 


11,700 


00 


12,300 


00 


152,702 


26 


1,975 


05 


989 


20 


5,050 


50 



1,606 25 



4,856 41 



2,684 00 



709 08 



187,717 01 



CITY AUDITOR. 



Brought forward . . . 187,717 01 

Equipment and Repairs: — 
Motor cycle and auto main- 
tenance .... 2,443 61 
New equipment ... 1 50 
Equipment for men . . 452 03 
All other .... 12 25 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, printing, postage and 

supplies . . . . 371 08 

Care of prisoners . . . 112 83 

Telephone .... 373 52 

Laundry .... 51 92 

Travel and disbursements . 234 65 
Reimbursement for injuries, 

etc 98 50 

Convention Expenses . . 60 00 

All other .... 51 67 
Special Items: — 

Auto 1,205 00 



Public Buildings Department, 


Maintenance 


Police Buildings 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Janitors .... 


1,961 19 


LaJbor 


246 90 


Maintenance of Buildings: — 




Fuel and light 


1,897 25 


Janitors supplies . 


111 99 


Furniture and furnishings ; . 


103 85 


Repairs 'to 'buildings, . 


491 35 


Heating apparatus and 




equipment 


1,118 82 


Plumbing and supplies 


52 06 


Hardware and materials 


70 46 


Ice ..... 


37 71 


All other .... 


51 47 


Special Item: — 




Exterminating ants 


215 00 


Fire Department 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Chief Engineer . 


3,000 00 


Assistant Engineers 


2,500 00 


Firemen .... 


207,886 75 


Horses and care of same: — 




Hay, grain and straw. 


917 11 


Shoeing. .... 


492 35 


Medicine and veterinary . 


34 03 



Expensea 



47 

Outlays 



193,185 57 



6,358 05 



Carried forward 



214,830 24 



48 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Expenses 



Brought forward 


214,830 24 


Harnesses^ cloth wig and 




18 00 


All other 


16 60 


Equipment and Repairs: — 




Apparatus and equipment . 2,330 37 


Hose .... 


2,823 88 


Equipment for men . 


301 96 




9 69 


Hardware, tools, etc. . 


249 42 


Other expenses: — 




Books, printing, postage and 


supplies 


17 45 


Telephone 


584 05 


Janitors supplies . 


331 87 


Furnishings . 


13 21 


Laundry work 


464 42 


Ice 


100 46 


All other 


32 64 


Supplies: — 




Grease and oil 


377 11 


Gasoline 


1#60 85 


Soda and acid 


198 74 


All other 


175 56 


Special Items: — • 


, 


Auto for chief 


1,855 63 


Auto for Deputy Chief 


1,423 00 


P. L. Lowell claim 


2,450 00 




1 229,865 05 



Outlays 



Public Building Department, Maintenance 
Fire Buildings 



Salaries and Wages: 1 — 






1,246 16 


Otiher Expenses: — 




Fuel and light . 


7,915 87 


Furniture and furnisnings . 


395 66 


Janitors' supplies 


48 34 


Repairs to buildings . 


2 % 621 98 


Heating apparatus and 




equipment .... 


1,870 83 


Plumibing supplies 


736 09 


Hardware and materials . 


597 73 


All other .... 


73 88 


Special Item: — i 




Removing bell 


290 00 



16,696 64 



CITY AUDITOR. 



Weights and Measures 

Salaries and Wage's: — 
iSealer 

Other Expenses: — 
Books, stationery and ipost- 

age .... 
Printing and advertising 
Equipment and supplies 
Telephone . . 
Auto maintenance 
All other 



1,800 00 



21 


05 


22 


25 


90 


40 


32 


86 


216 


42 


30 


91 



Expenses 



49 

Outlays 



Special Item: — 
New auto 



377 00 



Electrical Department 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Goimimlisisioneir 


2j600 00 


Clerk . v . 


988 00 


Lalbor .... 


12,164 2S 


Other Expenses: — 




Fire Alarm System 


1,505 09 


Police Signal System . 


279 21 


Ajuto maintenance 


989 80 


Equipment and repairs 


19 00 


Telephone . 


128 21 


Books, printing, postage 




and supplies 


177 23 


All other . 


64 73 



2/590 89 



18,915 52 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
Electrical Department Bldgs. 

Janitor 880 00 

Fuel 20« 12 

Light . 139 68 

Furniture and furnishings . 134 44 

Hardware and materials . 4 26 

Plumbing 12 10 

Janitors supplies . . . 9 07 



Underground Construction 
CaMe .... 
Express 



446 48 
11 50 



1,387 66 



$457 98 



50 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Expenses 



Outlay* 



Highways, Suppression of Moths 

Labor 

Books, piUnting, postage 
Hired teams and trucks . 
iBardware % |ools and equip- 
ment 
Insecticides .... 
Other materials and supplies 
All other 



3,600 51 


49 


25 


146 


35 


181 


65 


144 46 


65 


97 




35 



4,188 54 



Highway Department, Care of Trees 
Lfcibor 4,371 46 



Teams and trucks . 


626 17 


Equipment and tools 


44 68 


Lumber and materials . 


227 70 


Use of steam roller 


42 00 



5,312 01 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 



Health Department 

General Administration: — 

Agent . 

Clerks .... 

Medical Inspector and Bac 
teriologist . 

Health Nurses 

Books, printing, and post- 
age .... 

Carfares, etc. . 

Telephone 

All other 

Quarantine and Contagious 
Diseases: — 

Board and Treatment: — 

Cities and Towns 
Other Institutions 



$1,600 00 

2,788 00 

2,500 00 

3,213 64 

399 55 

235 62 

321 25 

46 75 



1,009 45 
134 25 



Expenses 



Outlays 



Tuberculosis : — 

Board and Treatment: 

Cities and towns . . 4,222 32 

State 3,075 00 

Other Institutions . . 961 16 

Groceries and provisions 855 27 

All other .... 12 25 

* 

Carried forward . . . 21,374 51 



CITY AUDITOR. 



Brought forward 

Other Expenses:. 

Equipment and supplies 
Auto maintenance 
Burying dead animals . 
All other 

Special Items: — 
New AmibulaiDce . . 



Expenses 



21,374 51 




197 65 
619 06 

84 25 
5 19 




2 200 00 


24,480 66 



51 
Outlays 



City Clerk's Department, Vital Statistics 

Canvassing and reporting 

births .... 752 40 

Reporting deaths ... 51 00 

Printing and advertising . 127 50 



930 90 



Contagious Hospital 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Matron .... 
Medical attendance 
Nurses and other help 

Other Expenses: — 

Drugs and medicines 
Bedding, dry goods 

clothing 
Groceries and provisions 
Equipment and supplies 
Telephone 
Electric power 
All other 



and 



1,119 36 

90 00 

7,968 96 



62 72 



303 60 




5,071 52 




1,344 11 




82 22 




105 18 




61 33 







16,204 00 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 

Contagious Hospital 
Salaries and Wages: — 
Janitor and labor . . 559 30 



Other Expenses: — 




Fuel 


1,599 78 


Light 


428 38 


Janitors' supplies 


49 00 


Furniture and furnis'nings . 


111 35 


Repairs -to buildings . 


281 80 


Heating apparatus and 




equipment .... 


84 28 


Plumbing and supplies 


85 81 


Hardware and materials . 


218 32 


All other .... 


29 84 



3,447 86 



52 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Inspection of Animals and Provisions 



Salaries and Wages: — 






Inspector 


. 


2,100 00 


Other Expenses: — 






Telephone 


. 


30 05 


Auto maintenance 


, . 


100 00 


Prlintiing, 'Stationery 


and 




Postage 




3 00 



Expenses 



Outlays 



2,233 06 



Inspection of Milk and' Vinegar 
Salaries and Wages: — 
Inspector 

Milk Collector 
Other Expenses: — 
Books, printing and postage 
Auto maintenance 
Equipment and supplies 
Telephone 

Convention Expenses . 
Travel .... 
All other 



. 


2,500 00 


• 


1 % 500 00 


e 


67 60 




602 81 




189 61 




29 29 




150 00 




120 20 




23 40 



5,182 91 



Inspection of School Children 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Inspectors . . . . 1,600 00 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, printing, postage 
and supplies ... 31 00 

Carfares .... 107 30 



School Nurses' Salaries 


Salaries and: Wages: 


— • 


Nurses . 


2,100 00 


Sewers Construction 


i 


Salaries, and Wages 


— 


Inspector 


382 42 


Lahor 


1,027 08 


Other Expenses: — 




Teaming 


396 78 


Pipe and fittings 


1,651 05 


Brick and cement 


941 46 


Sand 


29 00 


Other material's 


13 05 


Castings 


343 60 


Contract Work 


9,468 91 


All other 


32 74 



1,738 30 



2,100 00 



14,286 09 



CITY AUDITOR. 



Engineering Department, Sewers 
Maintenance 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Inspector .... 790 80 

Labor 11,983 97 



Other [Expenses: — i 
Teaming .... 

Tools and equipment . 
Pipe and Fittings 
Drliick and Cement 
Castings .... 

Cleaning Caitcllx Basins . 
Other materials and supplies 
Care of Mediford Bit. Pump 
Telephone .... 
A1H other .... 



Less service transfers for 
Pipe, brick .... 



Public Buildings Department Maintenance 
Sewer Buildings 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Labor . . ' . . . 1&3 33 



Other Expenses: — 




iFuel 


45 55 


Light .... 


51 63 


Repairs to fouilcNings . 


264 22 


Lumber andl materials 


73 13 


Plumbing 


18 30 


All other . 


2 26 


Sanitary Department 




General Administration: — 




IS uiperintendent 


2,300 00 


Bookkeeper . 


300 00 


Printing and stationery 


4 00 


Telephone 


56 54 


Auto maintenance 


795 19 


Alii other 


3 &4 



Ashes, Rubbish and Garbage 
\LaJboir .... 
Hired teams and trucks 
Equipment and repairs 
Rent of dump 
Materials and supplies 
Contract Work 

Carried forward 



84,067 36 

58,476 55 

688 16 

1,680 00 

61 74 

16,500 00 

164,873 18 



Expenses 



53 

Outlays 



10^269 32 




316 87 




13 89 




6 20 




18 45 




164 07 




77 73 




102 65 




74 89 




3 05 




23,821 89 




67 70 


tm 




23,764 19 



582 ai 



54 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward . . . 164,873 18 

Stable Expenses: — 

Hay, Grain and Straw . 2,723 62 

Shoeing .... 160 31 

Veterinary and medicine . 307 87 

Stable equipment ... 242 37 

Horses 828 00 

Special Item: — 

New Auto .... 775 00 



Expenses 



Outlays 



169,910 35 



Public Building Department Maintenance 

Sanitary Buildings 
Labor ... 

Fuel .... 

Light 

Lumber and Materials 

Plumbing supplies . 
Repairs to buildings 
Furniture and furnishings 
All other .... 



Highways, Street Cleaning 

Labor .... 

Hired Teams and Trucks 
Equipment .... 



152 09 




88 20 




187 96 




176 94 




8 65 




26 51 




4 80 




1 31 






646 46 


20,804 67 


4,424 97 




249 81 






25 479 35 



Highway Maintenance 

General Administration: — 



Superintendent 


3,100 00 


Bookkeeper and Clerk 


2,769 00 


Books, printing, postage and 




supplies .... 


177 20 


Telephone .... 


247 36 


Maintenance, Superintend- 




ents' auto .... 


337 55 


All other .... 


14 00 


General : 




Labor ..... 


49,003 63 


Trucks 


28 75 


Tools, equipment and re- 




pairs 


1,417 64 


Autos and supplies 


2,781 13 


Broken stone, gravel, etc. . 


3,082 66 


Edgestones < bricks and ce- 




ment 


1,819 46 


Lumber .... 


209 46 


Tarvia and road oil . 


2.598 26 


Carried forward 


67,586 10 



CITY AUDITOR. 55 

Expenses Outlays 



Brought forward 


67,586 10 


Fuel .... 


642 81 


Oil and Waste 


661 20 


Steam rollers 


74 19 


Hardware, paint and var- 




nish 


469 57 


Other materials and sup- 




plies 


274 37 


Horses 


5 00 


Hay, graiin and straw . 


7,185 41 


Shoeinig 


402 73 


Veterinary and medicine 


109 65 


Harnesses and horse ©total- 




ing 


528 39 


Aill other .... 


33 21 


Other Expenses: — 




Signs 


429 03 


Repairs to Lowell Street 




Bridge 


4,645 60 


All other .... 


2 70 


Special Item: — 




Taxes, City of Walltham . 


5S7 93 



83,537 89 
Less service transfers for 
teaming, and use of rollers 
and 'horses .... 15,508 49 



Highways Construction, 


New 


Streets 


Lalbor 




100 84 


Contracts . 


. 


11,254 66 


Tarvia 


. 


591 28 


Advertising, Recording^ 


etc. 


69 25 


Edgestones and circles' 


. 


3,243 61 


Other materials 


. 


429 84 


Hired teams and trucks 




31 03 


All other . 


Pern 


6 00 


Highways Construction, 


lanent 


Pavement 






Labor 


m 


1,171 32 


Contracts . 


. 


56,790 31 


Crushed stone, brick 


and 


L 


cement . 


. 


580 11 


Other materials 




106 38 


Hired teams and trucks 


, 


98 54 


Use of mixer and! roller 


, 


21 00 


All other . 


. 


7 50 


Special Item: — 






Relocating Hydrants 




246 44 



68,029 40 



15,726 51 



59,021 60 



56 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



expenses 



Outlays 



Highway Reconstruction and 

Labor 

Hired teams and trucks 

Use of roller . 

Tools 'and equipment 

Road 'Binders . 

Tarvia 

Brick, stone and cement 

Other materials 

Special Item: — 

Washington Street Bridge 
Settlement 



Resurfacing 

6,183 06 

977 78 

901 00 

217 6'8 

7,748 14 

1,792 81 

10,715 07 

120 59 



1,1500 00 



Sidewalks Construction 




Lalbor * . 


8,«92 30 


Hired teams and truck's . 


1,316 24 


Stone, (brick and cement 


3,4121 15 


Edgesfcone 


269 20 


Mixer .... 


212 25 


Other materials 


1,006 95 


Equipment 


2156 76 


All other .... 


4 50 


Sidewalks Maintenance 




Labor . . . 


6,104 08 


Hired teams and trucks . 


903 36 


Use of imixer ... 


13 50 


Stone, brick and cement 


1,313 84 


Equipment . 


12 60 


Other materials and supplies 


355 10 


All other .... 


1 75 


Street Sprinkling 




Labor . . 


6#54 49 


Hired teams and trucks 


2,946 53 


Equipment and repairs . 


836 19 


Oil and other dust layers 


13,520 74 


Maintenance water post and 




hydrants 


185 56 


Use oar sprinkler . 


6,320 83 


Use roller 


47 215 


Gravel 


2 006 84 


Hardware and materials 


1,466 44 


All other 


93 48 


Special Item: : — 




Auto Chasisds . 


555 00 


Tractor . 


687 50 



30 156 12 



15,379 35 



8,704 23 



34,620 85 



CITY AUDITOR. 



Street Lighting 

Contract: — 

Electricity- 
Spot lights 
Relocating lights 
Memorial Tablets 
All other . 



76,071 66 

61 11 

159 47 

73 11 

1 20 



Public Buildings Department, 


Maintenance 


Highway Buildings 




Lajbor . . 


233 61 


Fuel 


703 42 


Light .... 


221 57 


Hardware and materials 


23 06 


Dumber .... 


277 04 


Plumbing supplies . 


42 69 


Furniture and furnislhinigs 


3 00 


Repairs to 'buildings 


305 11 


Heating apparatus and equip 




ment .... 


12 70 


All other 


1 85 



Expenses 



57 

Outlays 



76,366 55 



1,824 OS 





CHARIITIES 


Poor Department, Miscellaneous 




General Administration: — 






Agent .... 


. 


2,200 00 


Clerks .... 


. 


2;266 75 


Books, printing, postage and 




supplies 


. 


76 46 


Telephone 


. 


125 74 


Conference Expenses . 


. 


19 00 


Al)l other . 


. 


125 33 


Outside Relief: — 






City Physician 




2,200 00 


Auto Maintenance 




150 00 


Board and care . 




2,720 14 


Cash .... 




20,558 38 


Cash Allowance . 




621 24 


Groceries and provisions 


i 


2,604 24 


Coal and wood . 




1 182 63 


Dry goods and clothing 




' 10 16 


Mediciine and medical 


ait> 




tendance 




214 46 


Nursing .... 




46 00 


State Institutions 




3,420 80 


Contagious Hospital . 




n oo 


Carried forward 


# 


38,461 33 



58 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Brought forward . . . 38,461 33 

Somerville Hospital . . . 6,643 00 

Other Institutions . . 963 86 

Burials 259 40 

Relief by Other Cities and 
Towns: — 

Cities ..... 3,-940 86 

Towns 231 37 

Mothers' Aid: — 

By city . . . . 37,266 00 

Other ditiies and towns . 7,366 98 



Poor* Department, City Home 
Salaries and Wages: — 



Warden and Matron . 


2,100 00 


Bookkeeper .... 


1215 00 


Domestic labor 


2,429 83 


Farm labor .... 


2,334 80 


Other Expenses: — 




Auto maintenance 


97 50 


Groceries and provisions . 


3,366 64 


Clothing 


302 60 


Medicine and hospital 




goods 


42 40 


Household furnishing and 




supplies .... 


326 25 


Farm equipment and sup- 




plies 


440 85 


Live stock land care . 


342 45 


Garbage .... 


15 25 


Hay, grain and feed . 


971 76 


Horse shoeling 


51 50 


Harnesses and horse cloth- 




ing 


24 50 


Seeds and fertilizer . 


97 68 


Books, printing, stationery 




postage . . 


28 57 


Telephone .... 


76 66 


Power . 


50 91 


Ice 


117 56 


Disinfectant and sprayer . 


4 50 


All other .... 


220 86 



Public Building Department, City Home 
Buildings 

(Labor 490 19 

Fuel 1,933 99 

Liglht 696 43 



Expenses Outlays 



95,132 80 



13,572 07 



Carried forward . . . 3,120 61 



CITY AUDITOR. 



Brought forward 

Furniture and furniisJhitngs 
Repairs to (buildings 
Plumbing and supplies . 
Heating apparatus equipment 

and repairs .... 

Hardware and materials 

All other . . . ... 

Special Item: — 

Wire fence .... 



3,120 61 



400 


77 


118 


94 


133 


56 


70 


39 


227 


84 


7 


45 


234 


% 



Expenses 



59 

Outlays 



4,314 50 



SOLDIERS' BENEFITS 

Soldiers' Benefits, General Administration 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Agent .... 
Clerk .... 
Other Expenses . 



Soldiers' Relief 

Cash as per pay atolls 

All other . 



Military Aid 

Cash as per payrolls 

State Aid 

Cash as per pay rolls 

Soldiers' Burials 
Burials . . . 



300 00 

988 00 

44 63 


1,332 63 

31,608 29 
4 412 00 


31,5>95 00 
13 29 


4,412 00 



8,262 00 



61 67 



8,262 00 



61 67 



EDUCATION 


School Contingent 




Sialaries and Wages: — 




(Superintendent 


5,000 00 


€lerks . . 


6,742 66 


Truant Officers 


1,800 00 


Other employees . 


332 88 


General Expenses: 1 — 




Stationery, postage and 




office isupp'lieis . 


071 62 


Telephones .... 


1,115 97 


Automobile maintenance 


444 59 


Travel 


389 9B 


All other .... 


180 56 



Carried -forward 



16,678 24 



60 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Expenses 



Brought forward 


16,678 


24 


Textbooks and Supplies: — 






Text and reference "books 






and music . 


11,86.9 


02 


Maps . . . . 


52 


86 


iS'tationiery anjd supplies . 


ismz 


42 


Equipment and repairs 


2,415 


32 


Other Bxipenses : — 




9 


Tuition .... 


1,959 


50 


Support of Truants 


863 


42 


Diplomas and graduation 


871 


81 


Printing and advertising 


1,355 


81 


Catering 


149 


50 


Power .... 


786 


09 


Binding 


1,106 


61 


All other 


73 


06 


Typewriters . 


1,900 


63 

eft r ok oq 






OD,t>iiO tifj 


School Teachers' Salaries 






Day Schools 


726,843 


91 


Evening Schools 


8,175 


65 
— 735,019 56 



Outlays 



Public Building Department, Maintenance 

School Buildings, Janitors' Salaries 
Janitors' Salaries . . . 58,143 59 



Maintenance School Buildings, 


Fuel and 


Light 




Dalbor 


38 00 


Fuel 


39,839 15 


Light 


10,077 77 




Af\ <\KA O? 




ti/,tJo'± <J*t 


Maintenance School Buildings, 


Buildings 


and Grounds 




Labor ..... 


9,168 46 


Furniture and furnishings 


6,752 39 


Janitors' Supplies . 


2,532 76 


Laundry 


68 75 


Repairs to buildings 


14,127 18 


Heating apparatus and equip- 




ment 


7,953 56 


Plumlbing 


4,954 25 


Glass, hardware and paint 


2,582 05 


LumJber 


1,570 90 


Other materials and supplies 


3,353 50 


Care of Grounds 


4,127 95 


Flags and Flag poles 


263 68 


Carried forward 


57,455 43 



CITY AUDITOR. 



Addition Southern Junior High School 



Construction Contract 

Advertising 

Architect Fees 

Insurance . 

Labor 

All other . 



61,549 67 

13 25 

4,988 77 

280 00 

100 27 

91 00 



Expenses 



61 

Outlays 



Brought forward 


57,465 


43 


Auto maintenance . 


403 


14 


Power .... 


267 


19 


Teamiing .... 


922 


33 


Telephone 


51 


25 


All other .... 


387 


67 






Ut7,4rO 1 Ul 


Addition Western Junior High School 




Construction Contract 


75,346 


67 


Heattinig Contract . 


15£»2 


05 


Electrical Contract . /. 


2,973 


99 


Plu'mbing 'Contract . 


6,069 


00 


Architects Fees 


7,050 


64 


Advertising 


13 


25 


All 'other .... 


68 


30 



106,713 90 



67,022 96 



Northern- Eastern Junior High, School 



Construction Contract 
Heating Contract 
Electrical Contract 
Plumbing Contract 
Architects Fees 
Purchase olf Land 
Taxes 

Clerical hire 
All other . 



51,510 00 

989 70 

1,428 00 

1 615 00 

15*407 10 

49,204 67 

1,418 88 

1,0>5'8 39 

173 56 



122,805 30 



SCHOOL TRUST FUNDS 



S. Newton Cutler Fund 
Books .... 

Smith-Hughes Fiend 

School Teachers' Salaries 
Caroline G. Baker Fund 
Christmas celelbrations . 



405 98 405 98 

2,678 18 2,678 18 

10 13 10 13 



62 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



West Somerville Branch Library 



Expenses 



Outlays 



LIBRARIES 
Central Library 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Librarian .... 3,000 00 

Assistants .... 17,534 05 

Other Expenses: — 

. Books 5,628 35 

Periodicals .... 672 15 

Music 113 04 

Binding 1,485 81 

Postage and office supplies 781 39 

Printing and advertising . 632 35 

Telephone .... 179 52 

Catalogue cards . . . 246 15 

Express .... 147 73 

Convention expenses . . 52 62 

All other .... 264 75 



Public Building Department. 


Central 


Library 




Janitors .... 


3,068 00 


L*afboT .... 


26 48 


Fuel 


1,162 60 


Light .... 


1,177 59 


Furniture and furnishings 


91 42 


Janitors' (supplies . 


90 05 


Repairs to buildings 


246 66 


Hardware and materials . 


73 16 


All other .... 


16 08 



30,737 91 



5,%2 04 



Salaries and Wages: — 




Assistants .... 


5,630 11 


Other Expenses: — 




Books 


1,014 51 


Periodicals .... 


329 12 


Music 


54 15 


Binding 


519 38 


Postage and office supplies 


111 21 


Printing and advertising . 


43 85 


Telephone .... 


37 24 


Express 


206 09 


All other .... 


9 23 



7£54 89 



CITY AUDITOR. 



Public Building Department, Maintenance 
West Somerville Branch Library 



Janitor 


1 352 00 


Ijabor 


' 71 35 


Fuel 


519 31 


Light 


397 81 


Repairs to buildings and 




plumbing .... 


53 95 


Furniture and furnishings 


13 30 


Hardware and materials . 


90 


All other 


59 47 


East Somerville Branch Library 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Assistants .... 


3,S03 29 


Other Expenses: — 




Books 


983 25 


Periodicals .... 


139 85 


Music 


44 27 


Binding 


318 51 


Postage and office supplies 


98 68 


Printing and advertising . 


7 35 


Telephone .... 


33 96 


Express . ... 


205 74 



Public Buildings Department, 


Maintenance 


East Somerville Branch 


Library 


Janitor ..... 


1,101 00 


Lahor . . 


22 80 


Fuel 


155 38 


Light .... 


205 07 


Janitors' Supplies . 


75 


Furniture and furnishings 


3 13 


Hardware and materials 


19 27 


Repairs to buildings and 




plumbing .... 


4 45 


All other . . . . 


2 75 


Union Square Branch Library 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Assistants .... 


3,958 14 


Other Expenses : — 




Books 


1,232 24 


Periodicals .... 


143 20 


Music 


2 34 


Binding .... 


372 01 



Expenses 



63 

Outlays 



2,468 09 



5,334 90 



1,514 60 



Carried forward 



5,707 93 



64 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward ... 

Postage and office supplies 
Printing and advertising . 
Telephone . 

Express .... 

All other .... 



5,707 93 

90 15 
14 35 
37 84 
206 06 
44 58 



Expenses 



Outlays 



Public Building Department, Maintenance 


Union Square Branch Library 




Janitor 


1,12:2 48 


Labor 


91 80 


Fuel 


445 52 


Light . . 


290 43 


Janitors' Supplies . 


14 10 


Furniture and furnishings 


2 90 


Heating apparatus and equip- 




ment 


54 19 


Plumbing and repairs to build- 




ing 


30 75 


Hardware and materials 


54 46 


All other 


15 85 



6,099 91 



2,122 48 



S. Newton Cutler Fund 
Books 



PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 

Expenses 

69 83 



Martha R. Hunt Art Fund 

Books and pictures . 

All other 


Ill 73 

45 50 


Martha R. Hunt Book Fund 
Books 


574 17 


Isaac Pitman Art Fund 

Books 

Pictures 

All other 


111 10 

114 00 
9 00 


Isaac Pitman Poetry Fund 
Books 


89 73 



Wilders Childrens" Fund 
Books ... 



11 69 



69 93 



157 23 



574 17 



234 10 



89 73 



11 69 



Outlays 



CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenses 



65 

Outlays 



Engineering Department, Parks 


Mainteance 


Labor 


7,924 45 


Teaming .... 




789 87 


Tools and equipment 




167 43 


Materials and supplies . 




860 39 


Trees, shruibs and plants 




702 55 


Loam .... 




11 00 


Repairs .... 




237 14 


Flags and flag poles 




87 91 


Care of buhblers and foun- 






tains .... 




365 91 


All other 




5 65 


Special Item: — 




Power Lawn Mower . 


230 85 






11,383 15 



Public Buildings Department^ Maintenance 
Park Buildings 

Labor 

Fuel .-...: 
Light 

Repairs to buildings 
Plumbing . 

Hardware and materials 
Laundry and j anJitors' sup- 
plies 

All other 



Engineering Department, 
Maintenance 

Labor 

Teaming 

Tools and <equi{pment . 
Materials and supplies . 
Repairs to fountains, fences, 

etc 

All other 



467 


38 


175 


50 


551 


29 


1 


60 


49 


95 


30 


80 


232 


34 


1 


70 


Playgrour 


ds 


4,190 


05 


886 


14 


194 


25 


373 


39 


172 


56 


1 


03 



Special Item: — 
Fence Kent Street Play- 
ground . . . . 



1,510 56 



338 30 



6,155 72 



Public Welfare and Recreation Commission 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Supervisors .... 1,382 52 

Instructors .... 1,640 00 

Other Helpers . . . 264 75 



Carried forward 



3,287 27 



66 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Expenses 



Brought forward 


3,287 27 


Other Expenses : — 




Equipment and supplies 


342 03 


Plowing, harrowing, etc. 


102 50 


Teaming . 


197 00 


Use of auto . 


295 15 


Civic social centre 


164 59 


All other 


273 54 


Public Building Department, 


Maintenance 


Bathhouse 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Attendants 


908 54 


Labor .... 


199 08 


Other Expenses: — 




Bathing Suits 


191 06 


Towels .... 


33 30 


Repairs to buildings . 


29 67 


Equipment and supplies 


274 83 


Sand . ... 


524 61 


Telephone 


32 03 


Laundry 


206 85 


Hardware and materials 


96 77 


All other 


34 75 



Outlays 



4,662 08 



2,531 49 



Celebrations 




Printing and postage 


88 28 


Music .... 


1,916 30 


Decorating 


802 60 


Fire Works 


3,050 00 


Expenses for Troops 


100 00 


Equipment and Supplies 


1,007 60 


Special cars and Trains 


675 66 


(Refreshments . . . . 


1 194 75 


Horses . . 


'333 50 


Light 


63 86 


All other .... 


230 75 


Field House — Richard Trum 


Playground 


Blueprints .... 


1 43 


Field House— Dilboy Field 




Blueprints 


63 



9,463 30 



1 43 



63 



Memorial Day 

Music and Catering 
Flowers and Flags . 
All other . 

Special Item: — 
Grave Markers 



CITY AUDITOR. 

UNCLASSIFIED 



264 53 

142 80 

72 73 



264 23 



Public Building Department, Maintenance 
Bandstand 

Laibor 204 GO 

Teaming ... . 87 00 

Hardware and Materials . . 121 27 



Rifle Practice Cos. A and B, First Engin- 
eers 

Use of range .... 273 00 

Transportation . . . . 241 20 



Municipal Documents 




Printing .... 


2,047 99 


All other .... 


35 70 


Quarters for American Legion 


Rent 


572 00 


Workmen's Compensation 




Compensations for Injuries 


3,910 63 


Medical attendance . 


300 50 


Books, postage, supplies 


1 50 


Pensions 




Janitors .... 


1,943 32 


Police .... 


9,182 74 


Fire 


4,747 95 


Weights and Measures . 


812 50 


Health .... 


750 00 


Poor 


850 00 


Laborers: — 




Engineers' 


414 00 


Higihway .... 


10,032 84 


Sanitary 


7,654 80 


Water 


2,479 41 



Damage to Persons and Personal Property 
Settlement of claims . . 14 278 59 



Expenses 



Outlays 



744 29 



412 87 



514 20 



2.0S3 69 



572 00 



4,212 63 



3S.867 56 



14,278 59 



68 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 



Municipal Indebtedness Interest 

Temporary Loans: — 



Expenses 



Outlays 



Anticipation of Revenue 


42,377 


06 


General Loans: — 






Sewer .... 


7,963 


75 


Highway 




11,050 


00 


Municipal 




675 


00 


Oity 




9,257 


50 


Bridge 




962 


50 


Metropolitan Park 




280 


00 


Public Buildings . 




9,330 00 


Emergency 




212 


50 


School House . 




4,208 


33 






Sfi Q1 R RA 






50,o±0 04 


Reduction of Funded Debt 






General Loans: — 






Sewer .... 


23,000 


00 


Highway 




60,000 


00 


Municipal 




8,000 


00 


City 




52,500 


00 


Bridge 




1,000 


00 


Metropolitan Park 




1,000 


00 


Public Buildings . 




19,000 


00 


Emergency 




5 000 


00 
— 169,500 00 



WATER WORKS 



Water Maintenance 




Administration 




Commissioner 


3,100 00 


Clerks 


7,256 52 


Books, printing, postage and 




supplies .... 


1,682 78 


Telephone .... 


298 21 


All other .... 


110 01 


General: — 




Labor 


42,033 90 


Teams 


15 75 


Pipe and fittings . 


4,354 36 


Meters and fittings 


3,259 92 


Hydrants and fittings . 


257 57 


Tools 


2,589 00 


Autos, trucks and supplies 


4,700 64 


Horses and equipment 


249 57 


Power 


32 21 


Miscellaneous supplies 


256 71 


Carried forward 


70,197 16 



CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenses 



69 

Outlays 



Brought forward 


70,197 


15 






Street Repairs 


139 


38 






Fountains 


110 


29 






All other 


62 


60 






Special Items: — 










New Trucks . 


1,225 


00 






High Service Survey . 


1,527 


00 






Low Service Survey . 


1,500 


00 








$74,761 


42 




Less Service Transfers for 










Teams .... 


753 


74 


74 % 007 


68 








Water Wopks Extension 










Labor .... 


10,605 


20 






Hired teams and trucks . 


653 


75 






Pipe and fittings 


16,302 


24 






Meters and fittings . 


2,277 


70 






Hydrants and fittings 


946 


04 






Tools and equipment 


1,754 


99 


3'2,539 


92 








Public Building Department, 


Maintenance 






Water Buildings 










Lahor .... 


48 


70 






Fuel 


811 


70 






Light .... 


318 


84 






Lumber and Materials . 


51 


51 






Repairs to buildings 


62 


78 






Plumbing .... 


6 


91 






Janitors Supplies 


22 


50 






Furniture and furnishings 


1 


20 






All other 




70 


1,324 


84 








Metropolitan Water Assessmc 


*nt 








Assessment 


. $128,207 


84 


128,207 


84 



OTHER ACCOUNTS 

Temporary Loans 

Loans in anticipation of reve- 
nue $1,843,000 00 



Tax Titles 

Taxes 1921 
Title purchased 



750 84 
12 00 



1,843,000 00 



762 84 



70 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Expenses 



Outlays 



Real Estate Liens 
Taxes 1921 on property taken 
by the city .... 



15 65 



State Taxes 






±a 


DO 


State 


194 520 


00 






Non-Resident Bank . 


4,025 


76 


198,545 


76 








Poll Taxes . . 


70,119 


00 


70,119 


00 








Metropolitan and Other Assessments 








Metropolitan Park . 


61,386 


67 






Metropolitan 'Sewer . 


95,065 


14 






Wellington Bridge . 


3,352 


75 






Charles River Basin 


8,923 


72 






Alewife Brook . 


1,083 


37 






Abatement of Smoke 


403 


74 






Prevention of Fire . 


1,066 


06 






Grade Crossings 


4,678 


49 






State Highway .... 


396 


46 






Soldiers' Exemption . 


286 


84 


176,643 


24 








County of Middlesex 










County Tax 1922 


123,565 


67 


123,565 


67 








Cash Refunds 










Taxes . . . 


659 


54 






Street 'Sprinkling . 


31 


26 






Water 


96 


89 






Other 


91 


24 







Tellers' Overs and Shorts 

Oash Shortage 



179 99 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Liquor License Fees 



9 00 



179 99 



9 00 



PRIVATE TRUST 



Redemption of Tax Titles 

Tax Titles Redeemed . 



Totals 
♦Refunds 



Total Cash Payments 



2,875 79 



2,875 79 



$5,254,380 47 $431,571 87 
21,685 49 15,174 00 



$!>,276,065 96 $446,745 87 
$5,722,811 83 



•Expenditures as shown In all accounts are net 



CITY AUDITOR. 



71 



SCHEDULE OF PUBLIC PROPERTY 



School Buildings 

Prescott 

East Somerville Junior 

Han scorn . 

Davis 

Clark iBennett . 

Knapp 

Baxter 

Perry 

Bell and Southern Junior 

Prosipect Hill . 

Pope .... 

Gumming s 

Edgerly 

* High 

Glines 

Forster ... 

Forster (Annex) 

t Proctor . 

Bingham 

Morse 

Can* .... 

Girls' Industrial Senool 

Durell 

Burns 

Brawn 

Highland . 

Lowe 

HodgMns . 

x West Somervdille-Jumior 

Lincoln 

Outler 

t Norrtih'n Hast'n Junior 

Total . 



High 



High 



High 
High 



Land and 
Building's 

$72,200 00 
62 000 00 
66)500 
63,600 
54,500 
53,000 
319,200 
512,000 

137,000 
18,000 
83,600 
18,400 
43,000 

396 000 
96,400 
64,000 00 
40,000 00 
44,000 00 
77,000 00 
54,000 00 
58,600 00 
4,000 00 
21,400 00 
44,000 00 
78,000 00 
6i6,600 00 
51,000 00 
98,700 00 
80,000 00 
20,000 00 
98,800 00 
22,700 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



Personal 



$3,000 

2,000 

4,0'00 
17J500 

3,500 

5,500 

1,500 

1 500 

io'ooo 

2,000 
5,000 
1,600 
5,000 
30,000 00 
5,000 00 
8,000 00 



1,500 
3,000 
2,600 
6,000 
2,000 
5,000 
4,000 
1,000 
10,000 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5 500 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



Totals 

$75,200 

64,000 

70,500 

71,000 

58,000 

58,500 

40,700 

53,500 

147,000 

20,000 

88,600 

19,900 

48,000 

426,000 

101,400 

112,000 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



44,000 00 
82,000 00 
69,000 00 
68,100 00 



22,900 00 

47,000 00 

80,600 

71 600 

5)3,000 
103,700 

84,000 

21,000 
108 800 

22,700 



0C 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



$2,168,100 00 $1164,600 00 $2,322,700 00 



* Land included in Central Hill Park. 
t Building and fixtures. Land owned by State. 
x Land included in Holland Street Ledge. 
% Land only. 



72 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



School Build] 

Fire Buildings 
New Fire alarm 
Central 


ngs 
building 


Land and 
Buildings 

$27,500 00 
47,700 00 
37,000 00 
29,500 00 
23,500 00 
60,000 00 
11,200 00 
19,700 00 
19,500 00 


Personal 
* $40,000 00 


Totals 
$115,200 00 


Engine Two 
Engine Six 
Hose Five 
Ladder One 
Hose Eight 


22,000 00 

25,000 00 

8,000 00 

15^500 00 


59,000 00 
54,500 00 
31,500 00 
75 500 00 
11,200 00 


Ladder Two 
Engine Four 


1:5,000 00 
7,000 00 


34,700 00 
26,500 00 


Total . 


. $275,600 00 


$132,500 00 


$408,100 00 



* Includes Electrical Department equipment 



Libraries 



♦Central 137,500 00 

East Sotmerville Branch . 22,000 00 
Wtest SomervtMe Branch . 30',500 00 


100,000 00 
2,400 00 
6,000 00 


237,500 00 
24,400 00 
36,500 00 


Total . . y . 

Miscellaneous Buildings 

Highway ('stahles, etc.) 

Sewer 

Contagions and Tn*bepci 

Hosip'ital 
Oity Home 

Police .... 
••Oity Hall 
* City Hall Annex . 
Barks : — 

Broadway 


. $190,000 00 

55,000 00 
6,700 00 
dosis 

57,000 00 
95,100 00 
70,500 00 
57,200 00 
68,200 00 

3,100 00 
3,000 00 
5,000 00 
1 800 00 
21,000 00 
49,000 00 


$108,400 00 

30,000 00 
500 00 

9,000 00 
17 000 00 

8',000 00 

149,000 00 

12,500 00 


$298,400 00 

85,000 00 
7,200 00 

6'6,000 00 
112,100 00 

78,500 00 
206,200 00 

80,700 00 

3,100 00 


Lincoln . 
Bathhouse 




3,000 00 
5,000 00 


Polling Booths 




1,800 00 


Sanitary 
Water 


19,200 00 
6,500 00 


40,200 00 
55,500 00 


Total . 

* Land included in Centra 

Parks and Playgrounds 

Sax ton C. Foss Park 


. $492,600 00 
1 Hill Park. 

Land and 
Building-s 

. $421,200 00 

472,000 00 

84,500 00 

69,800 00 

109,000 00 

1,000 00 

5,100 00 

70,900 00 


$251,700 00 
Personal 


$744,300 00 

Totals 

$421 200 00 
472',000 00 


Central Hill 




Lincoln 

Prospect Hill . 
Tufts 


3,500 00 
1,500 00 


88,000 00 

71,300 00 

109,000 00 


Paul Revere 




1,000 00 


Belmont Street 




5,100 00 


Tram Playground . 




70,900 00 






Total .... 


. $1,233 500 00 


$5,000 00 $1,238,500 00 



CITY AUDITOR. 



73 



Glen Street 


$1,233^500 00 

17,300 00 

12,000 00 

5,800 00 

3,000 00 

4,12 00 00 

40 000 00 


$5,000 00 $1,238,500 00 
17.300 00 


Kent iStreet 






12,000 00 


Poplar Street . 






5,800 00 


Beacon Street . 






3,000 00 


Mason Street 






4,200 00 


Dilboy Field . 


20,000 


00 


60,000 00 


Total .... 

Miscellaneous Land 

Ledge, Holland Street . 


$1,315,800 

54,500 
300 
400 
600 
100 
100 
2,100 
600 
500 

10,000 


00 

00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 


$25,000 00 $1,340,800 00 
K4.500 00 


SomerviiHe Avenue . 






300 00 


Putnam .... 






400 00 


Murdock Street 






600 00 


Lowell Street . 






100 00 


Spencer Avenue 






100 00 


Weston Avenue 






2,100 00 


Endioott Avenue 






"600 00 


Powder House Boulevard 






500 00 


Waltliam Gravel Land . 






10,000 00 










Total .... 


$69,200 00 






$'69,200 00 



School Buildings 

Fire Budldlings 
Libraries 

Miscellaneous Buildings 
Parks and Playgrounds 
Miscellaneous Land 

Total . 
Sewer Oeosit) . 
Wiater Works (cost) 



Total value public property 



SUMMARY 












Land and 










Buildings 


Personal 


Totals 




. 2468,100 


00 


154 600 


00 


2,322,700 


00 


275,600 


00 


132^500 


00 


408,100 


00 


190,000 


00 


108,400 


00 


298,400 


00 


492,600 


00 


251,700 


00 


744,300 


00 


. 1,315,800 


00 


25,000 


00 


1,340,800 


00 


69 200 


00 






69,200 


00 


l 








. $'4,511,300 


00 


$672,200 00 $5,183,500 00 


. 








1,376,757 


00 


• 








1,127,746 


65 



$7,688,003 65 



74 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF 

TAXES 



Somerville, Mass. 
January 19, 1923. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville: 

Gentlemen : — 

I herewith present the annual report of the City Treasurer 
and Collector of Taxes for the year 1922. 

Kespectfully submitted, .... 

Joseph S. Pike, 
City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



75 



CONDENSED CASH STATEMENT 



Receipts 
Revenue . . $5,429,284 99 
Non-Revenue . 643,049 79 



Cash Balance, 

Jan. 1, 1922 



$6,072,334 78 

161,234 20 

$6,233,568 98 



Payments 



Cash Balance, 

Dec. 31, 1922 



$5,278,689 16 
444,122 67 

$5,722,811 83 

510,757 15 

$6,233,568 98 



DETAILED 



Balance from 1921 

Revenue 

Taxes, 1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

Excise Taxes, 1921 
1922 



CASH STATEMENT 
Receipts 



$23 20 

33 80 

387 41 

438,447 62 

2,409,023 15 



$161,234 20 



21 66 
12 66 



Street Sprinkling, 1921 . . 7,971 73 

1922 . 37,492 94 

Highway Assessments, 1920 . 219 22 

1921 . 3y554 93 

1922 . 



Sidewalk Assessments, 1920 . 1,143 67 

1921 . 5,057 32 

1922 . 3,071 40 

Sewer Assessments, 1921 . 1,488 35 

1922 . 1,090 61 

Metered Water Charges, 1921 

Water: Sales, 1922 . . 236,331 76 

Maintenance . . 4,547 24 

Service Assessments 9,674 58 

Departmental Deposits . 11,381 57 

Departmental Accounts . 90,332 23 

Com on wealth of Massachusetts: 

Corporation Taxes . . 73,991 85 

Bank Taxes . . . 8,872 34 

Street Railway Taxes . 24,477 35 



Carried forward 



$2,847,915 18 



34 32 



45,464 67 



3,774 15 



9,272 39 



2,578 96 
26,272 24 



250,553 58 
101,713 80 

107,341 54 
5,394,921 13 $161,234 20 



76 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward 



$3,394,921 13 $161,234 20 



Income Taxes, 1919 


438 


25 




1920 


3,067 


75 




1921 


18,406 50 




1922 


120,196 


40 


142,108 90 








For Schools: 








Vocational Schools 


8,273 


44 




Continuation Schools . 


4,011 


34 




Americanization ■ . . 


3,581 


50 




Commission for the Blind . 


600 


00 


16,466 28 








Soldiers' Benefits 


. 




11,915 50 


In lieu of taxes . 






92 75 


Poll Taxes .... 






16,995 00 


Boxing Licenses . 






19 84 


Boston Elevated deficit 






21,712 43 


County of Middlesex: 








Dog licenses 






2,053 71 


Courts, Police 


5,376 


96 




Probation officer . 


30 


00 




County . 


114 


00 


5,520 96 








Departmental Penalties : 








School Department . 






174 00 


Licenses and Permits . 






12,923 75 


Liquor, for Commonwealth 






3 75 


Interest: on Taxes 


14,902 


86 




Assessments 


195 


46 




Tax Titles 


2 


33 




Departmental accts. 


1 


50 




Bank accts. Treasurer . 


11,885 


23 




City Clerk 


8 


28 


26,995 66 








Treasury Department: 








Costs, Taxes 


5,461 


24 




Assessments . 


28 


30 


- 


Tax Titles 


9 


00 




Miscellaneous 








Tax Lien certificates 


796 


00 




Redemption certificates 


16 


00 




Collecting Bank-tax 


40 


22 


6,350 76 








Edison Electric Illuminating 








Company, electrolysis 






500 00 


Sale of Fire Station, Marsh- 








all istreet (part payment) 






1,500 00 


General Expenses, refunds . 






2,194 82 


jEteal Estate Liens 






135 00 


Tax Titles .... 






77 27 


Temporary Loans . 






1,758,000 00 


Trust Funds, Income: 








School: Cutler Fund . 


214 


50 




Baker Fund . 


13 


50 




Smith-Hughes Fund 


2,459 


34 
$ 




Carried forward 


5,420,661 51 $161,234 20 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



77 



Brought forward 

Library : Cutler Fund 

Hunt Art Fund . 

Hunt Book Fund . 

Pitman Art Fund . 

Pitman Poetry Fund . 

Wilder, Children's Fund 
Poor: Olive C. Cumming s. 

Premium on Bonds 
Accrued interest . 
Excess and Deficiency . 



Non-Revenue 

Funded debt, Schoolhouse loan 

Highway loan . 
Sale of buildings, Junior High 

school lot, Marshall street 
Boston Elevated RiaiTy, Cross 

street 

Redemption of Tax Liens 



$5,420,661 51 $161,234 20 



42 88 
100 00 
495 29 
171 32 

42 82 
4 50 

75 05 


3,619 20 

2,397 50 

2,402 78 

204 00 




575,000 00 
50,000 00 

5,095 00 

10,079 00 
2,875 79 


6,429,284 99 
643,049 79 

fi 07° 194 7ft 






0,V i UfOot (a 




$6,233,568 98 



Revenue 

Taxes, 1917, refunds 

1918, refunds 

1919, refunds 

1920, refunds 

1921, refunds 

1922, refunds 



Taxes, Corporation, to Com 

monwealth of Massachusetts 
Street Sprinkling, 1922, refunds 
Water Charges, 1922, refunds 
Prior years 

Real estate Liens 

Tax Titles .... 

Revenue Loans . . . . 

Reduction off Funded Ddbt . 

General Expenses 

Metropolitan Water Assess- 
ments .... 

Interest: Funded Debt . 

Revenue Loans 1921 
Revenue Loans, 1922 



Carried forward 



PAYMENTS 




$6 


00 




2 


00 




2 


00 




153 


32 




104 


64 




391 


58 


$ 659 54 






i 




64 62 


Is 




31 26 


93 


35 




3 


54 


96 89 






. 




15 55 






762 84 






1,843,000 00 






169,500 00 






2,457,426 99 






128,207 84 


46,231 


25 




5,181 


25 




37,195 


81 


88,608 31 







T8 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Commonwealth of Massachu 
setts : 

State Tax . 
Assessments 
Soldiers' Exemption . 
Bank Tax, Non-resident 
War Poll Tax, 1922 . 
Liquor licenses . 

County of Middlesex, county 
tax . 

Trust Funds: 

School: Cutler Fund . 
Smith-Hughes Fund 
Baker Fund . 

Library: Cutler Fund 
Hunt Art Fund 
Hunt Book Fund . 
Pitman Art Fund . 
Pitman Poetry Fund 
Wilder Fund . 

Tellers' shorts and overs 
Excess and Deficiency . 



Non-Revenue 

Outlay Appropriations . 
Redemption of Tax Titles 



Cash in office . 
Deposits in banks . 



1- 

194,520 


00 






176,356 


40 






286 


84 






4,025 


76 






k . 87,114 


00 






3 


75 


462,306 75 




v 






7 




123,565 67 




405 


98 






2,678 


18 






10 


13 


3,094 29 










69 


83 






157 


23 






574 


17 






234 


10 






89 


73 






11 


69 


1,136 75 














179 99 








31 87 






5,278,689 16 




441,246 


88 






2,875 


79 


444,122 67 














r 700 qi 1 


83 






. 




5,337 55 




• 




505,419 60 

cr-i a 7E.7 


15 




OJ.V,(Ql 




$6,233,568 


98 



BALANCES DECEMBER 31, 1922 



Cash .... 


. 


$510,757 15 


Cash advances 


, 


200 00 


Taxes, 1917 . 


772 20 




1918 . 


120 32 




1919 . 


100 79 




1920 . 


1,682 22 




1921 . 


4,832 56 




1922 . 


411,970 19 




1922, Excise 


20 65 


419,498 93 






Carried forward 


$930,456 08 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OP TAXES. 



70 



Brought forward 






$930,456 08 




Street Sprinkling, 1922 






7,546 42 




Overlay and abatement, 1917 








766 20 


1918 








141 52 


1919 






111 29 




1920 








1,007 13 


1921 








3,603 21 


1922 








15,203 55 




20,721 61 


Supplementary Assessments 








528 66 


Highway Assessments, 1921 . 


864 


37 






1922. 


7,361 


02 


8,225 39 




Sidewalk Assessments, 1921 


1,012 


07 




1922 


3,341 


05 


4,353 12 












Sewer Assessments, 1921 . 


92 


72 




i 


1922 . 


6,469 


13 


6,561 85 












Metered Water Charges, 1922 






33,666 39 




Commonwealth of Massachu- 










setts, Benefits . 






10,519 67 




Grade Crossings 






427 30 




Real Estate Liens . 






74 43 




Tax Titles . . . 






3,164 08 




Temporary Loans . 








500,000 00 


Loans Authorized . 






300,000 00 




Funded Delbrt .... 








1,459,000 00 


Net Funded Debt . 






1,459,000 00 




Commonwealth of Massachu- 










setts, poll taxes 






2,704 00 




Sale of land and buildings on 










Miarsrall street . 








1,500 00 


Outlay Appropriations . 








626,367 28 


Trust Funds: 










School: Cutler Fund 


• 






453 25 


Smith-Hughes Fund 








1,466 90 


Caroline G. Baker . 








6 75 


Library: Cutler Fund 








48 


Hunt Art Fund 








32 01 


Hunt Book Fund . 








76 


Pitman Art Fund . 








52 


Pitman Poetry Fund 








4 97 


Wilder Fund . 








4 29 


Hunt Art Fund, Principal 








202 77 


Poor: Olive C. Cummings 










Fund .... 








357 17 


Premium on bonds 






< 


2,397 50 


Accrued Interest . 








111 11 


Sundry Persons 








291 65 


Excess and Deficiency . 








150,005 89 


Carried forward 


$2,766,810 02 


$2,763,453 57 



80 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward 

Reserve Fund, Surplus from 

Overlay- 
Public Trust Funds 
Public Trust Funds, Invest- 
ment . 



$2,766,810 02 $2,763,453 57 



27,396 24 



3,356 45 
27,396 24 



$2,794,206 26 $2,794,206 26 



The assessors' warrant for the tax levy, assessed upon 
polls and property April 1, 1922, including non-resident bank 
shares, amounted to 12,891,419.38, and the tax rate established 
was $30.60 on each $1,000 of valuation, as follows : 

Real Estate .... 
Personal Estate 
Resident bank shares 

Total valuation 

At a rate of $30.60 

Polls, 28,911 at $5.00 . 

Non-resident bank shares to 
be paid to the state (val- 
uation $131,560 73) . 

Street Sprinkling . 



Additional Assessments: 
Personal estate, valuation 

$8,400 at $30.60 . 
127 polls at $5.00 . - . 
Excise taxes 



Total commitments by assessors 



$80,326,900 00 

7,755,400 00 

75,839 27 




$88,158,139 27 


$2,697,639 06 
144,555 00 

4,025 76 
45,199 56 


$257 04 

635 00 

33.31 


$2,891,419 38 
925 35 






$2,892,344 73 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OP TAXES. 



81 



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82 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

STREET SPRINKLING ASSESSMENTS 

1921 1922 Total 

Balance Dec. 31, 1921 . . 7,986 55 7,986 55 

Committed, 1922 . . . 45,199 56 45,199 56 

Refunds 31 26 31 26 

Total charges . . 7,986 55 

Collected 7,971 73 

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Total credits . . . 7,986 55 37,684 40 45,670 95 
Balance Dec. 31, 1922 . . 7,546 42 7,546 42 



45,230 82 

87,492 94 

191 46 


63,217 37 

45,464 67 

206 28 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OP TAXES. 



83 



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ANNUAL REPORTS. 





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86 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REVENUE LOANS 



In anticipation of Revenue 



Balance from 1921 

Borrowed iby authority of an order of -the 



$585,000 00 



Board of Aldermen 


on city notes, as 






follows : 












Nos. 991 63 i 


lays 


@ 4.00 disc. 




$18,000 00 


992-994 280 


»» 


4.00 


. 




25,000 00 


995-1002 275 


it 


4 1-10 


. 




75,000 00 


1003-1004 308 


n 


4 1-10 


. 




40,000 00 


1005-1017 259 


tt 


4.20 


$1.75 prean 


200,000 00 


1018-1026 217 


»> 


4.05 






100,000 00 


1027-1032 219 


>» 


4.05 


8.00 


■i 


200,000 00 


1033-1030 196 


>» 


3.74 


6.00 


»» 


200,000 00 


1037-1048 179 


>» 


3.45 


3.50 


n 


200,000 00 


1049-1052 167 


»» 


3.33 


. 




200,000 00 


1053-1063 166 


»» 


3.298 


. 




100,000 00 


1066-1067 174 


>» 


3.37 


2.75 


»» 


100,000 00 


1068-1079 168 


»» 


3.39 


. 




200,000 00 


1080-1082 190 


>» 


4 1-8 


5.00 


* j 


100,00 00 
L758,000 00 



Paid notes maturing in 1922 
Maturing in 1923 . 



Discount paid on amount borrowed in 1922 was 

Amount paid in 1922 on notes of 1921, interest 
to follow, (this amount reserved and brought 
forward to credit of 1922 account) . 



1922 Notes average 201 days, and average rate 

of discount 3.79 

Average of 1921, 197.42 days, rate . 5.545 



$2,343,000 00 
1,843,000 00 

$ 500,000 00 
$37,195 81 

5,181 25 
$42,377 06 



The funded debt December 31, 1922, was 
classified as follows: 



$1,459,000.00 



City Loan Bonds at 3^ per -cent. 
City Loan Bonds at 4 per cent. 
City Loan Bonds at 4*4 per cent. 
Sewer Loan Bonds at 3% per cent. 

Carried forward 



$16,000 

171,000 

10,000 

50,000 



00 
00 
00 
00 



$247,000 00 $1,459,000 00 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OP TAXES. 



87 



Brought forward 



Sewer Loan Bonds at 4 per cent. . 
Sewer Loan, Bonds at 4)4 per cent. . 
Met. Park Asat. Loan Bonds at 3% per cent. 
Lowell Street Bridge Loan Bonds at 3% per 

cent. 

Municipal Loan Bonds at 3*& per cent. 
Highway Loan Bonds at 3% per cent. . 
Highway Loan Bonds at 4 per cent. . 
Highway Loan Bonds at 4^ per cent . 
Highway Loan Bonds at 5 per cent. . 
Pub. Bldg. Loan Bonds at 4 per. cent. 
Pub. Bldg. Loan Bonds at 4% per cent. 
Schoolhouse Loan Bonds at 4 per cent. 



$247,000 $1,459,000 00 

117 000 00 

21,000 00 

7,000 00 

27,000 00 
7,000 00 

30,000 00 
104,000 00 

28,000 00 

85,000 00 
146,000 00 

65,000 00 
&75.000 00 



$1,459,000 00 



Funded debt beyond the limit fixed by law 



City Loan . 

Municipal Loan . 

Highway Loan . 

Public Building Loan 

Sewer Loan 

Lowell Street Bridge Loan 

Schoolhouse Loan 



$197,000 00 




7,000 00 




247,000 00 




211,000 00 




179,000 00 




27,000 00 




575,000 00 




i 


1,443,000 00 



Funded debt beyond the limit fixed by law : 



Sewer Loan (Chap. 357, Acts 1895 . 

Met. Park Aast. Loan (Chap. 325, Acts 1902) 



$9,000 00 
7,000 00 



16,000 00 
$1,459,000 00 



BONDS DUE IN 1923 



Metro. Park 

Bridge 

Sewer 

Oity 

Municipal 

Highways 

Buildings 

Schoolhouse 



r anuary 


April 


July 
$1,000 


October 


Total 
$1,000 


$1,000 




1,000 


$3,000 
2,000 


$9,000 
24,000 


9,000 
13,500 
7,000 
2,000 
8,000 


$2,000 


21,000 

41,500 

7,000 


8,000 


36,000 

5,000 

17,000 




46,000 


5,000 




18,000 




13,000 


30,000 




$13,000 


$92,000 


$40,500 


$15,000 


$165,500 



88 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



BOND INTEREST DUE IN 1923 



Met. Park 


January 
$ 122 50 


April 


July 
$' 122 50 


October 


Total ' 
$ 245 00 


Bridge . 

Sewer . 

City 

Municipal 

Highway 

Building 

SchOolhouse . 


$ 472 50 
2,671 25 
1,932 50 


$ 455 00 
2,495 00 
1,450 00 


927 50 


990 00 

1,980 00 

157 50 

685 00 

3,222 50 


935 00 

1,940 00 

157 50 

545 00 

3,122 50 


7,091 25 

7,302 60 

315 00 


4,675 00 

1,160 00 

11,500 00 


3 895 00 

l',060 00 

11,160 00 


9,800 00 

8,565 00 

22,660 00 











$7,157 50 $22,411 25 $6,822 50 $20,515 00 $56,906 25 



BONDS OUTSTANDING JANUARY 1, 1923 



With Interest to Maturity 



Metropolitan Park 

Lowell Street Bridge 

Sewer . 

City 

Municip/al 

Highway 

Public Buildings 

Schoolhouses 



Bonds 


Interest 


Total 


$7,000 00 


$980 00 


$7 980 00 


27,000 00 


12,757 50 


39,757 50 


188,000 00 


48,521 25 


236,521 25 


197,000 00 


32,082 50 


229,082 50 


7,000 00 


315 00 


7,315 00 


247,000 00 


38,250 00 


285 250 00 


211,000 00 


57,235 00 


268,235 00 


575,000 00 


231,500 000 


806,500 00 


$1,459,000 00 


£421,641 25 


$1,880,641 25 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OP TAXES. 



89 



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90 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Yearly Bond Maturities with Interest 



Date Due 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926..... 

1927 

1928 

1929...„ 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933U. 

1934 

1935 

1936 

1937 

1938 

1939 

1940 

1941 

1942 

1943 ..... 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 



Principal 


Interest 


Total 


$165,500 00 


$56,906 26 


$222,406 25 


141,500 00 


50,391 25 


191,891 26 


128,000 00 


44,903 75 


172,903 75 


114,000 00 


39,938 75 


153,938 76 


104,000 00 


35,401 25 


139,401 25 


95,000 00 


31,263 75 


126,268 75 


93,000 00 


27,376 25 


120,376 26 


86,000 00 


23,6)51 25 


109,651 25 


77,000 00 


20,313 75 


97,313 75 


67,000 00 


17,386 25 


84,386 25 


5*,000 00 


14,8/58! 76 


65,868 76 


51,000 00 


12,811 25 


63,811 25 


44,000 00 


10,863 75 


54,863 75 


39,000 00 


9,193 76 


48,193 75 


39,000 00 


7,621 25 


46,621 25 


33,000 00 


6,088 75 


39,088 75 


32,000 00 


4,796 25 


36,796 25 


31,000 00 


3,541 25 


34,641 26 


30,000 00 


2,323 75 


32,323 75 


30,000 00 


1,126 25 


31,126 25 


2,000 00 


248 75 


2,248 75 


1,000 00 


192 50 


1,192 50 


1,000 00 


157 50 


1,157 50 


1,000 00 


122 50 


1,122 50 


1,000 00 


87 50 


1,087 60 


1,000 00 


52 50 


1,052 50 


1,000 00 


17 50 


1,017 50 


$1,459,000 00 


$421,641 25 


$1,880,641 25 



BORROWING CAPACITY, DECEMBER 31, 1922 



Valuation, 1920 
Supplementary 

Valuation, 1921 
Suipplem entary 

Valuation, 1922 
Supplementary 



Total 
Abatements, 1920 . 
1921 . 
1922 



$83,910,855 60 
17,700 00 



86,718,289 60 
75,258 00 



88,158,139 27 
8,400 00 



493,150 00 
626,258 00 
358,500 00 



$83,928,555 60 



86,793,547 60 



88,166,539 27 
258,888,642 47 



1,477,908 00 
$257,410,734 47 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



91 



Average three years, one-third 

Two and onenhaUlf per cent. 
Funded Debt, Dec. 31, 1922 

Outside limit fixed by law: 
Sewer Doan, 1895, Chap. 357 . 9,000 00 
Met. Pari; Loan, Chap. 325, '02 7,000 00 



Loans authorized, not (issued . 



(Borrowing capacity, Dec. 31, 1928 . 
Maturities: 

January 1, 1922 

April 1, 192*2 . 

July 1, 1922 . . . 40,500 00 

Less outside limit . . 4,000 00 



October 1, 1922 

Maturities within limit, 1922 
Maturities outside liimtit, 1922 



1,459,000 00 



16,000 00 

1,443,000 00 
300,000 00 



$18,000 00 
92,000 00 



36,500 00 
15,000 00 

161,500 00 
4,000 00 

165,500 00 



85,803,678 16 
$2,145,089 46 



1,743,000 00 
$402,089 45 



MEMORANDUM! OF PAYMENTS IN 1922 ON ACCOUNT OF DEBT 





Principal 


Interest 


Total 


Bonds, General City Debt . 


$169,500 00 


$43,939 58A 


$213,439 58 


Revenue Loans, 1921 . 




5,181 25B 


5,181 25 


1922 . 




37,195 81 


37,195 81 


Grade 'Crossings . 


4,380 00 


298 49 


4,678 49 


On account of 








Metropolitan District Debt 








Sewers .... 


21,647 12 


30,741 39 


52,388 61 


Park . ... 


S,466> 20 


14,921 71 


18,387 91 


Wellington Bridge 


1,265 00 


177 10 


1,442 10 


Charles -River Basin . 


310 09 


3,594 42 


3,904 51 


Alewife Brook . 


818 39 


264 98 


1,083 37 


Water .... 


13,702 27 


77,490 17 


91,192 44 


ISomerville's proportion 








for debt requirements: 








In State Tax 


25,159 56 


28,772 75 


53,932 31 


In County Tax . 


2,933 56 


3,725 15 


6,668 71 




$243,182 19 


$246,302 80 


$489,484 99 



A — $2,291.67 accrued interest applied as reduction. 

B — This amount reserved in 1921 and brought forward to 1922 for interest 
1921 notes, interest to follow. 



92 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



GRADE CROSSING DEBT 
(Carried by Commonwealth) 



Decrees entered 

Paid Commonwealth . 

Deduct interest included in above 



Payable 
Nov. 15, 1923 



$139,067 50 
22,350 40 



Principal 
$3,380 00 



$120,097 10 

116,717 10 
3,380 00 

Interest 
$127 20 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 1922 



Appropriated in budget 
Transfer 



Salaries: 

Treasurer and Collector 

Deputy Collector 

Cashiers .... 

Clerks . ' . . . 
Stationery, postage and books 
Printing and advertising . 
Telephone .... 
Tracing taxpayers 
Bonds . . . . 
Machines and repairs . 
Advertising and recording' tax sales 
Sundries 



Balance 



$4^000 00 

2,000 00 

2,539 50 

8,249 42 

2,395 59 

682 16 

144 50 

100 00 

386 57 

162 68 

325 98 

60 95 

21,047 35 

2 65 



$20,750 00 
300 00 

$21,050 00 



21,050 00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 93 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Thomas M. Durell, M. D., President, 1925 
J. Frank Wellington, Vice-President, 1923 
Frederick W. Parker, 1924 Herbert E. Buffum, M. D., 1923 

William L. Barber, 1925 Giles W. Bryant, M. D., 1924 

Charles L. Noyes, D. D., 1923 David H. Fulton, 1924 
Frank M. Barnard, 1922 Albert L. Haskell, 1925 



COMMITTEES. 

On Administration. 

The President, Messrs. Wellington, Parker, Noyes, Buffum and Fulton. 

On Books and Cataloguing. 

The President, Messrs. Barber, Buffum, Bryant and Barnard. 

On Buildings and Property. 
The President and the Vice-President. 



Secretary of the Board. 

George H. Btans. 



94 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

ORGANIZATION OF LIBRARY AND 8TAFF PERSONNEL. 

George Hill Evans, Librarian. 

Nellie M. Whipple, Assistant Librarian. 

Vivian J. Morse, Executive Assistant. 



CENTRAL LIBRARY AND LIBRARIAN'S OFFICE. 
Highland Avenue and Walnut Street. 

GRADED SERVICE. 

Department Heads and Special Positions. 

Cora B. Eames. Reference Librarian and Second Assistant 

Gladys B. Hastings, Supervisor of Children's Work. 

Nelly Gumming, Chief Cataloguer 

Edna C. Woodbury, High School Librarian 

Mary S. Woodman, Reviewer and Classifier 

Myrtle Nicholson, Supervisor of Periodicals and Binding 

Lucy W. Harris, School Librarian 

Orpha B. Matheson, Reference Assistant 

Senior Assistants. 

Desk Chief 

Assistant Cataloguer 



Winnifred S. Russell, Circulation Department 
Marion J. Meserve, Circulation Department 
Eleanor M. Dean, Circulation Department 



Junior Assistants. 

Jean P. Hennessy, Children's Room 
Alice W. Hamilton, Children's Room 
Mildred A. Bowley, Circulation Department 



Ungraded Service. 

Louise R. Joyce, Catalog Department 
Ruth M. Hayes, Page 
Lillian M. Gould, Page 



Attendants on Part Time. 



Arthur Hayes 
Ralph H. Hatfield 
Wilmot W. Jones 



PUIiLir LIBRARY 05 

WEST 30MERVILLE BRANCH. 

Established 1909. 
40 College Avenue. 



GRADED SERVICE. 

Esther M. Mayhew, Branch Librarian 
Mabel E. Bunker, First Assistant 



Senior Assistants. 

Ruth L. Swett 

Dorothy H. Terry 

Muriel Stowell. Circulation Department 

Edna L. Hartwell, Circulation Department 



> Children's Librarian 



Junior Assistant. 
Irma Traphagen, Circulation Department 

UNGRADED SERVICE. 

Page 



Attendants on Part Time. 

Marston C. Sargent Richard J. Walsh 

Grace Pigved Mildred Moses.. 



EAST SOMERVILLE BRANCH. 

Established 1912. 
Broadway and Illinois Avenue. 

GRADED SERVICE. 

Dorothy B. Spear, Branch Librarian 



Senior Assistants. 

Dorothy S. Bamford } Assistant 
Ruth G. Markle ( * irbt Asslstant 
Children's Librarian 



Junior Assistants. 

Circulation Department 



UNGRADED SERVICE. 

Attendants on Part Time. 

Gladys Murley Audrey S. Merrow 

Gertrude McGlinhcy M. Edna Petrie 



96 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

UNION SQUARE BRANCH. 

Established 1912. 

Washington Street and Bonner Avenue. 

GRADED SERVICE. 

Alice G. Worthen, Branch Librarian 

Senior Assistants. 

Marguerite C. Lane, First Assistant 
Katherine I. Eaton, Children's Librarian 

Junior Assistant. 

Circulation Department 



UNGRADED SERVICE. 
Leola Strout, Page 

Attendants on Part Tim* 

Dorothy A. Jones Richard Pierce 

Esther Cohen Fannie Spivack 

Charles Kelijcy 



MEMBERS OF THE TRAINING CLASS. 

E. Marion Akerley Corinne Mead 

Helen W. Farrar .Alice D. Williams 

Elsie L. Knox 



NOTE: For changes in staff personnel during the year see Librarian's 
Report. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 97 



Report of the Trustees 



To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville: 

Gentlemen: The fiftieth annual report of the trustees 
of the public library is herewith respectfully submitted; being 
the report of the librarian and tables of statistics of opera- 
tion. 

Very respectfully, 

The Board of Trustees, by 

Thomas M. Durell, 

President. 



98 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 

Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees: 

The fiftieth annual report of the Somerville Public 
Library, for the year 1922, is herewith submitted. 

A semi-centennial year is deemed by common consent an 
appropriate time to pause in the pursuit of any enterprise 
and to review its progress. The following account of the 
founding of our library, and of the more important features 
of its development, are therefore incorporated in this report 
for the convenient information and use of the citizens of 
Somerville who are the library's patrons and supporters. 



FOUNDING OF THE LIBRARY 

The great movement that swept the country in the nine- 
teenth century, based upon an insistent demand for educa- 
tional facilities to supplement the decidedly limited and for- 
mal program of the public schools, ultimately crystallized 
into the free public library of today. Its first manifestations 
appeared shortly after the American and French revolutions 
had spread broadcast the new ideas of freedom and enlighten- 
ment. Hundreds of association libraries were founded by 
pooling personal resources. They flourished for a time, some 
to disappear, others to grow strong and become permanent. 
The second phase of the movement, municipal recognition of 
the library as a necessary component of the public education- 
al establishment, and its consequent support by taxation, first 
showed itself as early as 1833, but did not begin to make 
real headway until the middle of the century. 

Great impetus was given to the movement by the found- 
ing of the Boston Public Library in 1854. During the decade 
of the sixties the project of instituting a public library in 
the town of Somerville was discussed by progressive citizens. 
Foremost and most persistent among its advocates was Ed- 
ward E. Edgerly. Due largely to his efforts the growing sen- 
timent was crystallized into action in 1869. The first defi- 
nite step was taken by Henry M. Brown, acting as the repre- 
sentative of the Someirville High School Association, who in 
that year wrote to the Board of Selectmen and to the School 
Board inviting these bodies to co-operate with the High 
School Association in the establishment of a public library. 
The selectmen appointed a committee of three to confer with 
a similar committee from the association. The joint com- 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 99 

mittee consisted of Austin Belknap, Horace Haskins, and 
Francis Houghton, selectmen, and Edward C. Booth, Henry 
M. Brown, and George S. Littlefield, of the association. The 
same committee was reappointed the following year and pre- 
pared a plan for founding and operating a public library. In 
accordance with this plan the executive committee of the 
High School Association and the Board of Selectmen held 
a joint meeting and elected the following Board of Trustees, 
three each from the Board of Selectmen, the High School 
Association, and the citizens of the town at large, namely: 
Austin Belknap, Henry M. Brown, Samuel A. Carlton, 
Horace P. Hemenway, Oren S. Knapp, John P. Marshall, Ed- 
win Mills, Frank H. Raymond, and Columbus Tyler. 

At a town meeting held April 29, 1871, the town ''Voted, 
that a free library be established" and appointed a committee 
consisting of the above-named board, and Russell H. Conwell, 
Joshua H. Davis, Samuel C. Hunt, George S. Littlefield, Rev. 
Charles Lowe, Isaac Pitman, and Quincy A. Vinal, "to re- 
port a plan for operating the same." 

The committee was at first organized with Rev. Charles 
Lowe, chairman, and George S. Littlefield, secretary. The 
absence in Europe of Messrs. Lowe and Marshall led to the 
substitution in their places of Rev. G. W. Durell and John 
R. Poor. Austin Belknap was elected chairman in place of 
Mr. Lowe. The report of the committee embodying its plan 
for a library was adopted by the town meeting of November 
7. 1871. 

October 21, 1872, the town having in the meantime been 
granted a city charter, the City Council elected the following 
Board of Trustees of the Public Library: For three years, 
John P. Marshall, Austin Belknap, Charles A. Guild; for 
two years, Quincy A. Vinal, Michael J. Canavan, Edward C. 
Booth : for one year, George O. Brastow, William H. Furber, 
and Selwyn Z. Bowman. On November 14, following, the 
new board organized by the election of John P. Marshall, 
president, and Edward C. Booth, secretary. On November 
19 Isaac Pitman was elected librarian, and on May 1, 1873, 
the library was opened in a room in the City Hall now occu- 
pied as the office of the Board of Assessors. There were upon 
the shelves at the time of opening 2,384 volumes. 



TRUSTEES 

For membership on the Board of Trustees Somerville has 
always demanded her best, and they have generously re- 
sponded by devoting time and intelligent study to the pro- 



100 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

duction of the best possible service. The list is a long and 
honorable one. It is possible to give here only the names 
of the presidents of the board and their respective terms 
of service: 

John P. Marshall, 1872 - 1875 

Charles H. Guild, 1875 - 1876 

W. G. Tousey, 1876 - 1880 

Henry H. Barber, 1881 - 1883 

Charles S. Lincoln, 1884 - 1899 

Charles A. West, 1900 - 1906 

Edward C. Booth, 1906 - 1909 

Thomas M. Durell, 1910 - 



LIBRARIANS 

The first librarian, Mr. Pitman, served in that capacity 
until June 1, 1875. Before his appointment he had been a 
partner in a mercantile house in Boston, and his business ex- 
perience doubtless stood him in good stead in laying well 
the foundations. 

He was succeeded by his assistant, Miss Harriet A. 
Adams, who for eighteen years tirelessly carried on the work. 
On June 1, 1893, she was succeeded by John S. Hayes. Mr. 
Hayes had previously been a teacher. He was a man of cul- 
ture, a book-lover, and happily possessed the additional qual- 
ities of energy and enthusiasm. The library throve under 
his direction. It was by his initiative that relations were 
established with the public schools, and that the Library 
Bulletin was started. His sudden death on March 7, 1898, 
was felt as a great loss. On May 16, following, Sam Walter 
Foes was elected librarian. 

It detracts nothing from the record of faithful and effi- 
cient services of other holdelrs of the office to say that Mr. 
Foss was by far the most notable of all Somerville's librar- 
ians. His name was already a household word among the 
American people, who knew and loved his homely verses. 
He was a shining exception to the proverb that "A prophet is 
not without honor, save in his own country," for he enjoyed 
the crowning distinction of being beloved in his own com- 
munity. His administration was marked by a great expan- 
sion of library privileges and, consequently of the popular use 
of the library. He died February 26, 1911. 

May 5, 1911, Drew Bert Hall succeeded to the office of 
librarian. Mr. Hall came to Somerville from the Millicent 
Library, of Fairhaven, Mass. He was a graduate of Bowdoin 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 101 

College, and of the New York State Library School. During 
his incumbency the! present Central building and the East 
Somerville Branch building were built, the methods of admin- 
istration were brought to the forefront of modern library prac- 
tice, and the privileges further liberalized. May 1, 1917, Mr. 
Hall resigned, and was commissioned captain in the United 
State army, in which capacity he served through the war. 

The present incumbent, George H. Evans, became libra- 
rian May 1, 1917. He is a graduate of Dartmouth College, and 
had previously been connected with the libraries of that in- 
stitution, of Brooklyn, N. Y., and of Woburn, Mass. 



LIBRARY BUILDINGS 

The library outgrew its original quarters in the City Hall 
after an occupancy of twetoty years, during which enlarge- 
ments had used up all the available room. In the years 1883- 
84 the first Central Library building was erected on a lot 
next to the City Hall. Exclusive of land the cost was $28,- 
338.45. The new building was dedicated by appropriate exer- 
cises, the principal feature of which was an address by Jus- 
tin Winsor, librarian of Harvard College, and undoubtedly 
the leader of the American library profession. In 1895 the 
library was enlarged by the addition of a steel stack. 

By 1911 the housing problem had again become so acute 
that the trustees took active steps to secure another building. 
As a result of their efforts the city agreed to take the old 
building for city offices, making for it an allowance of $45,000, 
to which Mr. Carnegie added $80,000. Edward L. Tilton, of 
New York City, was appointed architect. Mr. Tilton was 
already a successful designer of libraries, among others to 
his credit being the beautiful structure in Springfield. The 
new building is the result of careful study of administrative 
problems, and so successfully were they solved that the Cen- 
tral Library has earned a national reputation. It is frequent- 
ly visited, and its plans studied by Boards of Trustees who 
are planning buildings. It was dedicated December 17, 1913, 
and opened for public use in January following. 

On May 27, 1909, the building which houses the West 
Somerville Branch Library was opened for the accommoda- 
tion of the people of the rapidly growing west end of the city. 
The cost of erection and furnishings, $25,000, was met by a 
gift from Andrew Carnegie. The dedicatory address was 
made by Horace G. Wadlin, Librarian of the Boston Public 
Library. Its circulation rivals that of the Central Library. 



102 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The East Somerville Branch Library was first opened 
February 1, 1912, in a rented store at 153 Perkins Street. 
The patronage was immediate and large. After a few years 
the Carnegie Foundation came to the aid of the city and pro- 
vided the sum of $18,000 for a building, and on March 30, 
1918, its present modern and attractive building was opened 
at the corner of Broadway and Illinois Avenue. The open- 
ing of the new building was immediately followed by a large 
increase in registered borrowers and circulation. 

On March 4, 1912, the Union Square Branch was opened 
in one half of the first floor of the old Prospect Hill school- 
house at the corner of Bonner Avenue and Washington Street. 
It now occupies the entire floor, and in spite of having been 
doubled in capacity it can offer standing room only during 
afternoon and evening hours. In addition to a goodly num- 
ber of adults it has a daily attendance in school term of from 
400 to 800 children. 



TRUST FUNDS 

Hie Isaac Pitman Funds 

The Isaac Pitman funds were established by Mr. Pit- 
man's daughter, Harriet M. Loughlin, in memory of her fath- 
er.. In 1897 she gave $1,000, known as the Isaac Pitman 
Poetry Fund, the income to be eixpended for the purchase 
of poetry. In 1900 she also established the Isaac Pitman Art 
Fund by the gift of f 4,000, the income of which is to be ex- 
pended by the "Trustees at their discretion in the purchase 
for the use of the library of works of art, illustrative, decora- 
tive, or otherwise." A condition of the deeds of gift of ooth 
these funds is that "The annual appropriation by the City 
Council for the use of the Library shall not be diminished 
in consequence of the donation." 

The Wilder Children's Fund 

In 1908 flOO was given by Frances A. Wilder, a former 
teacher in Somerville schools, to establish a fund, the income 
of which is to be used for the purchase of children's books. 

The Martha R. Hunt Funds ' 

These funds were established in 1911 by the gift of $15,- 
000 from Martha R. Hunt. Of this amount it is directed 
that $3,000 shall be expended by the Trustees for art purposes 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 103 

for the Library, and shall be known as the Martha R. Hunt 
Fund, Art. The remaining $12,000 shall be known as the 
Martha R. Hunt Fund, Books. From it the income only may 
be used for the purchase of books. 

S. Newton Cutler Fund 

This fund was established in 1912 by a legacy of $1,000 
from S. Newton Cutler. The income only is to be used for 
the purchase of books. 

The Arthur A. Smith Fund 

This fund of $5,000 was established in 1920 by bequest of 
Arthur A. Smith, of Somerville. The income is to be at the 
disposal of the Trustees. This fund is not yet available. 



LIBRARY SERVICE 

The library is a constituent part of the educational estab- 
lishment of the city. As such it aims to maintain a great 
reservoir of information, with trained and efficient experts 
to administer it, which shall provide material for students 
and workers in all walks of life. It affords a continuation 
school for those who are ambitious to supplement a limited 
or defective education. It is a laboratory for study and re- 
search. It is a community centre for the betterment of social 
conditions, and the making of intelligent American citizens. 
It offers a centre of sane recreation for leisure hours. It is 
not possible to estimate or to measure by finite units the re- 
sults of such work. They are expressed only in higher stand- 
ards of life. Nevertheless attention may be called to certain 
significant figures. It is estimated that not less than 30,000 
citizens are either occasional or habitual users of the library. 
There are at their disposal 115,000 volumes in four convenient- 
ly located buildings. During its half-century of service the 
library has made home loans of books to the people of Somer- 
ville of more than 12,000,000 volumes. This is outside work, 
and does not take into account the vast amount of study and 
research done within its walls. Such a figure is beyond the 
power of the human mind to grasp. Who can doubt the benef- 
icent results of the stimulation of the ambition, the intelli- 
gence, and the bettered ideals of life of the individual, so 
many times multiplied? 



104 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

THE YEAR 1922 

The record of the year 1922 does not differ materially 
from that of the years immediately preceding it, save that 
there is evident a slow recovery from the impairment of ser- 
vice occasioned by war conditions. The problem of staff re- 
cruitment is perhaps less difficult, due largely to the success 
of the Training Class, to which specific reference will be made 
in later paragraphs. Great credit is due those members of 
the staff who, in the face of substantial and even flattering 
offers from other sources, have stood by through the trying 
times and kept the framework of our organization intact with 
a steady purpose and a superb loyalty beyond praise. The 
thanks of our citizens who use the library, and of many others 
who, though they use it but little believe in it as an educa- 
tional force, are due to the Mayor and City Council for the 
restoration of an appropriation for book purchase sufficient to 
arrest the decline of our collection. 



THE STAFF 

Changes in the personnel of the staff during the year 
are as follows: appointments to the Graded Service; Nelly 
Cumming, Cataloguer in charge of the department, Winni- 
fred Smith Russell, Senior Assistant at Central, Jean P. Hen- 
nessy, Junior Assistant at Central, Ruth G. Markle, formerly 
in our service, 1st Assistant at East Branch ; from the Train- 
ing Class, Mildred A. Bowley and Alice W. Hamilton, Junior 
Assistants at Central, Irma Traphagen, Junior Assistant at 
West Branch, Eleanor Atherton, Senior Assistant at East 
Branch; in the Ungraded Service, Louise Joyce at Central 
and E. Leola Srout at Union Square Branch. Elsie K. Wells, 
Senior Assistant, and Arthur Hayes, Page, were temporarily 
employed at Central. 

The library has received the resignations of Edna C. 
Woodbury, High School Librarian, Lucy W. Harris, School 
Librarian, Clara S. Hawes, Cataloguer, Dorothy S. Bamford, 
1st Assistant at East Branch, Ruth L. Swett, Children's Libra- 
rian at West Branch, Eleanor A. Randall, Senior Assistant at 
Central, Eleanor Atherton, Senior Assistant at East Branch, 
and Bernice L. Watt, in the Ungraded Service at Central. 

The following promotions have been made in regular 
course under the provisions of the Scheme of Service: Kather- 
ine I. Eaton to Children's Librarian at Union Square Branch, 
Lucy W. Harris to the First Grade in the School Department 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



105 



and Orpha B. Matheson in the Reference Department, Marion 
J. Meserve, Eleanor A. Randall, Muriel Stowell, and Eleanor 
M. Dean to the Second Grade. 

Two changes of organization deserve mention. All work 
with the graded and Junior High schools has been merged 
with the Children's Department. This department will now 
have five units, namely; the division of graded and Junior 
High schools, the Central children's room, and the children's 
room in each of the three branches. Miss Gladys Hastings 
has been promoted to the head of the department, with the 
title of Supervisor of Children's Work. In addition to the 
general supervision of the department, she retains the posi- 
tion of Children's Librarian at Central, and also conducts the 
instruction in children's work with the Training Class. Her 
promotion is a recognition well-earned by work of consist- 
ently high order both in spirit and performance. 

The Somerville High School and the library have dis- 
solved financial partnership in the employment of the High 
School Librarian, which has been taken over by the High 
School. The library will continue to place its resources free- 
ly at the disposal of High School students and teachers. 
Edna C. Woodbury, High School Librarian, formerly attached 
to our staff, therefore becomes a member of the city school de- 
partment. 



INSTRUCTION OF SCHOOL CHILDREN 

A concerted attempt is being made by school and library 
to carry over from school life into the succeeding years the 
idea that the library is a source of information and help upon 
all problems common to our daily life, as well as an agency 
for culture and recreation. This idea is inculcated not mere- 
ly by the home loans of books from the school rooms, but is 
definitely taught to the pupils. Instruction in the use of 
the library begins in the Junior High schools. Members of 
the upper class meet instructors from the library either at 
the library or at the school. They are told the simple ways 
of finding material by use of the catalogue and reference 
books. Supplementing this class instruction are illustrative 
test problems. When the same pupils reach the High School 
the following year they are given some review of this together 
with additional instruction in continuation. Visits to the 
library are also made by groups from the High School under 
guidance of the High School Librarian. The latter comes to 
the Central Library every afternoon after school where she 



106 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

is ready to meet and assist pupils whose work sends them 
here. The result of these efforts is becoming evident in an 
increasing intelligence in the pupils' use of the library. 



NOTABLE ADDITIONS 

The Trust Funds were given by their donors to enable 
the library to make purchases of an unusual nature which it 
could not reasonably hope to make from the ordinary appro- 
priations allowed by the city. Thereby they perform a valu- 
able service. During the past year notable additions have 
been derived from this source. The impoverishment of many 
of the educated people of England due to the war has brought 
into the market some exceptional offerings. Our library has 
been able to secure from the sale of a private library in Eng- 
land a set of four quarto volumes containing reproductions 
of the portraits painted by the famous English artists, Thomas 
Gainsborough, Sir Joshua Reynolds, and Sir Henry Rae- 
burn. In the same manner we also picked up in three portfo- 
lios the complete etchings of Rembrandt, over 1,600 in num- 
ber. Another interesting addition is the purchase from the 
well-known house of Alinari, of Florence, Italy, of eighty-six 
copies of famous paintings mostly from Italian galleries and 
churches These are not produced by any of the usual litho- 
graphic processes, nor are they colored after printing. They 
are actual color photographs. The colors are undoubtedly 
truer to the originals, inasmuch as they do not depend for 
accuracy upon the human eye, but upon a purely scientific 
process which registers the actual color values. None of these 
expensive books may be taken from the library, but they may 
be used freely by responsible people within the building. 

The library is also indebted to the family of the late 
S. Newton Cutler, donor of one of our funds, for a gift from 
his library of 193 volumes; also to Dr. Charles L. Noyes, for 
many years until his recent retirement an active and valued 
member of the Board of Trustees, for the gift of 225 volumes. 



FIRE RISK AND INSURANCE 

After many years of good fortune the library suffered 
the loss of 265 volumes by fire and water damage while at 
the bindery. A reasonably satisfactory adjustment of the loss 
was effected by compromise but the episode served to call at- 
tention to the general subject of fire risks. After consider- 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 107 

ation of the subject the Trustees directed the Librarian to 
place insurance upon library books while at the bindery, and 
also upon the collection housed in the Union Square building, 
a wooden structure. Two policies have accordingly been se- 
cured, one of |5,000 upon the Union Square collection, and 
one of f 1,000 upon books while at the bindery. 



THE TRAINING CLASS 

The Training Class began its course of instruction on 
Monday, October 2, with the following members: E. Marion 
Akerley, Helen Farrar, Elsie L. Knox, Corinne Mead, and 
Alice D. Williams. This is an intensive study course of 
twenty-six weeks, with illustrative practice work. A brief 
summary of the courses of instruction may be of interest. 

American literature to 1870. 20 lectures by Prof. R. E. 
Rogers of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Reference work and source books of knowledge. 24 class 
sessions with illustrative and test work. 

Miss Barnes. 

Children's work. 24 class sessions with illustrative and test 
work. Reading and review of at leat 50 % of a selected 
list of 44 standard children's books. 

Miss Eastings. 

Operations of the charging desk. 12 class sessions with illus- 
trative and test work. 

Miss Whipple. 

Classification, cataloguing, accessioning and filing. 12 class 
sessions with illustrative and test work. 

Miss Bunker. 

Book review and selection. 12 class sessions with illustrative 
and test work. Credit given for attendance at John 
Claire Minot lectures. 

Miss Mayhew. 

Current events of the world. 12 class sessions. 

Mr. Evans. 

Penmanship and printing. 6 class sessions with additional 
practice work. 

Mr« Evans. 



108 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Book mending. 4 class sessions with additional practice 
work. 

Mr. Evans. 

Book binding for libraries. 3 class sessions with practice 
work in preparation of books for binding. 

Miss Nicholson. 

Care of periodicals. 3 class sessions. 

Miss Nicholson. 

Parts of a book and their significance. 3 class sessions with 
illustrative material on book making. 

Mr. Evans. 

Shelving and library arrangement of books. 2 class sessions 
with daily practice work throughout the course. 

Miss Bunker. 

Miscellaneous lectures on professional topics, such as; Libra- 
rianship as a profession. Ethics of the Librarian. 
Library history and development. Work of the State 
Commission. High School libraries. Welfare and 
citizenship work. Book ordering, and publishing 
houses. By various librarians. 
Branch work, — Not less than one month. 
Visits of inspection to typical libraries, including the Boston 
Public, Harvard, Massachusetts State, Boston Athenae- 
um, and important suburban libraries. 
Visits to book binderies, printing shops, publishing houses. 
Numerous professional readings as assigned. 
Keeping of complete note books is required. 

Very careful attention is given to the conduct of these 
courses. Admittedly elementary, they have been laid out and 
developed upon the basis of the actual demands of our daily 
work, and are therefore intensely practical. They are only 
too brief for their purpose, and there is a constant tendency 
to over-crowd them in the attempt to accomplish the utmost. 
Pupils without exception find that a considerable amount of 
outside work is necessary to maintain a satisfactory rank. 

For admission to the Training Class the applicant must 
be not younger than eighteen nor older than thirty, at least 
a high school graduate of creditable rank, of normal health 
and strength and possessed of unimpaired faculties, and with- 
out marked peculiarities of temperament. She must pass an 
examination of High School graduate standard, including al- 
so general information relative to current affairs of the world 
and particularly of our own country. College graduates are 



ri.TBLIC LIBIiARY 



109 



exempt from educational tests. The final rating is based 40 % 
upon examination and 60% upon reports of daily work dur- 
ing the course. Students who pass with a rating of 75% or 
more are eligible to appointment to the library staff as vacan- 
cies occur. High School graduates to the Third Grade of the 
service, and College graduates to the Second Grade. Prefer- 
ence is given to Somerville residents both for admission to 
the class, and for appointment to the staff. 

Every year since the institution of the Training Class 
applications for the privilege of taking a single course of 
instruction, such as Keference work or Children's work, have 
been received from members of our staff whose appointment 
antedates the class, or who have come to us from another li- 
brary. It has been found toi our mutual advantage to encour- 
age these attempts at self -improvement by granting the time 
necessary. There is no doubt that the Training Class, in ad- 
dition to its function as a recruiting agency, is a most valu- 
able factor in the morale of our public service, making for 
harmony and a real conception of the spirit of service. 



PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION 

Of interest to librarians and trustees is the May issue 
of the Annals of the American Academy of Political and So- 
cial Science. The entire number is devoted to the consider- 
ation of professional and business ethics. Under each calling 
the prevailing ethical standards are expounded, discussed, 
and an attempt is made to codify them. Some of the codes 
presented are those that have been formally accepted and 
endorsed by representative organizations of the particular 
professions. It is a tribute to the progress of the library 
profession that it has been included by the Annals, a pub- 
lication representing the highest scholarship of America, in 
the same professional group with the clergy, law, medicine, 
architecture, teaching, engineering, and journalism. 



STATISTICS 

The usual tabulations of the statistics of operation for 
the year 1922, appended to this report, are submitted as a 
part of it. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George H. Evans, 

Librarian. 



110 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 





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PUBLIC LIBRARY 



111 



APPENDIX B 



American Library Association Form for Uniform Statistics 

Annual report for year ended December 31, 1922. 

Name of library: The Public Library of the City of Somerville, Mass. 

Cit.y: Somerville State: Massachusetts 

Name of librarian: George Hill Evans 

Date of founding 

Population served (latest estimate) .... 

Assessed valuation of city 

Rate of tax levy for library purposes: $0.67% on each 
$1000 valuation. 

Terms of use: Free for lending 

Free for reference 

Total number of agencies 

Consisting of Central Library .... 1 

Branches 3 

High iScho'ol Department . . 1 
School Rooms . . . 165 

Institutions 4 

Playgrounds 8 

Number of days open during year (Central Library) . 302 

Hours open each week for lending (Central Library) . 72 

Hours open each week for reading (Central Library) . 72 



1872 

97,000 

$88,166,539 27 



182 



INCREASE 

Number of volumes at beginning of year .... 111,815 
Number of volumes added during year by purchase . 8,222 
Number of volumes added during year by gift or ex- 
change 727 

Number of volumes added during year by binding mate- 
rial not otherwise counted 110 

Number of volumes added during year by lost books re- 
stored 29 

Number of volumes lost or withdrawn during year . 4,935 

Total number at end of year 115,968 



USE 

Number of volumes of fic- 
tion lent for home use 

Total number of volumes 
lent for home use 

Number of pictures, photo- 
graprs and prints lent 
for ' home use 



Adult 
214,742 
284,232 



Juvenile 
92,432 
165,644 



Total 
307,174 
449,876 

2,168 



REGISTRATION 



Number of borrowers reg- 


Adult 


Juvenile 


Total 


istered during year . 
Total number of registered 
borrowers 


4,223 
9,670 


3,563 
7,117 


7,786 
16,787 



112 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Registration period, years 

Number of periodicals and newspapers currently re- 
ceived : 

Titles 

•Copies 

Number of publications issued during year: 

Bulletins 

Special lists 

Number of staff, library service 

Number of staff, janitor service . . 



224 

490 

5 

3 

40 

6 



FINANCE 

Receipts from: 
City tax levy: 

Library Department 
Public Buildings Department 
Endowment Funds 

Fines 

Other sources (Dog licenses) . 



Total 



Payments for: 

Library Department: 

Books 

Periodicals 

Pictures 

Music 

Binding 

Salaries, library service 

Supplies 

Printing 

Telephone . . . 
Transportation, postage, express, 

freight, etc. . 
Other maintenance 



Total 



Public (Buildings Department: 
Salaries, janitor service 

Heat 

Light 

Furniture 

Permanent improvements 
Other maintenance 

Total 

Total maintenance 
Balance from Appropriation, Liibrary Dept 
Balance from Endowment Funds 
Balance from Appropriation, PuIbMc 

Buildings Department . 



$45,727 

12,850 

1,382 

2,348 

2,053 



72 
00 
55 
57 
71 



$ 9,792 93 

1,306 82 

146 20 

213 80 

2,695 71 

33,625 59 

890 98 

687 58 

288 56 



1,113 01 
503 18 



51,264 36 



6,855 91 

2,282 81 

2,070 90 

107 62 

541 67 

198 30 

12,057 21 

2 39 
245 80 

792 79 



$64,362 55 



$63,321 57 



Total balance 



$1,040 98 



SUPPORT OF POOR DEPARTMENT 113 



SUPPORT OF POOR DEPARTMENT. 



Board of Overseers of the Poor. 

Fbed E. Durgin, President. 

? Michael Coll, Vice-President. ! 

George C. Brayley 

Committees. 
On Finance, Investigation and Relief, and City Home 

Mr. Durgin, Mr. Coll and Mr. Brayley. 

Clerks. 
Josephine S. Philbrook Helen E. Linegab 

General Agent. 

William E. Copithorne. 

City Physician 
C Clarke Towle, M. D. 
Frank E. Bateman, M. D. (Appointed Oct. 11, 1922) 

Warden and Matron, City Home. 
Mb. and Mrs. J. Foster Colquhoun. 

Office. 
City Hall Annex, Highland Avenue. 



114 . ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Somerville, Mass., December 31, 1922. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen, — The Overseers of the Poor submit herewith 
reports of the General Agent, the Warden of the City Home 
and the City Physician, with tables showing the work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Fred E. Durgin, 

Michael Coll, 

George G. Brayley, 

Overseers 
of the 
Poor. 



Table No. 7. 



Expenditures in Detail for the Year 1922. 



1922 


Board. 


Dry 
Goods 

and 
Shoes. 


Burials. 


Somerville 

Poor in 
other Cities 
and Towns. 


Cash 
Paid 
Out. 


Somerville 

Poor in 

other Cities 

and Towns 

1913 Law. 


Cash 
Allowance 


Fuel. 


Groceries. 


Other 
Institu- 
tions. 


Med. Att. 

and 
Medicine 


Nursing. 


Stationery 

and 
Printing. 


Salaries. 


Somerville 
Hospital. 


State 
Institu- 
tions. 


Sundries. 


Telephone. 


Totals 


January 

February 

March 

April 


$229.35 
769.85 
562.65 
362.28 
225.49 
553.84 
376.78 
152.78 
162.14 
553.06 
189.17 
600.92 




$94.00 
41.40 
10.00 


$306.92 

75.43 

132.00 

141.36 

4.25 


$4,675.00 
4,544.36 
4,665.20 
5,637.00 
4,613.20 
4,516.00 
5,437.46 
4,318.01 
5,533.15 
4,322.00 
4,457.00 
5,471.00 


$1,095.33 
745.35 

501.88 

302.00 
230.35 


$28.79 
42.00 
45.65 
44.44 
54.51 
53.01 
54.51 
61.15 
59.44 
61.15 
59.44 
57.15 


$447.71 

333.77 

363.51 

37.64 


$398.00 
321.00 
322.43 
285.00 
167.00 
142.00 
98.00 
190.00 
165.81 
146.00 
134.00 
135.00 


$65.40 

63.85 

144.15 

5.25 

121.80 


$66.81 
13.06 
22.48 

55.28 


$12.00 
8.00 
3.50 


$ 8.40 
22.25 

8.50 
18.00 

3.00 

7.50 

12.25 

7.12 

10.75 

88.75 


$522.05 
522.05 
522.05 
610.98 
528 05 
528.05 
635.23 
553.05 
568.23 
528.05 
528.05 
620.91 


$444.00 
559.00 
767.00 
356.00 
620.00 
819.00 
858.00 
578.75 
425.75 
438.75 
461.50 
325.00 




$25.08 
12.50 
13.19 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 


$10.38 

11.06 

10.24 

10.81 

10.38 

8.29 

12.44 

10.20 

10.21 

13.95 

9.09 

8.69 


$8,429.22 
8,481.67 
8,094.43 
7,805.03 


$396.74 


228.49 


M?iv 


5.00 
74.00 


6.00 


6,673.18 










6,937.04 




979.08 

247.80 

1,028.39 

1,119.37 

166.00 








8.50 
2.00 


349.00 


8,829.00 


August 

September ... 


17.00 


2,505.67 
654.67 




18.00 
122.57 
21.00 
45.00 
35.00 




8,679.16 
8,751.48 




1.50 

7.50 

48.33 

10.50 




18.00 




2.50 
2.50 


833.00 


8,087.58 
6,180.58 


November 


234.00 
1,041.13 




December 








8,562.55 










Totals 


$4,738.31 




$259.40 


$4,190.60 


$58,189.38 


$7,310.38 


$621.24 


$1,182.63 


$2,504.24 


$642.02 


225.46 


$45.00 


$186.52 


$6,666.75 


$6,652.75 


$1,807.23 


$163.27 


$125.74 


$95,510.92 



SUPPORT OP POOR DEPARTMENT. 



115 



REPORT OF GENERAL AGENT 



City Hall Annex, January 1, 1923. 

To the Overseers of the Poor, Somerville, Mass: — 

Gentlemen: — The following as the report of the general 
agent for the year ending December 31, 1922 is herewith sub- 
mitted : — 



Table No. 1. 

FULL SUPPORT (During the year). 

In City Home (men 29, women 22) .... 
In City Home, DecemJber 31, 1922 .... 
In private families . . . . " 
In hospitals for the sick in other cities, towns and state 
In care of state division minor wards (children) . 



51 
35 
26 
65 
12 



Table No. 2. 

PARTIAL SUPPORT (Outside Relief). 

Families ......... 

Persons aided (including hospital cases) 
[Burials '. . . . . . .i 

Permits to State Infirmary 



249 

1016 

11 



Table No. 3. 

AID UNDER 1913 LAW (Mother's Aid). 

Numlber of applications from widows or deserted women 

Number of families aided at close of year 

Number of children ........ 

Amount allowed each family, from $4.00 to $20.00 per week 
Number of out-of-town families ..... 

Number having no settlement ..... 



82 

65 

284 

15 
19 



Cost to City 

Somerville settlement $22,131 06 

Settled in other cities and towns (reside here) . . 5,248 08 

State 10,719 19 

Somerville families living in other cities and towns . 7,310 38 



$45,408 71 



116 



ANNUAL RBPOETS. 



Table No. 4. REIMBURSEMENTS 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Oity of Beverly 
*' Boston 
" Brockton 
" " Cambridge 
" Chelsea 
" Everett 
" w Haverhill 
" Maiden 
" Medford 
M " Newton 
" iSaleni 
Town of Freetown 
" (Plymouth 
" Ware 
M Watertown 
** " Winchester 
Individual 



Table No. 5. SOMERVILLE HOSPITAL (CITY PATIENTS) 

Patients having settlement in Somerville 
Patients having settlement in other cities and towns 
Patients having no settlement (chargeable to (State) 
Total number of patients sent to hospital . 
Amount paid to hospital . 



^30,655 38 


45 


50 


2,219 18 


693 


05 


5,181 63 


58 


50 


552 


81 


24 


00 


138 


83 


971 92 


32 


00 


195 


74 


11 


15 


152 


00 


126 


00 


180 


00 


201 


12 


267 


85 


$41,706 


66 


TIE NTS) 






45 




24 




24 




93 


'. $6,652 75 









Table No. 6. 










POPULATION ANC 


) GROSS EXPENDITURES, 1900 to 1922 




Population 












Year 


(Estimated) 












1900 


— *61,643 


(iMisc. 


$23,697.62 


Home, 


$5,528.83) 


Total $ 29,226.45 


1901 


— 62,500 


tt 


29,171.15 


m 


6,622.43 


*t 


35,793.58 


1902 


— 63.500 


It 


28,667.04 


u 


7,396164 


tt 


36,063.68 


1903 


— 65,500 


u 


30,470.20 


i« 


7,548.39 


tt 


38,018.59 


1904 


— 69,5100 


*c 


20,476j54 


tt 


6^563,11 


it 


27,039.65 


1905 


— *60,/272 


*t 


17,527.88 


tt 


7,474.36 


tt 


25,002.24 


1906! 


— 72.000 


tt 


18,237.53 


<t 


6,806.79 


tt 


25,044.32 


1907; 


— 74,000 


r 


17,8152.20 


!" 


7,001.23 


a 


24,853.43 


1908 


— 75,-500 


n 


17,955,34 


tt 


6,875.56 


tt 


24,830.90 


1909 


— 75,500 


« 


16,843.17 


tt 


7,562.83 


HI 


24,406.00 


19101 


— *\?7,236 


tt 


16,110.42 


n 


7,!&9/5.89 


u 


23,806.31 


1911 


— 78,000 


u 


16,'327i56 


it* 


7,842.03 


tt 


24,169.59 


1912 


— 81,000 


u 


19,201,33 


tt 


8,998.97 


tt 


28,200.30 


1913 


— 82.000 


tt 


21,827.73 


u 


10,945.95 


tt 


32,773.68 


1914 


— 85,000 


u 


35,619.68 


** 


11,200.25 


tt 


46,819.93 


1915 


— i*86,864 


a 


45,490.98 


tt 


11,218.6/5 


at 


56,709.63 


1916 


— 90,000 


tt 


51/759.62 


a 


11,593.41 


tt 


63,353.03 


1917 


— 90,000 


a 


53,653.33 


tt 


13,417.77 


tt 


67,071.10 


1918 


— 90,500 


a 


63,420.48 


tt 


15,411.20 


tt 


78,831.68 


1919 


— 91,000 


«< 


67,682.53 


a 


15,789.34 


tt 


83,471.87 


1920 


— -*<93,033 


tt 


77,456j57 


tt 


17,308.29 


tt 


94;764.86 


1921 


— 95 t 000 


tt 


87,922.69 


*t 


15,069.81 


tt 


102,992.50 


1922 


— 97,000 


u 


95^510.92 


ti 


13,577.07 


tt 


109,087.99 


♦Census 















SUPPORT OF POOR DEPARTMENT. 



117 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR OF SOMERVILLE 



Since the reorganization In 1885. 



tHon. Mark F. Burns, chairman, ex-officio . 


1885 1888 inclusive 


tCoL Herbert B. Hill .... 


1885 1889 


tCbarles S. Lincoln, Esq., chairman . 


1885 1887 


tHon. Edward Glines .... 


1885 1887 


tCharles G. Brett (president 1888-1892) . 


1885 Apr. 1893 


Edward B. West (president May, 1894 




February, 1912) .... 


1888 to 1912 


fDaniel C. iStillson 


1888 Apr. 1892 


tHon. Charles G. Pope, chairman ex-officio . 


1889 1891 


fNathan H. Reed (president 1893 to April 




1894) 


1890 Apr. 1894 


tHon. William H. Hodgkins, chairman 




ex-officio . . . . . 


1892 1895 


tJames G. Hinckley . . . May, 


1892 1894 


tAlbert W. Edmands . . . May, 


1893 Oct. 1918 (Died) 


tHerbert E. Merrill . . . May, 


1894 1909 inclusive 


tEzra D. Souther 


1895 Feb. 1898 (Died) 


Hon. Albion A. Perry, chairman ex-officio . 


1896 1898 inclusive 


James H. Butler . . . March, 


1898 1899 


Hon. George O. Proctor, chairman, ex- 




officio ...... 


1899 


Henry F. Curtis, M. D 


1910 to 1921 


Philip Koen ...... 


1912 Nov. 9, 1916 " 


Michael Ooll . . . November, 


1916 to date* 


Fred" E. Durgin . . . October, 


1918 to date* 


George G. Brayley . . . January, 


1922 to date* inclusive 


Table No. 8. 


\ 


RECAPITULATION (Mlscel 


laneous) 


Expenditures and transfers . 


$95,610 92 


Reimbursements and refunds . 


42,075 03 


Net cost to city 


$53,436 89 


* Present member. 




t Deceased. 




• Present member. 




t Deceased. 





Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. E. Copithobni 

General Agent. 



118 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF WARDEN OF CITY HOME 



City Home, January 1, 1923. 

To the Overseers of the Poor, Somerville, Mass: — 

Gentlemen, — I submit the following as the report of the 
Warden of the City Home for the year ending December 31, 
1922:— 



Table No. 1. 

Number of weeks board of immates 
Number of males admitted during 1922 . 
Numlber of females admitted during 1922 . 
Nuimiber of males discharged during 1922 
Numlber of females discharged during 1922 
Number of males supported during 1922 
Number of females supported during 1922 
Number of males died during 1922 
Numlber of Females died during 1922 
Number of inmates in home, December 31, 1922 



1814-2 
11 

5 

6 
11 
29 
22 

6 

5 
35 



City Home Hospital. 

Number of week's board ...... 

Number of patients admitted ..... 

Number of patients in hospital, December 31, 1922 



466-1 
11 
8 



Table No. 2. 



Reimbursements 
Net expenditures 



Appropriation 
Balance 



. $6,477 71 
. 7,099 36 



. $14,560 00 
982 93 



$13,577 07 



$13,577 07 
Respectfully submitted, 

J. Poster Colquhoun, 

Warden. 



SUPPORT OF POOR DEPARTMENT. 119 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN 



Office of the City Physician, 
Sonierville, January 1, 1923. 

Gentlemen, — The work of your City Physician during the 

year J 922 is presented in the following abstract : — 



Office -consultations and treatments ..... 95 

Total outside visits 809 

Confinements ........ 3 

Vaccinations 20 

Visits at City Home 129 

Attended at Police station 23 

Examinations : — 

For legal department ....(. 18 

For highway department 8 

For police department ...... 9 

For fire department 3 

For water department 3 

For soldiers' relief department 8 

For building department ...... 1 

For pension 14 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank E. Bateman, 
I i City Physician. 



120 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



January 31, 1923. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Somerville: — 

Gentlemen : — I respectfully submit the annual report of 
the Somerville police department for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31. 1922. 



Arrests. 

Whole number of arrests made .... 2,438 

With and without warrants 1,973 

On summons and notification .... 465 



Males 2,343 

Females . 95 



Americans 1,699 

Foreign Born 839 



Residents 1,625 

Non-residents 913 



1, — Crimes and Offenses Against the Person. 

Assaults 4 

Assault, indecent 1 

Assault on police officer 1 

Assault with dangerous weapon .... 12 

Assault and battery 120 

Assault with intent to murder .... 8 

Assault with intent to rape 3 

Assault with intent to rob 2 

Murder 1 

Rape 5 

Robbery 8 

Threats 10 



2,438 



2.438 



2,438 



2,438 



175 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 



121 



2, — Crimes and Offenses Against Property. 



Arson, attempt . 

Breaking and entering 

Breaking and entering railroad car, attempt 

Breaking glass 

Destroying electric lamps 

Fraudulent conveyance of property 

Illegal possession of registered bottles 

Injury to personal property 

Injury to real estate 

Larceny 

Larceny in building 

Malicious mischief 

Receiving stolen goods 

Trespass . 

Trespass, wilful 

Unlawful diversion of electricity 

Unlawfully using unmetered gas 



1 

40 

1 

4 

8 

2 

1 

2 

11 

104 

1 

3 

5 

51 

15 

1 

1 



251 



3 f ) — Crimes and Offenses Against Public Order, etc. 

Abortion, accessory to 1 

Absent without leave United States Army . . 1 

Accosting female 1 

Adultery 2 

Bail surrender 2 

Bastardy 7 

Capias 7 

Carrying firearms without permit .... 4 

Cruelty to animals 5 

Default 15 

Deserter, United States draft law .... 1 

Disturbing the peace ...... 5 

Disturbing a public assembly 1 

Dog keeping, unlicensed 5 

Drunkenness 1,030 

Drunkenness, common 16 

False statement in procuring marriage license . 1 

Fornication ........ 4 

Fugitive from justice 1 

Gaming implements, present when found . . 30 

Giving false alarms of fire 12 

Idle and disorderly ... . . . . 1 

Lewdness 3 

Lewd cohabitation 7 

Neglected children 3 

Neglect to support . . . . . . 135 

Neglect to support illegitimate children . . 3 

Obstruction on railroad track 2 

Polygamy 1 

Rescue prisoner, attempt ...... 1 

Revoke of parole 2 

Runaway children . . . . . . . 2 

Safe keeping, alcoholism . . . . ... . 1 



122 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Safe keeping, contempt of court . 

Safe keeping, demented .... 

Safe keeping, epileptic ... 

Safe keeping, escape from Lyman School 

Safe keeping, escaped prisoners . 

Safe keeping, escape from Training School 

Safe keeping, infirm . . . 

Safe keeping, insane .... 

Safe keeping, revoke of parole 

Safe keeping, runaway children . 

Safe keeping, runaway from Wrentham School 

Safe keeping, straggler United States Army 

Safe keeping, suicide threatened . 

Safe keeping, violation of immigration law 

Safe keeping, violation of parole 

Stubbornness .... 

Suspicious persons . 

Unlawfully riding on freight car 

Unnatural act .... 

Vagrancy 

Violation health regulation 
Violation of cigarette law 
Violation of city ordinances . 
Violation of food laws 
Violation of labor laws . 
Violation of liquor laws . 
Violation of Lord's Day . 
Violation of milk laws 
Violation of motor vehicle laws 
Violation of parole . 
Violation of terms of probation 
Violation of school laws . 
Witnesses, assault intent to murder 



1 

24 

1 

2 

2 

6 

2 

8 

2 

4 

1 

1 

1 

2 

3 

7 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

105 

2 

3 

95 

22 

10 

317 

3 

53 

11 

3 



Recapitulation. 

(1) Crimes and Offenses Against the Person 

(2) Crimes and Offenses Against Property . 

(3) Crimes and Offenses Against Public Order, 

etc. 

Total number of arrests made . 

Bailed to appear elsewhere 

Cases in which nolle prosequi was entered . 

Cases pending 

Released by probation officer, drunkenness, etc. 

Released from custody 

Surrendered to court, violation probation, etc. 
Surrendered to other officers, institutions, etc. . 
Witnesses, assault intent to murder 



2,012 



175 
251 

2,012 



19 
47 

2 
30 

3 

53 

163 

3 



2,438 



320 



Number of cases held for trial 



2,118 



NOTE. — Two hundred and seventy-two of the above number of 
cases were juveniles and delinquents. 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 



123 



Miscellaneous Reports. 

Abandoned automobiles and trucks found 

Accidents reported 

Accosting females .... 

Amount of property stolen 

Amount of stolen property recovered 

Amount of property damaged 

Amount of property lost 

Amount of property found . 

Absentees from United States Army 

Assaults 

Assaults with dangerous weapons 

Assault with intent to murder . 

Assaults with intent and attempts to rob 

Assault and battery 

Attempts to break and enter 

Attempts to commit larceny 

Attempts to commit suicide . 

Breaking and entering, false alarms of 

Building dangerous from snow and ice 

Buildings broken and entered, nothing stolen 

Buildings found open . 

Buildings flooded .... 

Coal gas poisoning 

Dead animals found 

Dead bodies found .... 

Defective bill boards . 

Defective bridges .... 

Defective buildings 

Defective catch basins . 

Defective chimney 

Defective coal hole 

Defective curb stones . 

Defective drinking fountains 

Defective driveway 

Defective electric lamps 

Defective fences .... 

Defective fire alarm box and gong 

Defective gas gate boxes 

Defective hydrants 

Defective man-holes and covers . 

Defective poles .... 

Defective police signal service 

Defective railway .... 

Defective sewer .... 

Defective sidewalks 

Defective sidewalks, lighted 

Defective signs and sign posts 

Defective sign, lighted . 

Defective streets .... 

Defective streets, lighted 

Defective tree guard 

Defective United States mail boxes 

Defective water gates . 

Defective wires .... 

Demented persons 

Destitute family and person 



32 

786 

3 

$78,828 39 

81,555 53 

153 00 

2,418 10 

246 20 

2 

10 
6 
1 
8 

10 

48 
2 

10 
4 
1 

32 

383 

1 

3 

14 
2 
2 

22 
2 

34 
1 
1 
6 
9 
1 

24 
6 
2 
3 
2 

10 

5 

8 

2 

1 

627 

5 

125 

1 

271 

4 

1 

3 

141 

76 
2 
2 



124 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Disorderly house . 


. . < 






1 


Disturbances 






38 


Disturbances suppressed *. ■ . 






4 


Dogs killed 






25 


Dogs, vicious 






5 


Explosives found . 






1 


Feeble minded person . 






1 


Fires, alarms given for . 






7 


Fire, danger of ... 






1 


Fire extinguished without alarm 






1 


Fire, false alarms of . . 






27 


Fires, needless alarm for . 






2 


Fires reported .... 






251 


Fraud 






2 


Gas leaks . .... 






6 


Gas Poisoning 






1 


Heat prostration .... 






1 


Horse killed . . 






1 


Houses unoccupied 






45 


Indecent exposure of person . 






6 


Larcenies, no value given 






120 


Larcenies 






494 


Lodgers . 


. . < 






4 


Lost children . 


» . . 






282 


Lost children, found 


. . 






282 


Malicious mischief 


> . . 






32 


Missing persons 


> . . 






79 


Missing persons, found 


> . . 






35 


Murder 


. . < 






1 


Obstructions on railroad tracks . 






2 


Obstructions on sidewalks 






8 


Obstruction on sidewalk, lighted . 






1 


Obstructions in streets . 






13 


Obstructions in streets, lighted . 






9 


Obstructions in streets, not lighted . 






6 


Panes of glass broken . 






207 


Permits issued to carry firearms . 






252 


Permits to labor on Lord's Day . 






167 


Persons bitten by dogs 






25 


Persons helped home . 






2 


Persons rescued .... 






2 


Property damaged and destroyed . 






91 


Property lost, no value given 






55 


Property found, no value given . 






76 


Robberies . . . . . 






19 


Runaway children .... 






19 


Runaway children, found 






19 


Runaway horses 






2 


Runaway horses stopped 






5 


Runaway teams 






4 


Sidewalks dangerous from snow and : 


ce 




55 


Sidewalks flooded .... 






8 


Stray bullets fired 






2 


Stray dogs . . . 






131 


Stray dogs found .... 






53 


Stray horses and other animals . 






13 


Stray horses and other 


animals, foun 


d 




5 



CHIEF OF POUCB 



125 



Stray teams 


5 


Stray teams, found 


11 


Streets dangerous from snow and ice . 


43 


Streets flooded 


9 


Street lights reported 


2789 


Strike 


1 


Subways flooded 


5 


Sudden death 


1 


Suicides 


4 


Summonses served for witnesses and defendants 


l 


to appear in court at other places 


615 


Suspicious persons 


68 


Threats . 


5 


Trees dangerous 


58 


Trespass 


50 


Trespass, wilful 


8 


Unlawful appropriation of team . 


1 


Violation, board of health regulations . 


4 


Violation of city ordinances 


233 


Violation of Lord's Day .... 


2 


Violation of motor vehicle laws . 


10 


Violation of traffic regulation . 


1 


Water pipes leaking 


146 


Windows broken 


73 



126 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



OFFICIAL ROSTER OF DEPARTMENT. 
Chief of Police. 

Charles A. Kendall 

Captain. 

Eugene A. Carter. 



James M. Harmon 
Thomas Damery 

Frank H. Graves 
James M. Lynch 
Ernest Howard 



Lieutenants. 



Inspectors. 



Sergeants. 



John A. Ray 
Michael T. Kennedy 

William G. Kenney 
Robert T. Blair 
Thomas P. Walsh 



Patrolmen. 



1 — Edward M. Carter 

2 — Francis A. Perkins 

3 — Theodore E. Heron 

4 — Daniel G. Simons 

5 — Samuel Burns 

6 — John A. Dadmun 

7 — George L. Rice 

8 — Myron S. Gott 

9 — Charles W. Reick 

10 — Frank C. Hopkins 

11 — Hudson M. Howe 

12 — Sanford S. Lewis 

13 — Henry A. Sudbey 

14 — Thomas F. McNamara 

15 — Louis F. Arnold 

16 — Charles S. Johnston 

17 — Claude L. Crossman 

18 — John J. Cummings 

19 — Edmund J. Keane 

20 — Denis Downey 

21 — Edward M. Davies 

22 — George A. C. Peters 

23 — Louis J. Belzarini 

24 — Walter Reed 

25 — Dennis G. Mulqueeney 

26 — Patrick J. Doolin 

27 — Edward J. Hopkins 

28 — Walter L. Groves 

29 — Frederick G. Jones 

30 — Joseph A. Dwyer 

31 — Augustine J. Fitzpatrick 

32 — Patrick McGrath 

33 — Bernard McCabe 

34 — Harry C. Young 

35 — Robert D. Dewar 

36 — Peter Moore 

37 — Albert C. Hawes 

38 — Walter C. Oesting 

39 — John L. Cameron 

40 — Francis P. Higgins 



41 — John J. McCahey 

42 — Alexander Morrison 

43 — Daniel J. Powers 

44 — Jeremiah O'Connor 

45 — Charles E. Wilson 

46 — Timothy Buckley 

47 — John J. Killourhy 

48 — Charles J. Sharry 

49 — Thomas M. Sharry 

50 — Michael J. O'Loughlin 

51 — Charles W. Shepherd 

52 — John F. Cruise 

53 — John J. Shay 

54 — Edward G. Butman 

55 — John P. L. O'Keefe 

56 — Alfred E. Robitaille 

57 — Allan S. Burns 

58 — William H. Donovan 

59 — George R. Allan 

60 — Jeremiah Keniry 

61 — James Murray 

62 — Charles J. Fulton 

63 — Edward F. Culliton 

64 — Alfred J. McFadden 

65 — James A. Fitzpatrick 

66 — Elmer E. G. Raymond 

67 — Frank J. Roche 

68 — Augustine F. Sharry 

69 — Daniel M. O'Connell 

70 — Chester C. F. Warner 

71 — George D. MacDonald 

72 — Charles F. Lacey 

73 — William E. Dwyer 

74 — Charles H. McAvoy 

75 — James F. Holmes 

76 — Earle W. Elliott 

77 — Michael J. Dowd, Jr. 

78 — Patrick J. Lyons 

79 — 'Alfred S. Macomber 
80 — Thomas A. Donovan 



CHIEF OF POMCB 127 



Patrolmen. 

81 — Thomas J. Flanagan 84 — Leo J. Hurley 

82 — Timothy J. Corkery 85 — Henry W. Roche 

83 — John H. O'Leary 86 — John H. Baker 

Reservemen. 

87 — John J. Courtney 88 — Pierce P. Ronayne 

Chauffeurs and Patrol Drivers. 

James W. Lundergan James H. White 

John H. McKenzie 



Matron. 

Mrs. Mina T. Weeks. 

Assistant Matron. 

Mrs. Katherine Woods. 

Pensioners Retired on Half Pay. 

John E. Puller, Mar. 23, 1906 Jacob W. Skinner, Dec. 31, 1917 

Ira S. Carleton, May 9, 1907 Elmer E. Drew, July 25, 1918 

James J. Pollard, Feb. 27, 1908 Ernest S. Goff, July 11, 1919 

Herbert Hilton, Dec. 21, 1911 Charles W. Allen, Mar. 26, 1920 

Ezra A. Dodge, Mar.- 14, 1914 Jotham Chisholm, Apr. 23, 1920 

George H. Carleton, Mar. 27, 1914 Charles E. Woodman, 

Frederick H. Googins June 24, 1921 

Mar. 12, 1915 

CHANGES IN THE FORCE. 

Appointments. 

John J. Courtney, Appointed reserveman, April 15, 1922. 
Pierce P. Ronayne, Appointed reserveman, April 15, 1922. 

Promotions. 

Reserveman, Thomas A. 

Donovan, promoted to patrolman, Sept. 30, 1922 
Reserveman, Thomas J. 

Flanagan. promoted to patrolman, Sept. 30, 1922 
Reserveman, Timothy J. 

Corkery, promoted to patrolman, Sept. 30, 1922 

Reserveman, John H. O'Leary, promoted to patrolman, Sept. 30, 1922 

Reserveman, Leo J. Hurley, promoted to patrolman, Sept. 30, 1922 

Reserveman, Henry W. Roche, promoted to patrolman, Sept. 30, 1922 

Reserveman, John H. Baker, promoted to patrolman, Sept. 30, 1922 

Police Signal Service. 

Number of on duty calls made by the patrolmen . . 279,485 

Telephone calls made by the officers and patrolmen . . 42,733 



128 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



"White" Combination Automobile Service. 

Number of runs made in conveying prisoners to station 

Number of prisoners conveyed 

Number of sick and injured conveyed 

Number of miles run in conveying prisoners 

to station 383.7 

Number of miles run in conveying sick and 

injured 1,610.5 

Number of miles run in conveying prisoners 

to and from jail . . . . . . 106.2 

Number of miles run elsewhere . . . 666.9 



202 
236 
504 



Total number of miles during the year 



2,767.3 



"Reo" Combination Automobile Service. 

Number of runs made in conveying prisoners 

to station 881 

Number of prisoners conveyed 

Number of sick and injured conveyed .... 
Number of miles run in conveying prisoners 

to station 1,682.5 

Number of miles run in conveying sick and 

injured . 656.5 

Number of miles run in conveying prisoners 

to and from jail 462.6 

Number of miles run elsewhere . . . 1,146.4 

Total number of miles during the year .... 

Touring Car Reports. 

Number of prisoners conveyed to station .... 
Number of sick and injured and conveyed .... 
Number of persons conveyed to and from jail 

International Harvester Co. Auto Car Reports. 

Number of prisoners conveyed to station .... 

Number of sick and injured conveyed 

Number of miscellaneous runs 



1,032 
202 



3,948.0 



91 

10 

3 



Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Reports. 
Total mileage for the year 4,642 

Transfers and sales of Motor Vehicles. 

Report on investigation, card indexing and filing sales and 
transfers of motor vehicles. 
Number of licenses granted by License Commission and Board of 

Aldermen. 

First class 5 

Second class 28 

Third class 4 

Total . 37 



CHIEF OF POLICE, 129 

Number of sales and transfers made by dealers .... 4,039 

Number of individual sales 1,701 

Number of stolen motor vehicles reported by the several Police 
Departments, Insurance Agencies and Detective Bureaus in 

the United States and Canada 10,947 

Number of motor vehicles recovered by above .... 3,920 
Number of index cards filed 34,345 



i * 



Respectfully submitted, 

Daniel G. Simons, Police Officer. 

REPORT OF LIQUOR OFFICERS. 

The following is the report of liquor officers from Jan. 31,, 
to Dec. 31, 1922. 

Cases investigated . . . 358 

Search warrants served 98 

Cases in district court 78 

Trials of liquors to be disposed of 41 

Fines imposed in district court $5,025.00 

Gallons of spirituous liquors 523 

Gallons of mash 1,830 

Stills 25 

Hydrometers 6 

Kegs, cans, bottles, jugs, funnels, glasses etc. . . . 697 

Bottles of liquor coloring 5 

Respectfully submitted, 

James M. Lynch, Sergeant. 



REPORT OF POLICE MATRON. 

December 31, 1922. 
To Charles A. Kendall, Chief of Police. 

Dear Sir : — 

I herewith submit my report as matron for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1922. The following females and minors 
were committed to my care, charged with the following offenses 
etc. 

Adultery 1 

Assault and battery 12 

Children, lost 61 

Children, neglected 2 

Default warrant 1 

Disturbing the peace 1 

Drunkenness 17 

Drunkenness, common 1 



130 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Fornication 2 

Illegal sale of intoxicating liquors 18 

Larceny ....." 8 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 3 

Lewdness 1 

Motor vehicles, no certificate of registration ... 1 

Motor vehicle, no license 1 

Motor vehicle, going away without making self known after 

causing injury 1 

Parents, failure to support 9 

Runaway girl 1 

Safe keeping 9 

Stubbornness 1 

Violation of probation 4 

Wanton injury to personal property 1 



Total 156 

I have reported at station each day and have attended 
the sessions of the juvenile court, looking after minors who 
have been in court. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. Mina T. Weeks, Matron. 



Conclusion. 

To His Honor the Mayor, John M. Webster and members 
of the Board of Aldermen, Heads of Departments, Court offi- 
cials, and members of the Police Department, all who have 
assisted me in the discharge of my duties I wish to express 
my sincere thanks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles A. Kendall, 

Chief of Police. 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 



131 



REPORT OF THE STREET COMMISSIONER. 



Office of the Street Commissioner, 
City Hall, Sonierville, January 1, 1923. 
To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

Gentlemen : — I most respectfully submit the forty- 
seventh annual report, containing a brief summary of the 
principal work performed by the Highway Department, by 
day labor and contract, during the year 1922 with recom- 
mendations for necessary additions the coming year. 

This department has charge of the construction, altera- 
tion, repair, maintenance and management of ways, streets, 
sidewalks and bridges ; the setting out and care of shade trees ; 
the suppression of gypsy and brown tail moths, elm leaf 
beetles and other pests which destroy trees; and the oiling 
and watering of streets. 

Highway Department Appropriations. 



Highway Maintenance 
Departmental transfers 

Total credit — Highway Mainte. 
Sidewalks Maintenance 
Street Sprinkling 
Street Cleaning 
Suppression of Moths 
Care of Trees . 
New Streets 
Permanent Pavement 
Sidewalks Construction 
Reconstruction and Resurfacing 



Lppropria- 
tions 


Expenditures 


$68,220 00 




26,029 55 




94,249 55 


$94,058 95 


8,750 00 


8,704 23 


37,525 00 


34,620 85 


25,580 00 


25,479 35 


4,200 00 


4,188 54 


5,500 00 


5,312 01 


20,000 60 


15,726 51 


71,104 41 


69,100 60 


16,025 72 


15,379 35 


30,176 50 


30,156 12 



$313,111 78 $302,726 51 



The yearly maintenance of the Highway department is 
taken from the Highway Maintenance account. Credit is re- 
ceived for work performed for the other divisions of this 
department and other departments of the City. 

No one will dispute the fact that the progress of any 
city is influenced by the building of good streets. The type 
of road to be constructed today is far different from that of a 
few years ago before the introduction of the automobiles. 
The type of roads has been changed from the old water bound 



132 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



macadam to a bituminous material. Then came one of our 
greatest problems in road construction and maintenance; 
the introduction of the motor trucks, some carrying an 
enormous load. I am in favor of the remark which Governor 
Cox made at his inaugural wherein he advocated a large 
revenue could be received for the maintenance of highways, 
and as I understand the cities and towns would receive some 
of this amount, when he said that ail automobile and truck 
owners should pay a tax of two cents a gallon on gasolene. 

It is my intention, the coming year, to erect a shed near 
our storage tank for mixing cold patch material and use the 
tank for the storage and heating of the cold patch liquid when 
it is not being used for the tar used as a cold application on 
the streets. 



1922. 
Highway Maintenance. 



Total Appropriation 
Credits 



Street Commissioner 
Bookkeeper and clerk 
Office expenses and telephones 
Equipment and repairs . 
Harnesses .... 
Tools and machinery- 
Steam rollers 
Automobile maintenance . 
Stable expenses . 
Hay, grain and feed . 
Shoeing .... 
Veterinary .... 

Fuel 

City of Waltham — Taxes 

Miscellaneous 

Holland street ledge . 

Repairs streets, gutters etc. 

Repairs bridges 

Care — subways 

Care — lanterns 

Care — Parkways 

Snow and ice 

Signs 

Care of Highway property 

Emergency 

Block parties 

Sawing wood 

Holidays $3,146.70 — Vacations 

Charges to other departments 

Bills Receivable 



$3,569.60 







$68,220 


00 






26,029 


55 




94,249 


55 


$3,100 


00 






2,769 


00 






482 


19 






3,359 


03 






1,475 


40 






2,419 


63 






313 


60 






3,675 


58 






6,065 


95 






7,198 


79 






1,716 


87 






126 


92 




- 


642 


81 






587 


93 






31 


85 






433 


76 






13,241 


00 






4,998 


48 






424 


46 






3,126 


40 






8 


35 






7,844 


68 






916 


51 






1,235 


85 






181 


72 






62 


90 






194 


53 






6,716 


30 






13,072 


12 






7,636 


34 


$94,058 


95 



Balance 



190 60 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 133 

Snow and lee. 

Since the increased use of automobiles and trucks during 
the winter, and on account of the owners expecting the 
streets to be passable at all times, it has been necessary to 
change considerably the method of caring for the same. Years 
ago the snow was plowed from the gutters and sides of the 
streets into the middle, now it must be plowed from the 
center of the streets to the sides. Another reason the streets 
must be plowed is the motorizing of the fire departments in 
most cities and towns. 

This year a Fordson tractor was purchased with a Stark- 
weather plow attached. The use of this equipment has proven 
satisfactory. 

I receive many complaints about water standing on the 
sidewalks when it rains and when there is a thaw. After in- 
vestigating I find that in more than fifty per cent of the 
cases, the complainants were at fault in not shovelling the 
snow from the sidewalks to the outer edge of the edgestone. 
If this was done it would save the complaint and also the 
city a large amount of money. 

This department removes the snow and ice from side- 
walks, and sands when necessary, in front of all public build- 
ings, grounds and schools. 

97 requests and reports were attended to. 

|7,844.68 was expended for the care of snow and ice. 2503 
cubic yards of snow and ice were removed. 59 cubic yards of 
sand and 293 cubic yards of ashes were used in caring for icy 
sidewalks, streets and crossings. 

Bridges. 

Both bridges on Lowell street over the Boston and Maine 
Railroad which the City has to maintain have* been placed 
in first class condition at an expense of $4,924.88. The Boston 
and Maine Railroad have repaired the Walnut street and the 
School street bridges and a great improvement was made on 
the approaches to the bridge on Washington street over the 
Fitchburg division. These approaches have been in need of 
repair for a number of years. The new construction is ap- 
preciated by the city and the general public. 

The fences on the bridges and approaches where the 
grade crossings were eliminated on Somerville avenue, Med- 
ford street and Webster avenue must be scraped and painted 
the coming year. The other bridges are in good condition. 

Street Railways. 

The Boston Elevated Railway Co. constructed new double 
tracks on a concrete base on Somerville avenue from Beacon 



134 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

street to Wilson square. Replaced new construction for old 
on Somerville avenue from Beacon street westerly to Cam- 
bridge line; on Cross street from Pearl street to Broadway; 
Broadway from Cross street to Hathorn street and Broadway 
from Magoun square to near Willow bridge. 

Underground Wires. 

Underground conduits were constructed by the New 
England Telephone and Telegraph Company on Walnut street 
from Highland avenue to Bow street and on Broadway from 
Hinckley street to City Road. By the Edison Electric Illu- 
minating Company on Willow avenue from Lexington avenue 
to Highland avenue and on Cross street from Pearl street 
to Broadway. The Boston Elevated Railway Company con- 
structed conduits for their feed wires on Cross street from 
Pearl street to Broadway. 

Crushed Stone. 

The William J. McCarthy Co. furnished 37 tons of local 
crushed rock at $1.40 per ton at their crusher and 5,319 tons 
at |1.80 per ton on the line of work. Coleman Brothers fur- 
nished 108 tons trap rock at $2.00 per ton and 48 tons trap 
rock at $2.48 per ton on the line of work. The General 
Crushed Stone Co. furnished 3 tons trap rock at $1.35 per 
ton at their crusher and 1,370 tons trap rock at $1.95 per ton 
on the line of work. 

Steam Rollers. 

No. 1 roller worked 109 ^ days. 
No. 4 roller worked 70 days. 

The old Xo. 2 roller should be exchanged for a new fif- 
teen ton maintenance roller. 

Sidewalks Maintenance. 
I hope the coming year, where there are old brick side- 
walks in our squares, that the same will be removed and 
granolithic substituted, the city paying one half the cost of 
this construction. Most of our squares are paved with some 
kind of permanent paving for the roadways and the side- 
walks should be constructed of granolithic to correspond with 
that of the squares. 

1461 linear feet of edgestone were reset. 8310 square 
yards of brick sidewalks were relaid. 2030 square yards 
of paved gutters were repaved and 12.10 square yards of 
granolithic were relaid. 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 135 

All police reports pertaining to this kind of work are 
charged to this appropriation. 

18,704.23 was expended for Sidewalks Maintenance. 

Street Sprinkling. 

Where there are car tracks on our main thoroughfares the 
American Car Sprinkler flushes and sprinkles the streets for 
1925.00 a month, 8 hours a day, 7 days a week. T hereby 
recommend to His Honor, Mayor Webster, that a contract 
be made with the American Car Sprinkler Co. so that the car 
sprinkler will work twelve hours a day so the squares will be 
flushed every morning before 7 A. M. Most of our side streets 
are constructed with some kind of bituminous material, these 
streets are covered with a cold tar application, applied by 
the city. We are constructing some of our main thorough- 
fares, where there are no car tracks, with permanent paving, 
these streets have to be sprinkled with a horse drawn appara- 
tus. As this paving has increased during the last few years, 
I recommend that an automobile street sprinkler be pur- 
chased to care for the same. 

By the use of tar on our streets two objects are ac- 
complished, namely : — the laying of dust and the sealing or 
coating of our streets. 

Dust layers used during the year : — 

3,190 gallons of Tarvia "B" (Barrett's). 
117,005 gallons of Tarco (Flemmings) 

7,935 gallons of Non-Asphaltic. (Bay State) 
635 gallons of Non-Asphaltic. (Cambridge Gas Light Co.) 

This division of the department is self supporting. 

134,620.15 was expended for Street Sprinkling. 

Street Cleaning. 

There is no branch of the department that shows so much 
for the money expended, as that which keeps the streets clean 
and in a neat condition. I find in many cases where tenants 
and store keepers complain about the dirty condition of the 
streets that they, themselves, are the cause of the complaints 
because they throw or sweep the rubbish into the streets. I 
quote the words of Commissioner Fetherston of New York 
who says : — "This division of my department has a contract 
with the people of the city to perform certain work within 
the limits of the force and appropriation granted for street 
cleaning purposes; the people of the city are parties to this 
contract, and it is their duty to carry out their portion of 



136 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

the agreement, which means that they should understand and 
live up to the laws and ordinances which set forth their obli- 
gations. By comparison it is apparent that the people of the 
city are more negligent than the department of their respec- 
tive duties." 

6,072 cubic yards of street sweepings were removed. 
125,479.35 was expended for Street Cleaning. 

Suppression of Moths. 

Under this appropriation the city cares for all trees both 
public and private, in regard to moths with no special as- 
sessment. Street trees are sprayed in the spring and sum- 
mer. 

This division gives work to quite a number of men in 
the winter, because most of the moths are gathered at this 
time of the vear while thev are in the tent form. 



6,990 street trees were inspected and cared for. 
14,983 private trees were inspected and cared for. 
24,499 bushes were found moth infested. 
11,083 fences and buildings on which moths nested. 
32,628 gypsy moth nests were painted with creosote. 

31 brown tail moth nests were gathered and destroyed. 
2,861 satin moth nests were painted with creosote. 
6,765 trees were sprayed by the gasoline spraying machine to 
exterminate the different kinds of caterpillars and 
beetles. 

14,188.54 was expended for the Suppression of Moths. 



Shade Trees. 

Mayor Webster and the City Government gave a good 
appropriation for this division of the highways, and I have 
had a busy year caring for the trees that were hit by the 
storm of November, 1921. The trees in our city are handi- 
capped to a great extent. Nourishment is curtailed and water 
withheld from their roots by the granolithic sidewalks, con- 
crete gutters and streets constructed with permanent pav- 
ing. Shade trees, where possible, should be planted on pri- 
vate property adjoining the back of the sidewalk. 

36 trees were set out. 
203 trees were removed. 
989 trees were trimmed. 

38 tree guards and supports installed. 

$5,312.01 was expended for Care of Trees. 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 137 

Highway Construction — New Streets. 

Five new streets were constructed during the year under 

the Betterment Act, by contract with William J. Sullivan, 

viz: 

Setting edgestones 55c per linear foot. 

Gutter construction $3.00 per square yard. 

Construction of Macadam roadway $1.55 per square yard. 

The city furnished the edgestone and tarvia binder. 
Straight edgestone $1.00 per linear foot. Circles $1.35 per 
linear foot from H. H. Fletcher Company, delivered on line 
of work. 

Tarco X binder 13 V 2 c per gallon from Trimount Oil Com- 
pany, delivered and sprayed on work. 

Tarvia X from the Barrett Mfg. Company at their factory 
at 9J^c. City teaming and spraying on the work. 

Nine new streets were accepted this year. 
>,726.51 was expended for New Streets. 



138 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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STREET COMMISSIONER. 139 

Sidewalks Construction. 

The city employees constructed all the granolithic side- 
walks this year at an average cost of |3.00 per square yard. 
This price includes excavating and all materials furnished. 

I recommend that the incomplete portions of the side- 
walks on our main streets be constructed with granolithic. 

Miles of edgestone, granolithic, brick and gravel side- 
walks in the city : — 

Edgestones 147.894 miles 

Granolithic sidewalks 55.330 miles 

Brick sidewalks 70.911 miles 

Gravel sidewalks 22.601 miles 

$15,379.35 was expended for Sidewalks Construction. 

Highways Construction — Permanent Pavement. 

Contracts were awarded to Simpson Brothers Corpora- 
tion at |5.90 a square yard and to C. W. Dolloff and Com- 
pany at $6.30 a square yard for paving with granite paving 
blocks grouted with cement on a concrete base. They fur- 
nished all materials and did the excavating. 

A big improvement was made on Cross street from Pearl 
street to Broadway. All wires were placed underground ; 
Electric and sign posts were set on the back of the side- 
walks ; the edgestones on both sides of the street were set 
back eighteen inches, making the roadway three feet wider 
than the old street; new tracks were constructed, in place 
of the old ones, on a concrete base by the Boston Elevated 
Railway Company and granite paving blocks on a concrete 
base grouted were laid from the car tracks to the edgestones 
by the city. If the State does not take this street for a 
boulevard I hope the remaining portion of Cross street will 
be widened and constructed in the same manner. 

1,100.81 was expended for Permanent Pavement. 



Reconstruction and Resurfacing. 

Twelve streets were reconstructed or resurfaced under 
this appropriation at an average cost of $1.50 a square yard 
by city employees. 

By carrying on this kind of work each year the cost of 
maintenance is reduced and keeps our streets up to the 
standard of streets in other cities. I think this kind of con- 
struction for the money expended gives greater satisfaction 
and pleases more tax payers than any other division of this 
department. 

$30,156.12 was expended for Reconstruction and Resur- 
facing. 



140 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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142 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Miscellaneous. 

137 Granolithic driveways constructed 
100 Brick driveways constructed. 
42 Edgestones dropped for driveways. 
2 Driveways extended. 
1 Driveway discontinued. 

Driveways are constructed, discontinued, relocated or ex- 
tended at the expense of the petitioners. 

Length of public streets, 85.762 miles. 

Seven horses were killed on account of disability and no 
horses purchased during the year. 

The department maintains its own municipal repair shop 
for the different lines of work. 

741 horses were shod during the year. Our horses, during 
the slippery going in the winter, must be sharp shod (we use 
the iron grip shoe and drive calks) because we must have 
the sidewalks and hills sanded for others to travel on. 

100 drive calk shoes were put on. 

I have attended meetings of the Public Works and of the 
Board of Aldermen for consultation regarding work and pe- 
titions. 

Labor. 

Eight hours constitute a day. 

The regular employees are given two weeks vacation and 
all employees twelve months Saturday half holiday without 
loss of pay. 

Laborers receive $4.00, drivers and chauffeurs $4.10, me- 
chanics $4.50 and engineers $4.75 per day. 

The city does its own insuring for injured laborers. There 
are twenty-one former employees receiving pensions under the 
act providing for the pensioning of laborers. 

There were during 1922 : — 

154 permits issued to the Cambridge and Charlestown Gas 

Companies. 
170 permits issued to cross sidewalks. 
378 permits issued to occupy streets and sidewalks. 
30 permits issued to feed horses. 
3 street sprinkling complaints and requests. 
254 notifications to other departments and corporations. 
95 accident reports. 
1096 police reports. 
624 brick and granolithic sidewalks repaired. 
1103 miscellaneous reports and requests. 
128 drain layers permits. 
690 water department openings. 
141 permits to open streets and sidewalks. 
46 danger and traffic signs erected. 
15 new signs erected. 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 143 

95 signs repainted. 

62 streets cleaned by request. 
3886 cubic yards of sand and gravel used. 
3571 cubic yards of dirt removed. 
1354 cubic yards of ashes used. 
1773 cubic yards of old macadam used. 
4395 bags of Portland cement used. 

Recommendations. 

I most respectfully recommend that the granite paving 
blocks on a gravel base on Somerville avenue from near 
Union square westerly, and on the northerly side of Wash- 
ington street from the Boston line to Tufts street be removed, 
recut and repaved on a concrete base and grouted with Port- 
land cement. If this is done I think we could secure enough 
extra paving blocks to complete the northerly side of Beacon 
street, which is permanent paving on both ends. Within a 
short time permanent paving will be necessary on the north- 
erly side of Broadway from Cross street to the Boston line, 
as this part of the street is in sad need of a more substantial 
paving than is there at the present time. On Prospect street 
from Somerville avenue to the approaches of the Fitchburg 
railroad bridge the bituminous top should be removed from 
the concrete base and granite paving blocks be laid on the 
old concrete base and grouted with Portland cement. I recom- 
mend the purchase of a one ton Ford truck to be used by 
the tree division, and a fire proof garage to be erected at the 
city stable yard. 

I desire to express my appreciation for the co-operation 
of Mayor Webster, who has taken a great interest in the work 
of this department, also to the members of the Board of 
Aldermen and Heads of Departments- I feel that I would be 
remiss in my duty if I neglected this opportunity to say a 
merited word of praise to the employees of my department 
who perform the actual labor of service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Asa B. Prichard, 

Street Commissioner. 



144 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



Office of the City Engineer, 

City Hall, Somerville, January, 20, 1923. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen: — 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with the city ordinances, the 
following report of the work done and expense incurred for 
the year ending December 31, 1922, by the Engineering De- 
partment and appropriations under my charge and super- 
vision, including the accounts of city engineer, sewers con- 
struction, sewers maintenance, parks maintenance, play- 
grounds maintenance, and other public works, is herewith 
presented: — the 50th anniversary of the city — my twenty- 
seventh annual report as city engineer. 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

In previous reports the general work, charter require- 
ments and city ordinances relating to the duties of the city 
engineer have been fully described — he shall be consulted in 
relation to public improvements of every kind when the ad- 
vice of a civil engineer would be of service — and no pipes, 
conduits, railway tracks, poles or other structures shall be 
placed beneath or upon the city streets unless a plan show- 
ing proposed location thereof has first been approved by 
the city engineer. City Engineer is also Supt. of Sewers and 
Supt. of Parks and grounds. 

New construction work has progressed more during the 
past year, in the various divisions, than any time since the 
World War. 

Divisions Appropriations and Credits Expenditures Balances 

City Enginneer . 
Parks Maintenance 
Playgrounds Maint. 
Sewers Maintenance 
Sewers Construction 
Stock Account 

(A) Includes $300.00 transfer to City Engineer Account. 

(B) Includes 400.00 transfer to City Engineer Account. 

(Expenditures in the various divisions are shown in de- 
tail in the City Auditor's annual report). 



$12,945 00 


$700 


00 


$13,602 06 


$42 94 


11,450 00 






11,383 15 


66 85 


6,510 00 


339 


75 


6,795 47(A) 


54 28 


24,500 00 


419 


40 


24,573 59(B) 


345 81 


17,042 47 






14,286 09 


2,756 38 




422 


65 


199 05 


223 60 



CITY ENGINEER. 145 

CITY ENGINEER DIVISION, CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDI- 
TURES, 1922. 

Sewers and Storm Drains, — comprising surveys, esti- 
mates, profiles, lines, grades, titles, plans, assess- 
ments, all engineering work relating to same and 

supervision $1,470 76 

Highways, — comprising plans, estimates, titles, profiles, 
lines and grades, inspection of paving and all other 
engineering work relating to the department . . 1,392 32 

Sidewalks, — comprising profiles, lines, grades, measure- 
ments, inspection, titles, costs and assessments . . 352 14 
Water Works, — comprising lines, grades, locations of 
mains, gates, hydrants, services and other matters 
relating to the department . . . • . . 497 63 
Parks and Playgrounds, — comprising surveys, plans, esti- 
mates, profiles, and grades, including laying out of 
parks, playrgounds, boulevard and supervision . . 296 62 
Public Buildings, — comprising surveys, estimates, lines 
and grades, and other work relating to constructing 

and laying out of grounds 209 69 

Street Numbering, — comprising locations of buildings, 

plans .assigning street numbers, etc 431 89 

Street Lines and Grades, — comprising establishing of 
lines, grades, and miscellaneous data given parties 

for building and grading 361 69 

Bridges and Grade Crossings, — comprising surveys, plans, 

profiles, estimates, lines and grades, etc. ... 69 35 

City Survey, — comprising establishing of street lines, 
acceptance plans, and miscellaneous survey work for 

city map, etc. 450 00 

Middlesex Registry and Land Court, — comprising copying 
of plans, and abstracts from deeds and examination 
of titles filed at East Cambridge, also tracing of street 
acceptance and sewer taking plans, filed for record 127 33 

Private Corporations, Railway, Telephone, Electric Light 
and Gas Light Companies, — comprising grades, 
plans, profiles and office notes, locations of poles and 

conduits 132 83 

Setting Stone Bounds and Brass Rods, — defining street 

lines and city boundary lines 63 83 

Office Work, — comprising record of all locations, indexing, 
typewriting, bookkeeping, calculations, reports, and 

general draughting 1,597 25 

Miscellaneous Work, — comprising preliminary surveys, 
designs, sketches, etc., relating to various schemes 

for committees 19 42 

Holidays, Vacations and Sickness 882 79 

National Guard Duty 65 00 

Engineering, — General Departmental expenses (all di- 
visions) comprising city engineer's salary, auto, tele- 
phone, car fares, postage and incidentals . . . 5,181 52 

Total $13,602 06 

Value of field instruments, tools and office instruments, 
$1,500.00 



146 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The total cost of maintaining the Engineer's Division 
since it was established. 1872-1922 both vears inclusive, has 
amounted to $438,463.00. 

Six assistants have been employed the greater part of 
the year, on engineering work. 

A number of plans were made during the year for street 
acceptance and five streets have been accepted as public 
highways, under the betterment act. 

There are plans for acceptance of twelve private streets 
on file in this office, that for various reasons have not been 
made public ways. 

Surveys, calculations, estimates and plans have been made 
for taking land, buildings and private property for School- 
house purposes in certain sections of the city and borings and 
tests made by this department to determine the character 
of the soil for the foundation of proposed buildings to be 
erected on the areas taken. 

The improvement of Cross street (between Broadway 
and Pearl street) has been accomplished by widening the 
Toadway and narrowing the sidewalks eighteen inches on 
either side of the street, placing all overhead service wires 
in underground conduits and removing old poles from the 
street, except the trolley wire support poles which were 
relocated on the inside of the sidewalk or property line; 
this plan of improvement should be extended the entire length 
of the street to Central Square immediately. 

Many streets and avenues in the city are of the same, or 
very similar name and could be changed at the present time 
(renamed in memory of deceased veterans of World War) 
eliminating the confusion now existing; and where traffic is 
congested, certain streets should be made "one way" streets 
and traffic regulation and zone signs installed. 

Some of the old main thoroughfares should be re- 
numbered their entire length, so as to eliminate half numbers 
and letters now being used. 



CITY ENGINEER. 147 



A LAST TRIBUTE OF RESPECT AND ESTEEM 
TO THE MEMORY OF 

JOHN JOSEPH MURRAY 

BORN DECEMBER 24, 1877 

DIED NOVEMBER 26, 1922. 

AN ASSISTANT IN THE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

FOR MORE THAN 26 YEARS OF FAITHFUL 

SERVICE 



"Johnny" Murray, as he was popularly known by his 
office associates, all city employees and his many friends, was 
a Somerville boy, educated in the city's public schools and 
employed in this department all his life; — at his work on 
Saturday, but for the last time, as shortly after leaving the 
office for the week-end, he became ill and died on the follow- 
ing day. (Sunday). 

His sudden death deprived the department and city of 
servcie of a high character — his whole career displayed ability 
and he was conscientious, efficient and energetic in the per- 
formance of his duties. 

A young man of a happy, genial and kindly disposition, of 
a courteous and affable bearing with his office companions, a 
general favorite, endearing him in the hearts of many friends, 
and he will be long and pleasantly remembered. 



148 



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CITY ENGINEER. 149 

Summary. — Public streets 85.762 miles (includes 1.406 
miles of City Boulevard and Park Roadways, 2.331 miles of 
State Boulevard (Metropolitan Park Commission), and 1.596 
miles State Highway) ; private streets 15.104 miles. 

Total length of streets in the city 100.866 miles. 

In the 1910 report, tables were published showing old 
names of certain streets as formerly known, and names of 
public squares in the city; the names of some of these squares 
having been changed recently. 



Length of Public Streets in Each Ward 

Ward one 10.824 

Ward two 9.739 

Ward three 7.630 

Ward four 10.026 

Ward five 12.540 

Ward six 13.866 

Ward seven . . . 21.137 



Total length of public streets in the city . . . 85.762 

Street ''Markers" — (Stone Bounds) (Brass rods set in 
cement sidewalks). 

1922 — stone bound set southeast corner Otis Street and 
Wigglesworth Street. 

Stone bound set southeast side Marshall Street at south- 
west corner old Fire Station Lot. 

Stone bounds have been reset in Portland cement con- 
crete at a number of street intersections and angles, to define 
and preserve the true lines of public streets, and this work 
should be continued as much as possible each year. These 
bounds are also of great convenience in establishing per- 
manent "Bench Marks" throughout the city for giving grades. 

In the 1907 report a table was compiled from old reports, 
maps, and office notes, showing the location of stone bounds; 
the year when set, and whether existing or removed from 1860 
to 1907 inclusive, and additional lists in the reports of 1908, 
1910, 1911, 1913, 1919, 1920, 1921 and 1922 will show location 
of all street bounds set to 1923. 

There are at the present time a total of 660 bounds or 
brass rods set for defining street lines. 

Four new streets have been constructed, under the bet- 
terment act, with a bituminous macadam wearing surface, 
concrete gutters and granite edgestone, a total of 1,689 feet 
(.32 mile) ; the work being done by contract. 

The average cost of this type of construction complete, 
for these streets, was $9.27 per linear foot, a high rate, on 



150} 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



account of the unusual cost of materials and labor. (Average 
cost of bituminous surface $1.83 per square yard.) 

Assessments have been levied on abutting property 
owners for approximately one-half of the cost of constructing 
these streets. 

New granite block pavement has been laid on a concrete 
base with a cement grout in sections of Linwood street, Som- 
erville avenue, Beacon street, Cross street and Murray street; 
12,966 square yards (3,640 feet in length) of this type of 
pavement were constructed by contract at $5.90-$6.20-$6.30 
per yard complete. In conjunction with this paving the 
street railway company also laid approximately 2,770 square 
yards new granite paving between rails where tracks existed 
and new tracks added. 

In constructing the granite pavement, new bituminous 
streets and granolithic sidewalks, 4,006 feet (0.76 mile) of 
new granite edgestone were set, at an average cost of $1.55 
per foot. 

The total length of permanent paved streets in the city 
amounts to 18.54 miles. 

Permanent street pavement should be extended as rapidly 
as possible, using old granite blocks, re-cut and laid on a 
concrete base — the best and most economical pavement for 
this city. 

Grades were given and measurements taken for the 
reconstruction of twelve streets with a bituminous wearing 
surface, a length of 7,989 feet (1.513 miles) ; — this work was 
done by day labor, averaging $1.20 per square yard (at the rate 
of $3.10 a foot for 40 foot width street.) 



TABLE OF STREET CONSTRUCTION 



♦Streets paved with granite blocks 
** Streets paved with concrete . 
t Streets paved with asphaltic top 
Streets paved with vitrified brick 
Streets paved with "Bi-co-mac" . 
Streets paved with bitulithic (patent) 
Combination pavement (concrete base 

bituminous top) 

t Streets macadamized (bituminous binder) 
Streets macadamized (water bound) 
Streets graveled or unimproved . 



with 



Total 



Sq. Yards 


Miles 


153,850 


6.83 


23,990 


1.42 


38,964 


2.37 


20,958 


1.29 


10,100 


0.77 


3,059 


0.06 


87,200 


5.80 




43.53 




22.89 




15.91 



100.87 



•Also 32.5 miles (single track) electric railway paved with granite, asphalt, 

bitulithic, etc. 
••Includes 0.42 mile state highway, 
tlncludes 1.16 miles of state highway. 
^Includes 1.406 miles of city boulevard and park roadways and 2.881 miles 

of state boulevard (Metropolitan Park Commission). 



CITY ENGINEER. 



151 



There are a number of very dangerous crossings in this 
city at intersecting public thoroughfares, where the corners 
should be cut back and the roadway widened for the safety of 
traffic and improvement in appearance. 

Lines and grades were given and measurements taken 
for constructing thirty-three new granolithic sidewalks — 
5,215.3 square yards (1.35 miles), and assessments were com- 
puted, the abutting property owners paying one-half the cost. 
The greater part of this work was done by day-labor at an 
average cost of |3.00 per square yard. 

In laying out new work, under orders .passed for con- 
struction of sidewalks, etc., occasionally portions of build- 
ings and fences are found to be encroaching on the sidewalk 
and on some of the old rangeways these encroachments have 
existed for many years; as improvements are made, the full 
width of sidewalk should be maintained. 

In sections of the city where brick sidewalks have been 
laid many years, and must necessarily be relaid on account 
of deterioration and unevenness, granolithic should be sub- 
stuted in place of brick. 



Miles of Edgestone, Granolithic, Gravel and Brick Sidewalks in Each 

Ward. 







Gravel 


Brick 


Granolithic 




Edgestone 


Sidewalk 


Sidewalk 


Sidewalk 


Ward one 


20.042 


3.574 


11.898 


4.994 


Ward two 


16.962 


6.513 


6.386 


3.835 


Ward three 


14.325 


0.906 


11.603 


1.911 


Ward four 


15.309 


1.250 


9.802 


4.189 


Ward five 


22.716 


4.399 


12.155 


6.056 


Ward six 


25.372 


3.949 


10.678 


11.419 


Ward seven 


33.168 


2.010 


8.389 


22.926 



147.894 



22.601 



70.911 



55.330 



(Details, etc., streets and sidewalks in report of Street Com- 
missioner). 



The Boston Elevated Railway Company has petitioned 
for a relocation of tracks in certain streets and has made 
extensive repairs in its roadbed in this city during the past 
year, replacing long sections of old tracks with new and 
heavier rails; and new double tracks have been constructed 
in Somerville avenue between Wilson Square and Beacon 
street bridge — completing a through double track line in 
this street, extending from the west Cambridge line to the 
east Cambridge line, connecting to Lechmere Square ter- 
minal. In Teele Square and Wilson Square double tracks 



152 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

have been relocated and widened out on the curves so that 
large cars can operate without delay. 

There are, however, a number of miles of trackage, orders 
having been granted for widening in the city's main thorough- 
fares, where the old granite block pavement, within the rail- 
road location should be relaid and grouted with cement and 
additional catch basins constructed between the rails to relieve 
the flooding of sections of certain streets in times of heavy 
storms. There are 32.5 miles of electric railroad (single track 
length) at the present time in the city's streets. A consider- 
able length of high power cables have been placed in under- 
ground conduits. 

Plans have been made by the various companies and filed 
in the city engineer's office, showing the locations of gas mains, 
poles, tracks and conduits in this city, which have been 
granted by the board of aldermen during the year; and the 
work of placing overhead wire in conduits, underground, and 
removing poles from the streets should be extended as rapidly 
as possible. 

In the city's squares overhead wires should be placed 
underground, immediately, and practically all poles (except 
for lights) removed — on the main thoroughfares many of 
the existing poles should be eliminated, at the present time, 
being unnecessary. 

A special ordinance should be enacted concerning city 
inspection on all underground work done by private companies 
or corporations and regulation as to method of street open- 
ings. 

At the present time there are underground in the city's 
streets 17.64 miles of telephone conduits, 12.72 miles of elec- 
tric light conduits, 4.46 miles of electric railway conduits, 
and about 9.97 miles of underground conduits used for the 
city's wires. 

The Cambridge and Charlestown gas companies have re- 
spectively 64.42 and 28.16 miles of gas mains in the city's 
streets. 

Lines and grades have been given for laying new city 
water mains. New house services, many gates, hydrants, 
water posts and blow-offs have been located and recorded, 
sketches and plans made showing the same, and the water 
works maps corrected to date; also a large number of old 
water services where new meters were installed, have been 
located and recorded. 

A number of the locations of old hydrants, gates, etc., 
have been found to be incorrect, a few having been removed 
entirely ; a new survey of the entire distribution system should 
be made and the maps and office records compiled. (Length 



CITY ENGINEER, 153 

of water mains, details, etc., in report of Water Commis- 
sioner). 

Lines and grades have been given for the erection of 
city buildings and plans and sketches made for the laying 
out of surrounding grounds: — a special plan being made 
showing a proposed development of the West Somerville Ju- 
nior High School grounds for athletic purposes. 

Plans have been made where accidents have occurred on 
the city work, or where boundaries were in dispute and spe- 
cial plans and data prepared for the city solicitor's use in 
court cases, miscellaneous data compiled relating to the 
sewers, highways, bridges, etc., in this city for various state 
departments; and Federal, State and Municipal hearings at- 
tended where information was required. 

All plans of estates in Somerville recorded at the Kegis- 
try of Deeds, East Cambridge, including land court plans, 
have been copied, also titles examined, abstracts from deeds 
made for the purpose of assessments, and the proportional 
part of the cost of new work computed, and schedules of as- 
sessments made out showing the property owners. 

Probably the proposed plan of widening Bridge street 
(East Cambridge) being the extension of Somerville avenue 
will be accomplished the coming year; after numerous hear- 
ings, the construction and completion of the work and pro- 
portioning of assessments has been placed under the control 
and jurisdiction of the County Commissioners — a much needed 
public improvement for relieving the present congested traf- 
fic and business. 

A skeleton map of the city is on file in this office show- 
ing steam and electric car lines, principal streets, public 
buildings and locations of principal industries : — also spe- 
cial maps showing buildings and areas built upon previous to 
1872 (when a town) and at the present time (a city 50 
years). 

A set of block plans should be made covering the entire 
city area, from accurate surveys made during the past 
twenty-five years, and carefully compared section by section 
with the deed dimensions and areas recorded in the asses- 
sor's department, and in this manner the correct areas of 
land determined. 

This set of plans would show the area and dimensions 
of each lot, all houses and other buildings, sewers, catch ba- 
sins, house drains, water services, gas mains, underground 
conduits for wires, street lights, street railway tracks, etc., 
and be of great value to many city departments. Five of 
these sectional plans have already been made. A separate 
appropriation should be made for completing these plans. 



154 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Total number of plans, on file in the office approximately 
eight thousand four hundred. 

Perambulation of the Somerville-Medford city boundary 
line: — December 13, 1922, a committee appointed from each 
city, including city engineers and street commissioners, ex- 
amined the monuments and reference points defining the divis- 
ion line between these two cities and reported their findings 
in due form to the board of aldermen ; these boundary lines 
are. perambulated every five years as prescribed by the statues. 

No action has been taken by representatives of the city 
governments of Somerville and Medford relative to the chang- 
ing of the boundary line between the two . cities. From the 
various studies presented, an exchange of territory can be 
made that would be equally advantageous. 

In addition to the regular work of the department, con- 
siderable information and assistance has been furnished to 
the various city departments and citizens of the city; and 
special data for the development of real estate etc., given 
to private engineers, architects and builders. 

For the immediate improvement of conditions in this city 
the highway bridges and approaches over the steam railroads 
should be rebuilt the full width of the street at Broadway, 
(North Somerville) Prospect street and Washington street, 
near Union square ; and the steam railroad bridge over Wash- 
ington street (East Somerville) reconstructed with increased 
head-room for street traffic, — the dangerous railroad grade 
crossing at Park street should be abolished, as decreed by 
the courts a number of years ago; and a foot-bridge should 
be constructed over the steam railroad tracks making a con- 
nection between Wilson square — Craigie street on the north- 
erly side and Stanford Terrace-Beacon street on the souther- 
ly side of this railroad. 

I respectfully refer to some of the more important rec- 
ommendations and suggestions made in reports of the city 
engineer for a number of years past ,which are for the im- 
provement of conditions in this city. 



COMPILED TABLE OF AREAS, USEFUL FOR VARIOUS DEPART- 
MENTS, SHOWING A SUB-DIVISION OF CITY'S ACREAGE. 

Land and water, total area city 2700 acres 

Water 100 acres 

Streets 480 

Boulevards — city and State . . 22.6 " 

Squares 8.8 " 

Steam railroads, locations 90 " 

Freight, distribution areas 26 " 

Parks 38 



CITY ENGINEER. 



155 



Athletic fields and playgrounds 

Schoolhouse lots 

Fire station lots 

Miscellaneous city building lots and 

institutions 
(40) Church lots .... 

Large manufacturing and mercan 

tile plants .... 
Tufts College land . 
Large areas vacant and refilled 

marsh land . 



(30) 
(7) 



(20) 



30 
22.7 
2.4 

29.5 
13 

100 
46.5 

115 



1124.5 acres 



Approximate dwelling area built upon (partly covered) 
Approximate number of dwellings in city, 14,140 
Average area to a dwelling about 4,800 square feet. 



1575.5 acres 



' SEWER DIVISION 

The designing and constructing of sewers, storm drains, 
catch basins, house drains, etc., — maintenance of the drain- 
age system and other items in this division are under the 
direction, supervision and control of the city engineer. 

Sewers were petitioned for and constructed during the 
year in a number of newly laid out streets, where real estate 
owners commenced extensive building operations for the first 
time since the World War; approximately 140 new two-fam- 
ily houses were erected the past year on these streets. 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT, STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, 

1922. 

Labor (city dept.) $1,022 05 

Labor (contract) 9,468 91 

Inspection 387 45 

Teaming . . . ■ 396 78 

Materials and Supplies ..... 3,010 90 

Materials from Stock 199 05 

Cost of new construction work . . $14,485 14 



CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES 

Constructing sewers (separate system) . . $10,448 62 

Constructing storm drains .... 2,999 81 

Constructing catch basins .... 889 27 

Constructing manholes on sewers . . . 147 14 

Cost of new work .... 
Materials on hand December 31 



$14,485 14 
223 60 



Total 



$14,708 74 



156 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



CREDIT. 

Appropriations ($10,000) + ($7,000) . . $17,000 00 

Balance unexpended, 1921 .... 42 47 

Materials on hand January 1, 1922 . . . 422 65 



Total ... ... $17,465 12 



Balance unexpended (over to 1923) . $ 2,756 38 

Six sewers were completely constructed and one partial- 
ly built during the year and also storm drains; a length of 
7,012 feet (1 1-3 miles) of 10" and 8" pipe, the greater part 
of the work being done by contract, the remainder by depart- 
ment labor. (See attached tabular statement for 1922, show- 
ing itemized account of work.) 

The total length of the city's drainage system is 114.926 
miles, and the entire cost of construction including catch 
basins has amounted to about $1,376,757.00, exclusive of the 
amount paid to the state for assessments for the construc- 
tion of the North Metropolitan sewerage system. 

The city's assessment for the Metropolitan sewerage sys- 
tem for the past year was $52,388.51 on construction account 
and $42,676.63 for maintenance and operation, and the total 
amount paid the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for this 
state sewer has been $1,708,002.78 (1892-1922, both years in- 
clusive). The total length of the Metropolitan sewerage sys- 
tem mains running through the city amounts to 3.475 miles. 

There are within the city's limits thirteen connections 
with the North Metropolitan state sewerage system, also four 
outlets through the city of Cambridge and three outlets 
through the city of Medford. The locations of the connec- 
tions of the city's mains with the state sewer are shown in 
the 1912 report, and details of construction in previous re- 
ports. 

The 1918 report contains a compiled table of Storm 
Drains constructed to 1919 showing length, cost, date of con- 
struction, district benefited, etc. 

Fifteen catch basins have been constructed in the high- 
ways during the year, making a total of 2,055 basins in the 
city for street drainage purposes, constructed and maintained 
as follows: — 

By the city (sewer division): — 

Located in streets and subways .... 1,863 basins 

Located in city boulevard 33 " 

Located in parks (17) and other city lots (12) 29 " 



Total catck basins constructed and main- 
tained by the city 1,925 











TABULAR STATEMENT OF SEWERS AND STORiM DRAINS BUILT IN 1922. 



























LOCATION 
















ITEMS OP CONSTRUCTION AND COST 


















From 


To 


Contractor 


Material 
Excavated 


3 

u 

i 


SEWER 


SUB- 


DRAIN 


ROCK 

' EXCAVATION 


MANHOLES 


1 
1 

S 

3 
Z 


COST PER 


LINEAR FOOT 




8 
1 


£ 
1 
1 


o 




c 
03 


3 


a 

a 

a 

0Q 


as 

u vi 

3 


! 

>> 

1 


•a 

c 


J) 
E 

3 

z 


§ 

•5 


Excavation 

Pipelayintr 

and Refilling 


S 


ho c 
■C 2 

"5; 

1 S 
H M 


E 

3 


o 

ll 


Name of street 


m 5)P 


s 

3 


o 




Woods Avenue 
Woods Avenue 

Pennsylvania Avenue 
Pennsylvania Avenue 

Alewife Brook Parkway 
Alewife Brook Parkway 

Parkdale Street 
Parkdale Street 

Washington Street 
Washington Street 

East of Hillsdale Road 
East of Hillsdale Road 

Alewife Brook Parkway 
Alewife Brook Parkway 


Sterling Street 
Fairfax Street 

Blakeley Avenue 
Blakeley Avenue 

Near North Street 
Near North Street 

Near Magnus Avenue 
Near Magnus Avenue 

Lewis Street 
Lewis Street 

Near Curtis Street 
Near Curtis Street 

Near North Street 
Near North Street 


Denis I. Crimraings 
Denis I. Crimmings 

Denis I. Crimmings 
Denis I. Crimmings 

Denis I. Crimmings 
Denis I. Crimmings 

Bartholomew Burke 
Bartholomew Burke 

Denis I. Crimmings 
Denis I. Crimmings 

City — Day Labor 
City — Day Labor 

Denis I. Crimmings 
Denis I. Crimmings 


Sand, Marl & Hardpan 
Sand, Marl & Hardpan 

Gravelly Hardpan 
Gravelly Hardpan 

Gravelly Hardpan 
Gravelly Hardpan 

Filling & Sand 
Filling & Sand 

Sand 
Sand 

Gravelly Hardpan 
Gravelly Hardpan 

Gravelly Hardpan 
Gravelly Hardpan 


9'-l" 
8'-2" 

r-4" 

6'-5" 

7'-l» 

G'-2" 

6--0" 

5'-l" 

7'-4" 
6 '-5" 

7'-4" 
G'-5" 

7'-9" 
6'-10" 



8" 
8" 

:: 


596.8 
355.0 

111.7 
111.7 


4" 

... 

.... 
.... 

.... 
.... 

.... 

:: 

<:: 


596.8 
. . 



206.0 


21.5 
7.5 

:::::::: 

5.0 
6.5 


$7.00 
7.00 

7.00 
7.00 


1 

Combi- 
nation 


$111.50 


15 

8 

5 
5 

48 
46 

7 
7 

24 
23 

11 
11 

78 
78 


$3.10 
0.20 


$0.20 


$0.30 
0.29 

0.30 

0.40 

0.30 
0.34 

0.30 

0.33 
0.18 

0.50 
0.47 

0.36 
0.33 


$0.09 
0.15 

0.05 

0.02 

0.04 
0.04 

0.04 
0.01 

0.06 
0.05 

0.04 
0.03 

0.06 
0.05 


$0.84 
0.51 

0.03 



0.09 

0.05 


$5.18 
2.45 

3.50 
0.76 

3.11 
0.68 

0.39 

2.90 
0.71 

2.20 
0.86 

2.16 
0.74 


$3,092 08 
869 41 

391 12 
85 07 

2,590 14 
569 80 

58 17 
100 37 

1,530 45 
393 50 

498 38 
195 05 

2,288 28 
786 61 


$1,102 46 


$1,989 62 




869 41 
138 12 


Alewlfe Brook Parkway Storm Drain.... 


1 


41.63 


1 
2.90 | 


253 00 




2.60 
0.20 

2.15 
0.28 

1.27 








8" f 832.3 
8" 832.3 

8" T 260.0 
8" 260.0 

1 

8" 1 528.5 
10" 552.1 

8" | 226.1 
8" 226.1 

I 
8" | 1059.5 
8" I 1059.5 


3 

Combi- 
nation 


55.80 



2,416 00 


174 14 








1 



50.13 


Materials and 

Labor Furnished 

By Owner 


68 17 








3 
Combi- 
nation 


79.53 


1,500 00 


30 45 




393 50 




2 
Combi- 
nation 


62.48 




498 38 




0.22 








4 
Combi- 
nation 


77.12 



1.48 
0.20 


0.20 


2,288 28 










10" 




1 
1 







7011.6 (1.328 miles) Sewers and Storm Drains 



$7,559 74 $5,888 69 



Total length of public sewers in the city January 1, 1923 
Total length of private sewers in the city January 1, 1923 

Total length of sewers in the city January 1, 1923 . 
Total length of storm drains in the city January 1, 1923 

Total length of the city drainage system January 1, 1923 

Total length of Metropolitan sewerage system mains in 

the city 1 



= 506,214.2 feet 
= 34,748.0 feet 

= 540,692.2 feet = 102.455 miles (32.206 miles sep- 
arate system sewers) 

= 65,849.2 feet = 12,471 miles 

= 114.926 miles 

= 3.475 miles 



CITY ENGINEER. 157 

By Boston & Maine Railroad Company on railroad lo- 
cations 36 basins 

By State, located in boulevards and highways . . 130 " 



166 



Total catch basins in the city for storm 

drainage purposes 2,091 

The "separate system" sewers should be extended in the 
older sections of the city each year, as the appropriation 
will allow, and storm drains completed in certain localities 
as previously recommended : — especially in the North Som- 
erville District, including Morrison Avenue-Highland Road 
area and the B. and M. railroad valley; and at the East 
Cambridge line extending from the Somerville avenue sewer 
and discharging into Miller's River. 

Sidewalk sewers in Mossland street should be constructed 
immediately and a section of the old sewer in Poplar street 
reconstructed, relieving the continuous blocking of house 
drains under existing conditions. 

The city's drainage system will be greatly improved when 
all the foregoing changes are made and construction work 
completed. 

MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT, STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, 

1922. 

Labor $12,222 25 

Inspection 793 93 

Teaming (includes $199.76 Highway 

Dept. etc.) 10,463 95 

Equipment and Supplies .... 412 64 

Repairing property and tools . . . 280 82 



Total Expenditure . . . $24,173 59 



CLASSIFICATION! OF EXPENDITURES. 

Maintenance of sewers, including clean- 
ing, flushing, supervision, etc. (114.9 
miles) $5,008 53 

Maintenance of catch basins, cleaning, 

and flushing, supervision etc. (1925) 14,980 31 

Maintenance of storm water pump, Med- 

ford Street . . • . . . . 157 65 

Changing line and grade and repairing 

catch basins 868 81 

Changing line and grade and repairing 

manholes 382 59 

Repairing old sewers 708 41 

Inspection and location of house drains . 763 10 

New tools and supplies .... 325 21 



158 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Repairs of tools and property . 
Maintenance of sewer division yards 
Telephone (2) 

Labor, teaming and materials for other 
departments 

Cost of work done 
Transfer to City Engineer Ac- 
count 

Total expenditures 



CREDIT. 

Appropriation $24,500 00 

Received from other departments . . 419 40 



78 22 

760 00 

74 89 




65 87 






$24,173 59 




400 00 




$24,573 59 



Total credit $24,919 40 



Balance unexpended . . . $345 81 

Value of tools and property on hand, maintenance of 
sewers, $2,000.00. 

John J. Foley, a faithful laborer for more than a quarter 
of a century in this division, who was retired on a pension 
the latter part of 1921, died August 30, 1922 — the only per- 
son ever receiving a pension in the department. 

A permanent force of men, varying in number from eight 
to thirteen per week, and teams are kept continually at 
work flushing, cleaning and repairing the city's drainage 
system, catch basins, etc., the expense necessarily increasing 
yearly as lengths of sewers, storm drains and catch basins 
are added to the system, and the distance increased to the 
dumping places, which are fast diminishing, only two being 
available at present. 

This question of scarcity of dumping places has con- 
fronted the city for some time and various schemes have been 
considered for efficient and economical methods of disposal 
but no feasible plan has been provided. 

Approximately 4,u00 cubic yards of material have been 
removed from the catch basins and hauled to dumps during 
the year, at an average cost of about |3.00 per cubic yard 
($1.47 removal — $1.53 teaming) and the average cost per 
mile for cleaning and flushing the drainage system, includ- 
ing catch basins, has amounted to about $174.00. There are 
about twenty catch basins (average) to a mile of roadway 
in this city and the approximate cost of cleaning, flushing, 
and general maintenance per basin has been $7.78 the past 
year. 



CITY ENGINEER. 159 

A demonstration of machine cleaned catch basins way 
conducted for a period of five consecutive days — an auto- 
truck cleaning machine (' 'orange peel grab" lift equipment) 
removed material in less time than could be done by day 
labor, but the cost per cubic yard exceeded the hand work — 
the result being speedier cleaning. 

A number of repairs have been made and sections rebuilt 
on some of the old sewers, alterations made in the outlets 
and overflows, and extra manholes built for the purpose of 
improving the system. 

Many catch basins and manholes have been repaired and 
grade or line changed. 

Three hundred and fifty-nine permits have been issued 
to licensed drain layers for connecting buildings with main 
sewers and storm drains ; sixty-eight being for repairs, alter- 
ations or extensions, all of the work being done under the 
supervision of the city's inspector. 

Many of these repairs and alterations were made neces- 
sary by the growth of tree roots in the private drain pipe. 
In several cases, these private drains were relaid with iron 
pipe and lead joints, which is the type of construction recom- 
mended by this department, where drain connections have 
become stopped on account of tree roots. 

Certain persons are licensed as drain layers by the city 
and are under bonds, for the purpose of laying and repairing 
these private drains : — none others are permitted to do this 
work. 

Keference to data concerning each drain connection with 
the public sewer is on file in this office, and time and expense 
could be saved by the owner, by applying directly to this de- 
partment for investigation and advice, where trouble exists. 

Many car track catch basins and underground conduit 
manholes have been connected with the city's drainage sys- 
tem. 

There are to date about 16,892 private house drain con- 
nections with the city's drainage system. 

Extensive repairs have been made to the automatic 
machinery, tanks, copper floats, tide gates, etc., constructed 
and installed more than twenty-five years ago in brick mason- 
ry chambers, where the city's mains are discharging into the 
state sewer. 

A better system of grease traps should be installed in 
the premises of some of the larger manufacturing plants and 
rendering companies to prevent large amounts of grease and 
waste products from escaping into the city sewer mains and 
at various times has partially blocked sections of sewers — 
the past year a number of loads of heavy grease has been 



160 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

scraped and removed from the sewers at a considerable ex> 
pense. 

During the year the sewer division has done consider- 
able miscellaneous work for other city departments and out- 
side companies, furnishing material and labor, and being 
partially reimbursed for the same. 

Some of the old trunk sewers which were constructed 
many years ago are in a dangerous condition; sections where 
the arch is badly cracked and liable to collapse any time, 
should be immediately rebuilt. 



PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS DIVISION 

The care, superintendance and management of the city's 
parks and public grounds is under the direction of the city 
engineer, who is also, at the present time, a member of the 
Public Welfare and Recreation Commission. 

About seventy-four acres are maintained as parks and 
playgrounds and approximately a mile of city boulevard ; 64 
acres are owned by the city and certain areas owned by pri- 
vate parties are turned over to the city for recreation pur- 
poses, also satisfactory arrangements have been made for a 
number of years whereby the city has the use of Tufts College 
playfields during the summer vacation months, and skating 
areas in the winter. Approximately two thousand trees of 
various varieties are located on these grounds. 

These areas when completely developed will compare 
favorably with other cities in the vicinity. 

Some of the larger parks and playgrounds have been 
renamed in honor of Somerville young men who lost their lives 
in the World War. 

The general maintenance of the grounds includes — mow- 
ing lawns, repairing and edging walks, — grading, rolling and 
keeping in condition baseball "diamonds,'' football fields, 
tennis courts, and children's playing areas, — planting bulbs, 
flowers, trees, shrubs, and weeding, watering and pruning 
same, — plowing, harrowing and fertilizing school garden 
areas, — repairing city boulevard and park roads and treating 
with road application, — repairing and painting fences, back- 
stops, flagpoles, settees, pla} r ground apparatus, drinking foun- 
tains, etc. — during the winter, removing snow from drives, 
walks, sanding when necessary, flooding ponds, artificial 
areas, hockey rinks and keeping same in condition for skating 
and playing of games. 

The number of men employed has varied from seven to 
fifteen per week. 



CITY ENGINEER. 



161 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNTS, STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, 



1922. 



Playgrounds 
$4,332 80 Labor 
1,083 14 

788 58 

154 47 

136 48 



$6,495 47 



Teaming 

Equipment — Improvement — Supplies 

Repairing property and tools 

Fountains and Bubblers — Maint. (Paid Water 

Dept) 

Trees — Plants — Floral Decorations 
Flagpoles — Flags — Painting 

Total Expenditures . 



Parki 


$7,778 


84 


903 


52 


1,063 


63 


446 


07 


358 


69 


736 


60 


95 


80 


$11,383 15 



CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES. 

Playgrounds 

and 
Recreation Parks 

$ 444 41 Central Hill Park (13.1 acres) .... $2,534 67 
583 58 Saxton C. Foss Park (formerly Broadway 

Park) (15.9 acres) 1,612 71 

Broadway Parkway (1.6 acres) . . . 168 20 

1,395 83 Lincoln Park (7.2 acres) 955 34 

11 26 Prospect Hill Park (2.6 acres) .... 1,814 42 

Tufts Park (4.5 acres) 1,258 22 

Paul Revere Park (0.02 acre) .... 664 65 

Belmont Street Park (0.4 acre) ... 599 28 

Powder House Boulevard (0.9 mile long) . 907 34 

Powder House Square Parkway (0.2 acre) . 83 20 

Cemetery, Somerville Avenue (0.7 acre) . . 206 50 

923 94 Dilboy Field (formerly Somerville Field) at 

Alewife Brook (11.5 acres) .... 448 82 

680 91 Richard Trum Playground, Cedar street and 

Broadway (4.3 acres) 35 24 

327 24 Playground, Glen street and Oliver street (0.9 

acre + 1-5 acres private land) ... 11 78 

827 81 Playground, Kent street and Somerville 

avenue (0.8 acre) 67 78 

164 51 Playground, Poplar street and Joy street (0.5 

acre) 14 00 

10 00 Playground, Beacon street near Washington 

street (0.2 acre) 

174 36 Playground, Mason street and Broadway 

Tennis Court (0.3 acre) .... 

305 50 Playground, Fellsway East (2.5 acres private 

land) 

234 62 Tufts College Land, Summer and Winter Play- 
ground (5 acres) 

72 00 Plowing, harrowing and fertilizing Park and 
Playground areas for planting . 



162 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

339 50 Plowing, harrowing*, teaming, etc., for Welfare 
and Recreation Commission (Private 

Land) 

Total expenditure, maintenance (73.7 acres) 
64 acres city property + 9 acres private 
land, 0.7 acre cemetery and 0.9 mile boule- 
vard, and 0.54 mile parkway roads 



$6,495 47 $11,383 15 

300 00 Transfer to City Engineer Account . 



$6,795 47 



CREDIT. 

JTaygxounds 
and 
Recreation Parks 

Appropriation for Parks $11,450 00 

$6,510 00 Appropriation for Playgrounds .... 

299 50 Received from Public Welfare and Recrea- 
tion Commission ...... 

40 25 Received from Celebrations Account 



$6,849 75 Total Credit .... $11,450 00 



$54 28 Balance unexpended . . . $66.85 

The city's assessment for Metropolitan parks and boule- 
vards for the year 1922 amounted to $18,387.91 on construc- 
tion account, and $42,998.76 being the proportional cost for 
maintenance and operation; in addition to this the city's spe- 
cial assessment for the Charles River basin construction and 
maintenance amounted to $8,923.72; for the improvement of 
Alewife Brook and maintenance of same $1,083.37 and for the 
maintenance of Wellington Bridge across Mystic River, $3,- 
352.75. The total of these assessments amounts to $74,746.51, 
being Soinerville's proportional payment to the State on ac- 
count of the Metropolitan park system for the year 1922. 

The total assessment paid to the State for parks and 
boulevards amounts to $990,273.74, January 1, 1923 and the 
length of State boulevard at present constructed in this 
city consists of seven-tenths of a mile of double roadway, lo- 
cated in the easterly part of the city and extending between 
Broadway and Mystic River, and one and two-tenths miles 
bordering Mystic River and Alewife Brook located in the 
westerly part of the city. 

A special state commission has been appointed to report 
a route and estimated cost of constructing a cross-town boule- 
vard and traffic road which will probably pass through the 
easterly part of this city 



CITY ENGINEER. 163 

A number of young maple trees have been planted on the 
Powder House Boulevard where the old poplars were up- 
rooted, broken and split during terrific wind, rain and ice 
storms, the abutting property owners paying for the trees, 
this department the planting — new hardy growth trees should 
replace the old poplar trees the entire length of the boulevard 
immediately. A section of this boulevard where the roadway 
has deteriorated, about 2,800 feet in length, should be re- 
constructed with an asphaltic macadam wearing surface (no 
reconstruction work having been done since the original con- 
struction in 1901.) 

Paul Revere Park, occasionally termed the smallest park 
in the world, has been improved — inside granite curbing was 
set, on top of this a low iron fence was erected and grano- 
lithic sidewalk constructed; this area should be enlarged by 
acquiring additional land and constructing a passageway 
acrosss from Main street to Broadway, separating the city's 
park from the adjoining land, thereby preserving an historical 
spot on the top of Winter Hill for the future, also making a. 
convenient connection for travel. 

This division has had the supervision and work of plow- 
ing, harrowing, and preparing various parcels of private land 
and park areas for planting purposes, at a cost of $411.50, 
and many school children have devoted their time and energies 
to the raising of vegetables. 

Athletics in general have been very active since the war 
and the baseball "diamonds," football fields, tennis courts 
and athletic apparatus located on the various playfields have 
been in constant use. 

During the Daylight Saving period "twilight" baseball 
has been exceedingly popular, practically all of the city's 
fields being used, and at Lincoln Park games were scheduled 
for every evening during the season with crowds in attendance. 
Approximately 500 games were scheduled on the city's play- 
fields during the year. 

Special supervision was provided by the Welfare and 
Recreation Commission during the months of July and Au- 
gust, especially for the children's activities, to make the 
playgrounds popular and successful. 

Additional seats have been erected at Lincoln Park and 
Trum Playground and hockey rinks of regulation size were 
constructed in the winter season. 

Shower baths have been maintained in the highway stable 
building at the Trum Playground and the baths located at 
Lincoln Park have been kept open certain evenings during 
each week; more of these baths should be established at the 
various fields. Wading pools for the children have been 



164 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

maintained at these two places; — probably a new field house 
and public comfort station will be erected the coming year 
on Trum Playground, eliminating the use of the stable build- 
ing. 

Tennis courts have been in use at Mason Street play- 
ground, Dilboy Field, Broadway, Central Hill and Lincoln 
parks. 

The Metropolitan District Commission have furnished 
band concerts, certain evenings during summer months, at 
Broadway Park. 

At the enclosed athletic field bordering Alewife Brook, 
a permanent concrete field house should be constructed with 
all modern equipment (about $10,000 is available at the pres- 
ent time) and the remaining area graded as soon as possible; 
when completed as originally designed the city will own one 
of the best recreation fields in the vicinity. (In the 1910 
report, plan shows proposed complete laying out). 

The Mason street tennis lot, corner of Broadway, is to be 
sold to private parties for building purposes and the money 
received for same used in grading the proposed new play- 
ground area situated between Broadway and Holland street; 
located on the south-westerly part of this area, the Western 
Junior High School building is just being completed. There 
seems to be a growing demand for recreation fields to be lo- 
cated at the school buildings for the use of school athletics. 

The city has become so densely populated (averaging 
nearly 25,000 people a square mile) that some of the larger 
park areas should be more extensively utilized for public re- 
creation and physical training purposes ; on several of the 
playfields concrete buildings should be constructed in place 
of some of the old wooden structures, additional apparatus 
and shelters provided on some of the principal parks and 
playgrounds for the smaller children's pleasure, where a regu- 
lar park employee can have the care of the same, and some 
of the smaller playground areas should be enclosed by wire 
fencing for the protection of children. 

In certain localities of the city, well-lighted playgrounds, 
during the summer evenings, should be maintained for the 
young men and women working in the factories daily. 

A splendid opportunity exists at the present time to 
establish a good sized recreation field for the East Somerville. 
and Winter Hill districts by developing the northeasterly 
end of Foss Park, (formerly Broadway Park) the city owns 
the land, so that any expenditure made would be wholly for 
construction purposes. The area of this park is approximately 
16 acres, and the topography has not been changed in 50 
years time, (the enclosed area of the athletic field, bordering 



CITY ENGINEER. 165 

Alewife Brook, in the westerly part of the city is about 5 
acres). 

A plan has been made showing a re-designing and new 
layout of Foss Park area which would be, when completely 
constructed, an additional playfield and beneficial in a num- 
ber of ways for the easterly part of the city. 

In connection with the departmental work the Welfare 
and Recreation Commission, the Playgrounds Association and 
Women's Clubs have been of great assistance in advising, di- 
recting and promoting the city's welfare. (Details, etc., in 
Commission's and Association reports). 

The total expenditure by the city departments and other 
Associations for recreation and play the past year has been 
approximately $20,000.00. 



APPENDED TABLE. 

Annexed to this report is a table giving names of all 
streets in the city, public and private, lengths, widths, and 
the total mileage; in the 1910 report, tables were published 
showing old names of certain streets as formerly known, and 
names of public squares in the city. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ernest W. Bailey, 

City Engineer. 



166 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION, LENGTH AND WIDTH OF 
PUBLIC AND PRIVATE STREETS. 

Public Width Length. 

Street From To or in 

Private. Feet. Public Private 

Abdell Soraerville ave Southwesterly Private. 25 203 

Aberdeen road Cedar st. Highland ave. Public. 40 449 ...... 

Aberdeen rd. ex.Angle Westerly Private. 30 67 

Acadia pk. Somerville ave Northeasterly Public. 40 256 ...... 

Adams Broadway Medford st. Public. 40 907 — 

Adelaide rd Somerville ave Northeasterly Private. 20 138 

Adrian Marion st. Joseph st. Public. 40 579 — 

Albion pi. Albion st. Northeasterly Private. 10 166 

Albion ct. Albion st. Southeasterly Private. 16 116 

Albion Central st. Cedar st. Public. 40 2,742 

Albion Broadway Medford line Private. 50 100 

Albion ter. Albion st. Southwesterly Public. 25 100 

Aldersey Walnut st. Vinal ave. Public. 40 508 — 

Aldrich Pearl st. B. & L. R. R. Public. 40 611 

JJAlewifeBrkpkjMystic Val. pky. Cambridge line Public. .'..... 4,775 

Alfred Broadway Medford line Private. 50 50 

Allen Somerville ave Charlestown st. Public. 25 644 

Allen ct Park st. Northwesterly Private. 20 150 

Alpine Cedar st. Southeasterly Public. 30 667 

Alpine Alpine st. Lowsll st. Public. 40 688 

Alston Cross st. Shawmut st. Public. 40-30 757 

Ames Bartlett st. Robinson st. Public. 40 580 

Appleton Willow ave. Liberty ave. Public. 40 668 

Arlington Franklin st. Lincoln st. Public. 40 452 — 

Arnold ave Porter st. Southeasterly Private. 15 127 

Arnold ct. Beacon st. Northeasterly Private. 10 115 

Arthur ct. Linden st. Easterly Private, about 10 100 

Arthur Broadway Bonair st. Public. 40 438 

Ash ave. Meacham st. East Albion st. Public. 40 554 ...... 

Ash ave. East Albion st. Northeasterly Private. 40 151 

Ashland Summer st. Sartwell ave. Public. 30 478 

Atherton Central st. Spring st. Public. 40 741 

Auburn ave. Cross st. B. & L. R. R. Public. 30 606 

Austin Broadway Mystic ave. Public. 40 716 

Autumn Broadway Bonair st. Public. 20 408 ...... 

Avon School st. Central st. Public. 40 1,360 ...— 

Avon pL Cross st. B. & L. R. R. Private. 25 150 

Bailey North st. West Adams st. Public. 40 420 

Banks Elm st. Summer st. Public. 40 639 

Bartlett Vernon st. Broadway Public. 40 1,550 

Barton Broadway Hamilton road Public. 40 382 

Bay State ave. Broadway Foskett st. Public. 40 1,237 

Beach ave. Webster ave. Columbia st. Private, about 20 200 

Beacon pL. Beacon st. Northeasterly Private. 15 200 

Beacon E. Cambridge lineSomerville ave. Public. 66 6,007 

Beacon ter. Somerville ave. Northeasterly Private. 24 110 

Bean ter. Cutter st. Southeasterly Private. 16 100 

Beckwith circle Beacon st. Southwesterly Private. 28.5 112 

Bedford South st. Cambridge line Public. 30 165 

Beech Somerville ave. Atherton st. Public. 40 323 ...... 

Belknap Broadway Hamilton road Public. 40 449 

Bellevue ter. Albion st. Northeasterly Private. 20 90 

Belmont Somerville ave Highland ave. Public. 40 2,192 

Belmont pi. Belmont st. Southeasterly Public. 25 177 

Belmont sq. Belmont st. Southeasterly Public. 30 75 

Belmont sq. End of above N. E. & S. W. Public. 20 145 

Belmont ter. Belmont st. Easterly Private. 15 187 

Benedict ave. Broadway Benedict st. Private. 20 200 

Benedict Union st. Austin st. Public. 40 585 

Bennett ct. Bennett st. Prospect st. Private. 10 100 

Bennett Prospect st. Bennett ct. Private. 40 to 25 400 

Benton road Summer st. Hudson st. Public. 40 1,208 

Berkeley School st. Central st. Public. 40 1,860 

Berwick Hinckley st. Northwesterly Private. 20 170 

Rigelow Boston st. Munroe st. Public. 50 208 

Billingham Broadway William st. Public. 40 563 

ttMetropolitan Park Commission Boulevard. 



CITY ENGINEER. 



167 



Street 

Bishop's pi. 
Blakeley ave. 
Bleachery ct. 
Bolton 
Bonair 
Bond 

Bonner ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



Broadway 
Broadway 
Highland road 
Prichard ave. 



Boston ave. 

Boston ave. 

Boston 

Boston 

Bow 

Bow 

Bowdoin 

Bowers ave. 

Bow St. pi. 

Bradford ave. 

Bradley 

Braemore road Broadway 

Brastow ave. Lowell st. 



Private. 

Private. 
Public. 



10 

40 
30 
40 
40 
40 
40 
60 
50 
65 
50 
50 



School st. 
Pearl st. 



Bristol road 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway pi. 

Bromfield road Warner st 

Brook Glen at. 

Browning road Sycamore st. 

Buckingham Beacon st. 

Buena Vista rd. Holland st. 

Burnham Broadway 

Burnside ave. Elm st. 



Broadway 
Charlest'n line 
Cross st. 
Marshall st. 
Main st. 
Top of hill 
Albion st. 
Willow ave. 
Paulina st. 
Broadway 



Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 



Walter st. 

Medford line 

Porter st. 

Medford line 

Cross st. 

Marshall st. 

Main st. 

Top of hill 

Albion st. 

Willow ave. 

Paulina st. 

Arlington line 

Southwesterly 

Dearborn road 

Cross st. 

Central st. 

Dimick st. 

Southwesterly 

Pow. House Bl. £ u £L ic - 

Summer st. Public 



40 
40 
45 
40 
60 
50 
40 
24 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
100 



476 
1,535 
655 
376 
915 
80 
287 
509 



649 
640 
1,242 
658 
570 
341 



Pub. 100 to 200 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 



762 

'686 

146 

2,590 

2,060 

100 1,570 

100 to 90 1,030 

90 2,540 

90 to 70 1,030 

70 3,250 

65-60-65 3.220 

22 



Cady ave. 
Caldwell ave. 
Calvin 
Calvin 
Cambria 
Cameron ave. 
Campbell pk. 
Campbell Pk. pi 
Carlton 

Carter terrace 
Carter terrace 
Caruso pL 
Carver 
Cedar ave. 
Cedar ct. 
Cedar St. 
Cedar St, 
Cedar 

Central road 
Central 
Central 
Central 
Central 
Centre 
Chandler 
Chapel 
Chapel ct. 
Charles 



Pi. 
Pi. 



road 



Simpson ave. 
Washington st. 
Beacon st. 
Dimick st. 
Central st. 
Holland st. 
Meacham rd. 
Kingston st. 
Somerville ave. 
Summer st. 
Accepted part 
Medford st. 
Porter st. 
Cedar st. 
Cedar st. 
Murdock st. 
Cedar n Elm st. 
Elm st. 
Central st. 
Central road 
Somerville ave. 
Summer st. 
Medford st. 
Albion st. 
Park ave. 
College ave. 
Sycamore st. 
Washington st. 



Northwesterly 
Southerly 
Dimick st. 
Washington st. 
Benton road 
Cambridge line 
Kingston st. 
Arl'ton Br. R.R. 
Lake st. 
Southwesterly 
Southwesterly 
Easterly 
Northwesterly 
Linden ave. 
Southeasterly 
Southwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Broadway 
E'ly and N'ly 
Sycamore st. 
Summer st. 
Medford st. 
Broadway 
B. & L. R. R. 
Broadway 
Chandler st. 
Northwesterly 
Southerly 



Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 



40 
40 
40 
40 
35 
40 
40 

40 
20 
40 
30 
40 
60 
40 
20 
40 
40 

18+ 
10 
40 
22 
15 + 
20 
12+ 
40 
40 
30 to 15 
33 
40 
45 
35 
40 
40 
12 
30 



1,262 
504 
679 
292 

543 

720 



263 
392 
488 
1,065 
399 

'300 
171 



293 



4,137 
377 
221 
1,043 
2,539 
1,079 

1,232 
273 

*i66 



75 
6S0 
450 



Table 8howing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 

Public 
From To or 

Private 

Glen st. Easterly ?1 va J e 

Fellsway east Cross st. Private 

Somerville ave. Fitchburg R.R Private 

Oak st. Houghton st Public. 

Cross st. Walnut st. E U J>H C " 

Broadway Jaques st. £ U !?J- C - 

Washington st. Columbus ave. Public. 

Medford line Mystic river Public. 

Medford line Public. 

Highland road Public. 

Prichard ave. Public 

East to angle 
in street 
Angle in st. s'ly Kidder ave. 
Kidder ave. Morrison ave. 

Washington st. Prosp't Hill av. Public 

Prosp't Hill av. Walnut st. £ u £j! c 

Union sq. Wesley sq. S u 5Il c ' 

Wesley sq. Somerville ave. Public 

Washington st. Lincoln park Public 
Cottage ave. Elm st. 
Bow st. Northwesterly 

Southeasterly 



146 
376 



288 
300 
150 



250 



276 



20S 
210 



84 



4S 

110 
156 

70+ 

378 

80+ 



200 

iso 



168 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 

Public Width Length 

or in 

Private Feet Public Private 



Street 

Charlestown 

Charnwood rd. 

•Chelsea 

Cherry 

Cherry 

Chester 

Chester ave. 

Chester ave. 

Chester pi. 

Chestnut 

Chetwynd road 

Church 

City road 

Claremon 

Clarendon ave. 

Clark 

Cleveland 

Clifton 

Clifton 

Clyde 

College ave. 

College Cir. 

College Hill rd. 

Columbia 

Columbia ct. 

Columbus ave. 

Concord ave. 

Concord ave. 

Congress pL 

Conlon ct. 

Connecticut av. 

Conwell ave. 
Conwell 
Cooney 

Corinthian road 
Cottage ave. 

Cottage circle 

Cottage pi. 

Craigie 

Craigie ter. 

Crescent 

Crescent 

Crocker 

Cross 

Cross st. (East) 

Cross St. pi. 

Crown 

•Cummings 

Curtis ave. 

Curtis 

Cutler 

Cutter ave. 

Cutter pk. 

Cutter 

Cypress 

Dana 

Dane 

Dane ave. 

Dante terrace 

Dartmouth 

Day 

Dearborn road 

Delaware 

Dell 

Derby 

Dexter 

Dickinson 

Dickson 

Dimick 



From To 

Allen st. Merriam st. 

Willow ave. Hancock st. 

Mystic ave. Melrose st. 

Elm st. Highland ave. 

Highland ave. Northeasterly 

Elm st. Cambridge line 

Medford st. Angle 

Angle Cross st. 

Chester st. Northwesterly 

Poplar st. Southeasterly 

Curtis st. West Adams st. 

Summer st. Lake st. 

Broadway Cedar st. 

Holland st. Mead st. 

Broadway Cambridge line 

Newton st. Lincoln pky. 

Central st. Harvard st. 

Appleton st. Morrison ave. 

Morrison ave. Arlngtn Br. RR 

Cedar st. Murdock st. 

Davis sq. Medford line 
College av. around to College av 

Conwell ave. North st. 

Webster ave. Cambridge line 

Columbia st. Webster ave. 
Washington st. Walnut st. 

Prospect st. Wyatt st. 

Wyatt st. Beacon st. 

Somerville ave. Linwood st. 

Columbia st. . Easterly 



Mystic ave. 
Curtis st. 
Highland ave. 
Beacon st. 
Broadway 
Russell st. 
Cottage ave 



Penn. ave. 
North st. 
Southwesterly 
Line st. 
Cady ave. 
Chester st. 
Southwesterly 



Washington st. Northwesterly 
Somerville ave. Summer st. 
16 Craigie st. Westerly 



Boston line 
Hadley st. 
Highland ave. 
Medford st. 
Broadway 
Cross st. 
Porter st. 
Fellsway 
Curtis st. 
Broadway 
Hinckley st. 
Summer st. 
Cutter ave. 
Broadway 
Central st. 

Pearl st. 
Somerville ave. 
Dane st. 
Craigie st. 
Medford st. 
Elm st. 
Boston ave. 
Pearl st. 
Glen st. 
Temple st. 
Broadway 
Springfield st. 
Broadway 
Concord ave. 



Hadley st. 
Pearl st. 
Crown st. 
Broadway 
Mystic ave. 
Northwesterly 
Lowell st. 
Middlesex ave. 
Hillsdale road 
Medford line 
Northwesterly 
Highland ave. 
Northwesterly 
Webster st. 
Beech st. 

Bonair st. 
Washington st. 
Leland st. 
Westerly 
Broadway 
Cambridge line 
College ave. 
Aldrich st. 
Tufts st. 
Wheatland st. 
Medford line 
Beacon st. 
Fairmount ave. 
Calvin st. 



Private. 15 .... 

Public. 40 589 

Private. 50 .... 

Public. 45 1,450 

Private. 45 .... 

Public. 40 885 
Public, about 22 220 

Public. 20 451 

Private. 40 .... 

Public. 40 537 

Private. 40 

Public. 40 964 

Private. 45 

Public. 40 560 

Public. 40 1,217 

Public. 35 552 

Public. 40 459 

Public. 40 200 

Private. 40 

Public. 30 664 

Public. 60 4,080 

.Private. 10 and 12 

Public. 40 449 

Public. 40 816 

Private. 9 

Public. 40 1,425 

Public. 40 1,483 

Public. 30 472 

Public. 50 202 

Private. 20 

Public. 40 487 

Public. 40 1,346 

Public. 35 363 

Public. 30 245 

Private. 40 .... 

Public. 40 550 

Private. 25 

Private, about 11 .... 

Public. 50 1,280 

Private. 25 

Public 30 and 22 387 

Public. 30 174 

Public. 40 528 

Public. 45 2,680 

Public. 40 1,100 

Private. 24 

Private. 30 

Private. 40 

Public. 40 654 

Public. 40 2,357 

Private. 20 

Public. 40 480 

Private. 12 

Public. 40 730 

Public. 40 262 



Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 



40 
40 
30 
25 
40 
40 
50 
40 
40 
40 
50 
40 
40 
40 



696 

1,341 

569 

l',465 
908 
469 
451 
466 

1.031 

'770 
271 
957 



400 

1.390 

'iio 
'266 

'892 
*980 



220 
"284 

"iso 

'266 

* * • • 

560 

'87 
150 

iii 



150 
700 
615 



170 
*83 



125 



25 



'Proposed. 



CITY ENGINEER. 



169 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 









Public 


Width 


Length 




Street 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private 


Feet Public Private 


Dix pi. 


Linwood st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


10 


.... 


100 


Douglas ave. 


Edgar ave. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


30 


.... 


162 


Dover 


Elm st. 


Cambridge line Public. 


40 


975 




Dow 


Powder House Ware st. 

T3A 


Private. 


40 





257 


Downer pi. 


no.. 
Downer st. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 


20 




125 


Downer 


Nashua st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


120 


Dresden circle 


Cutter ave. 


Westerly 


Private. 


30 


.... 


133 


Durant 


Washington st 


. Southerly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


200 


Durham 


Beacon st. 


Hanson st. 


Public. 


40 


423 


. . . 


Dynamo 


Willow ave. 


Whipple st. 


Private. 


30 




255 


Earle 


South st. 


Northerly 


Private. 


30 





322 


Earle 


End of above 


Fitchburg R. R 


. Private. 


15 


.... 


115 


East Albion 


Mt. Vernon 


E. of Moreland Private. 


25 





188 


East Albion 


ave. »l. 
E. of MorelandMedford line 


Private. 


40 





490 


Eastman road 


St. 

Highland ave. 


Southwesterly 


Public. 


40 


296 


... 


Edgar ave. 


Ma in st. 


Meacham st. 


Private. 


50 


.... 


800 


♦Edgeworth 


Mystic ave. 


Melrose st. 


Private. 


50 


1,380 


Edmands 


Broadway 


near Bonair st 


. Public. 


40 


376 


. . . 


Edmonton ave. 


Cross st. 


Fellsway east 


Private. 


40 


.... 


630 


Electric ave. 


Mason st. 


Curtis st. 


Public. 


40 


1,374 


. . . 


Eliot 


Vine st. 


Park st. 


Public. 


40 


291 


. . . 


Ellington road Highland ave. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


35 


.... 


120 


Ellington road Ellington road 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


30 


.... 


265 


Ellsworth 


Cross st. 


Rush st. 


Public. 


40 


230 


. . • 


Elm ct. 


Villa ave. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


18 


.... 


70 


Elm pi. 


Harvard st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


30 


.... 


190 


Elm road 


Elm st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


25 




183 


Elm 


Somerville ave. Cherry st. 


Public. 


63 


1,672 


. . • 


Elm 


Cherry st. 


White st. 


Public. 


63 to 6C 


330 


• . . 


Elm 


White st. 


Banks st. 


Public. 


60 


660 


. . . 


Elm 


Banks st. 


Beech st. 


Public. 


60 to 77.5 290 


• . . 


Elm 


Beech st. 


Tenney st. 


Public. 


77.5 to 60 


570 


. . . 


Elm 


Tenney st. 


Davis sq. 


Public. 


60 


1,429 


* . . 


Elmwood 


Holland st. 


Cambridge line Public. 


40 


1.057 


. . . 


Elmwood ter. 


Elmwood st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


20 


• • • • 


190 


Elston 


Elm st. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


40 


396 


• • • 


Emerson 


Everett st. 


Newton st. 


Private. 


30 


* • • • 


170 


Endicott ave. 


Broadway 


Woodstock st. 
(Ext'n) 


Private. 


40 





800 


Essex 


Medford st. 


Richdale ave. 


Public. 


40 


232 


• • • 


Eustis 


Beacon st. 


Cambridge line Public. 


30 


146 


• • • 


Everett ave. 


Cross st. 


Dana st. 


Public. 


40 


845 




Everett 


Webster ave. 


Newton st. 


Private. 


30 




350 


Evergreen ave. 


Marshall st. 


Sycamore st. 


Public. 


40 


1,320 


• • • 


Evergreen sq. 


Porter st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


22 




179 


Exchange pi. 


Washington st. Southerly 


Private. 


4.5 





70 


•Fairfax 


North st. 


Powder House Private. 


40 




915 






Blvd. 










Fairlee 


Cherry st. 


Northwesterly 


Public. 


30 


144 




Pairmount ave. 


Curtis st. 


Northwesterly 


Public. 


40 


679 




Pairview ter. 


Sycamore st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


15 




173 


Parragut ave. 


Broadway 


Woodstock st. 


Public. 


40 


905 


... 


tJFellsway 


Mystic ave. 


(Ext'n) 
Mystic river 


Public. 


70 to 130 


2,500 




tJFellsway east 












(Winthrop 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


" 50 


1,222 




ave.) 














UFellsway West 












(Chauncey) 
ave.) 
Fennell 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


50 


1,324 


... 


Hinckley st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 





175 


Penwick 


Broadway 


Jaques st. 


Public. 


40 


601 


• • • 


Fisk ave. 


Lowell st. 


Hinckley st. 


Public. 


20 


484 


• • • 


Fitchburg ct. 


Fitchburg st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


10 


.... 


226 



•Proposed. 

ttMetropolitan Park Commission Boulevard. 



170 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 









Public 


Width 


Length 


Street 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private 


Feet Public Private 


Fitchburgr 


Linwood st. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 


40 




400 


Flint ave. 


Flint st. 


Northerly 


Public. 


40 


202 


• ♦ • • 


Flint 


Franklin st. 


Aldrich st. 


Public. 


40 


1,790 


• • • • 


Florence 


Washington st. 


Perkins st. 


Public. 


40 


1,304 


• • • • 


Florence tear. 


Jaques st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


90 


Forest 


Beacon st. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


117 


.... 


Forster 


Sycamore st. 


Central st. 


Private. 


30 


.... 


430 


Foskett 


Willow ave. 


Liberty ave. 


Public. 


40 


668 


• • • • 


Fountain ave. 


Cross st. 


Glen st. 


Public. 


30 


578 


• • • • 


Francesca ave. 


College ave. 


Liberty ave. 


Public. 


40 


762 


• • > • 


Francis 


Porter st. 


Conwell st. 


Public. 


30 


180 


ft ft ft a 


Franklin ave. 


Washington st 


. Franklin st. 


Public. 


20 


575 


# # . . 


Franklin pi. 


Franklin st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


15 


.... 


100 


Franklin 


Broadway 


Washington st. Public. 


40+ 


2,316 


.... 


Fremont ave. 


Bowdoin st. 


Lincoln pk. 


Public. 


30 


232 


• • • • 


Fremont 


Main st. 


Nr E. Albion st Public. 


40 


1,112 


• • • • 


Fremont 


Nr E. Albion st Mystic ave. 


Private. 


40 





335 


Garden ct. 


Somerville ave 


. Fitchburg R. R. Private. 


25 




370 


Garfield ave. 


Broadway 


Blakeley ave. 


Public. 


40 


'447 


.... 


Garfield ave. 


Blakeley ave. 


Middlesex ave. 


Private. 


40 


• • • a 


983 


Garrison ave. 


Broadway 


Land of City 
of Camb. 


Public. 


40 


460 





Garrison ave. 


Land City of 
Camb. 


Woodstock st. 
(Ext'n) 


Private. 


40 


.... 


390 


George 


Broadway 


Lincoln ave. 


Public. 


30 


275 


.... 


Gibbens 


Central st. 


Benton rd f w'ly Public. 


40 


665 


.... 


Giles pk. 


Walnut st. 


Northwesterly 


Public. 


32.71 


167 


.... 


Gill's ct. 


Franklin st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


10 


.... 


100 


Gilman 


Cross st. 


Walnut st. 


Public. 


40 


1,430 


.... 


Gilman ter. 


Pearl st. 


Northeasterly 


Public. 


40 


360 


.... 


Gilson ter. 


Linden ave. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


124 


Glen 


Broadway 


Tufts st. 


Public. 


40 


2,373 


.... 


Glendale ave. 


Cameron ave. 


Yorktown st. 


Public. 


40 


410 


.... 


Glen wood road Vernon st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


1,524 


.... 


Glover circle 


Meacham road Southeasterly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


110 


Gordon st. 


North st. 


Alewife Brk PkyPublic. 


40 


1,254 


■ ••« 


Gorham 


Holland st. 


Howard st. 


Public. 


40 


763 


.... 


Gould ave. 


Porter st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


16 


• • • • 


166 


Gove ct. 


Cedar st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


18 


• • • • 


144 


Grand View a? 


Walnut st. 


Vinal ave. 


Public. 


40 


542 


.... 


Granite 


Somerville ave. 


Osgood st. 


Public. 


40 


411 


.... 


Grant 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


40 


1,405 


.... 


Greene 


Summer st. 


Laurel st. 


Public. 


40 


555 


.... 


Greenville 


Medford st. 


Munroe st. 


Public. 


40 


660 


.... 


Greenville ter. 


Greenville st. 


Northerly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


250 


Greenwood ter 


Beacon st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


25 


.... 


165 


Gritter way 


College ave. 


Bromfield rd. 


Private. 


4 


.... 


160 


Grove 


Elm st. 


Morrison ave. 


Public. 


40 


996 





Hadley ct. 


Franklin st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


16 




74 


Hall ave. 


College ave. 


Liberty ave. 


Public. 


40 


'926 


.... 


Hall 


Cedar st. 


Cherry st. 


Public. 


30 


456 


.... 


Hamlet 


Highland ave. 


Boston st. 


Public. 


30 


616 


.... 


Hamilton road 


Russell road 


North st. 


Public. 


40 


560 


.... 


Hammond 


Dickinson st. 


Concord ave. 


Public. 


40 


267 


.... 


Hancock 


Elm st. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


40 


1,349 


.... 


Hancock 


Highland ave. 


Lexington ave. 


Public. 


50 


376 


.... 


Hanson ave. 


Hanson st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


30 


.... 


252 


Hanson 


Washington st 


Skehan st. 


Public. 


30 


469 


.... 


Hanson 


Skehan st. 


Vine st. 


Public. 


35 


347 . 


.... 


Hard an road 


Pow. House Bd.Ware st. 


Private. 


20 and 40 


283 


Harding 


No. of Ward st. 


Cambridge line Public. 


30 


465 


.... 


Harold 


Dimick st. 


Marion st. 


Public. 


40 


316 


.... 


Harold st. 


Woods ave. 


Medford Line 


Private 


40 


.... 


248 


Harrison 


Ivaloo st. 


Kent st. 


Public. 


40 


644 


.... 


Harrison 


Elmwood st. 


Southeasterly 


Public. 


40 


• • • • 


210 


Harvard pi. 


Harvard st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


35 


• • • * 


200 


Harvard 


Summer st. 


Beech st. 


Public. 


40 


717 


.... 


Hathorn 


Broadway 


Arlington st. 


Public. 


40 


339 


.... 


Hawkins 


Somerville ave. 


Washington st. Public. 


40 


330 


.... 


Hawthorne 


Willow ave. 


Cutter ave. 


Public. 


30 


807 


. . . . 



CITY ENGINEER. 



171 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 

Public Width Length 

or in 

Private Feet Public Private 



Street From 



Hayden ter. 
Heath 
Heath 
Henderson 
Hennessy ct. 
Henrietta ct. 
Henry ave. 
Herbert 
Hersey 
Higgins ct. 
High 

Highland ave. 
Highland path, 

east 
Highland path, 

west 
fHighland rd. 
Hill 

Hillsdale rd. 
Hillside ave. 
Hillside cir. 
Hillside pk. 
Hinckley 
Hodgdon pi. 
Holland 
Holt's ave. 
Holyoke road 
Homer sq. 
Horace 
Houghton 
Howard 
Howe 
Hudson 
Hunting 

Ibbetson 
Illinois ave. 
Indiana ave. 
Irving 
Ivaloo 



Linden ave. 
Temple st. 
Bond st. 
Richardson st. 
Medford st. 
Somerville ave, 
Highland ave. 
Chester st. 
Berkeley st. 
Mt. Vernon st. 
North st. 
Medford st. 
Morrison ave. 

Morrison ave. 

Morrison ave. 
Broadway 
Conwell ave. 
Pearl st. 
Craigie st. 
Walnut st. 
Broadway 
Dane ave. 
Davis sq. 
Oak st. 

Elm st. around 
Bonner ave. 
South st. 
Springfield st. 
Thorndike st. 
Marshall st. 
Central st. 
South st. 



To 

Easterly 
Bond st. 
Moreland st. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Fisk ave. 
Northerly 
Lexington ave. 
Day st. 
Oxford st. 
Westerly 
Pow. House Bd 
Davis sq. 
Arlington Br. 

R. R. 
Arlington Br. 

R. R. 
Boston ave. 
Fairmount ave. 
Sunset rd. 
Southwesterly 
Westerly 
Northwesterly 
B. & L. R. R. 
Northeasterly 
Broadway 
Southeasterly 
to Elm st. 
Northwesterly 
Fitchburg R. R. 
Cambridge line 
Gorham street 
School st. 
Cedar st. 
Cambridge line 



Private. 20 

Public. 45 

Public. 40 

Public. 20 

Private. 20 
Private. 8 and 20 

Public. 40 



Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 



40 
40 
16 
40 
60 
10 



1,043 
754 
569 



290 
337 



9,135 



Private. 10 

Pub. 30(70wide) 1,499 



Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 



40 
40 
30 
16 
40 



284 
632 



196 



Public. 30 and 35 1,081 
Private, about 20 .... 



Somerville ave. Lowell st. 
Broadway Penn. ave. 

Broadway Penn. ave. 

Holland st. Broadway 

Beacon st. Park st. 



Pi. 



James 

Jaques 

Jaques 

Jaques 

Jasper 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jerome ct. 

Jerome 

Jerome 

Joseph 

Josephine 

Joy 

Joy St. pi. 



Pearl st. 
Fellsway west 
Temple st. 
Bond st. 
Walnut st. 
Pearl st. 
Holland st. 
Sycamore st. 
Montrose st. 
Lawrence rd. 
Newton st. 
ave. Morrison ave. 
Washington st. 
Joy st. 



Kenneson road 
Kensington av. 
•Kensington av 
Kent ct. 
Kent 
Kent 
Kenwood 
Kidder ave. 
Kilby 

Kilsyth road 
Kimball 
Kingman road 
Kingston 



Broadway 
Broadway 
Blakeley ave. 
Kent st. 
Somerville ave. 
Fitchburg R. R. 
College ave. 
College ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Broadway 
Lowell st. 
Washington st. 
Meacham road 



Radcliffe road 
Temple st. 
Bond st. 
Edgar ave. 
Easterly 
Gilman st. 
Howard st. 
Jerome st. 
Jerome ct. 
Mystic Val. py 
Lincoln pky 
Broadway 
Poplar st. 
Southwesterly 

Walnut road 
Blakeley ave. 
Middlesex ave. 
Northerly 
Fitchburg R. R 
Beacon st. 
Billingham st. 
Boston ave. 
Southwesterly 
Medford line 
Craigie st. 
Fitchburg R. R. 
Cambridge line 



Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Pulblic. 

Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 



60 

10 

40 

30+ 

30 

40 

40 

40 

40 

30 

40 
40 
40 
40 
40 

40 
40 
45 
40 
20 
40 
40 
10 
20 
40 
40 
45 
30 
16 



2,696 

*637 
200 
517 
653 
431 
445 
2,760 
117 

802 
427 
384 
1,180 
685 

320 

1,182 

1,005 

395 

283 
534 



458 
1,718 
1,121 



Private. 30 

Public. 40 
Private. 40 
Private, about 25 . 

Public. 40 

Public. 25 

Public. 40 

Public. 40 2, 

Private. 20 

Private. 40 

Private. 40 

Private. 25 

Public. 40 



455 



292 
386 
322 
554 



647 



120 



250 
161 



230 
149 
678 

ioi 

108 



150 
151 



150 

ioo 



80 



150 
125 
495 



168 

838 

l',i50 
420 



180 
5 

303 
400 



•Proposed. 

tRoadway (only) accepted 30 feet wide, full width of street 70 feet. 



172 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street 

Knapp 

Knowlton 

Knowlton 

Lake 

Lamson ct. 
Landers 
Langmaid ave. 
Latin way 
Laurel ave. 
Laurel 
Laurel ter. 
Lawrence road 
Lawson ter. 
Lee 
Leland 
Leon 

Leonard pi. 
Leonard 
Lesley ave. 
Leslie pi. 
Lester ter. 
Levy road 
Lewis 

Lexington ave. 
Lexington ave. 
Lexington ave. 
Liberty ave. 
Liberty rd. 
Lincoln ave. 
Lincoln pky 
Lincoln pi. 
Lincoln 
Linden ave. 
Linden circle 
Linden pi. 
Linden 
Line 

Linehan ct. 
Linwood pi. 
Linwood 
London 
Loring 

Louisburg pi. 
Lovell 

Lowden ave. 
Lowell 
Lowell 

Lowell circle 
Lowell ter. 

Madison 
Magnus ave. 
Magnus ave. 
Main 

Maine ave. 
Maine ter. 
•Maiden 
Mallet 
Malloy ct. 
Malvern ave. 
Mansfield 
Maple ave. 
Maple pi. 
Maple 

Mardel circle 
Marion 
Marshall 
Mason 
May pi. 

♦Proposed. 



From 

School st. 
Tufts st. 
End of above 

Hawkins st. 
Linwood st. 
School st. 
Broadway 
Professors row 
Laurel st. 
Somerville ave. 
Laurel st. 
Medford line 
Putnam st. 
Medford st. 
Washington st. 
Concord ave. 
Joy st. 
Broadway 
Highland ave. 
Highland ave. 
Meacham road 
Washington st. 
Magnus ave. 
Willow ave. 
Hancock st. 
Angle 
Broadway 
Morrison ave. 
Lincoln st. 
Washington st. 
Lincoln ave. 
Broadway 
Elm st. 
Linden ave. 
Linden ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Washington st. 
Linwood st. 
Linwood st. 
Washington st 
Linwood st. 
Somerville ave. 
Autumn st. 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Somerville ave. 
Summer st. 
Lowell st. 
Lowell st. 

School st. 
Washington st. 
Lewis st. 
Broadway 
Mystic ave. 
Maine ave. 
Mystic ave. 
Willow ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Cameron ave. 
Somerville ave. 
School st. 
Marshall st. 
Poplar st. 
Spring st. 
Concord ave. 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Hawkins st. 



Public 
To or 

Private 

Granite st. Public. 
N'E' line Est. 37Public. 

Oliver st. Private. 

Church st. Public. 

Poplar st. Private. 

Westerly Public. 

Heath st. Public. 

Talbot ave. Private. 

Northwesterly Private. 

Summer st. Public. 

Southeasterly Private. 
Mystic Val. py Private. 

Easterly Private. 

Richdale ave. Public. 

Dane ave. Public. 

Dickinson st. Public. 

Northeasterly Private. 
Pow. House Bd.Public. 
Lexington ave. Public. 

Northerly Private. 

Northwesterly Private. 

Camb. Line Private. 

Easterly Private. 

Hancock st. Public. 

Angle Public. 

Cedar st. Public. 

Appleton st. Public. 

Liberty ave. Private. 

Mt. Vernon at. Public. 

Perry st. Public. 

Northerly Private. 

Perkins st. Public. 

Cedar ave. Public. 

Southeasterly Private. 

Northwesterly Private. 
Charlestown st. Public. 

Cambridge line Public. 

Chestnut st. Private. 

Southwesterly Private. 

Fitchburg st. Public. 

B. & L. R. R. Private. 

Osgood st. Public. 

Easterly Private. 

Electric ave. Public. 

Foskett st. Public. 

Summer st. Public. 

Medford st. Public. 

Westerly Priv. 11 

Northwesterly Private. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 

40 379 

40 461 

40 464 



Sycamore st. Public. 

Lewis st. Public. 

Southerly Private. 

Medford line Public. 

Penn. ave. Public. 

Southeasterly Public. 

Melrose st. Private. 

Liberty ave. Public. 

Merriam ave. Private. 

Yorktown st. Public. 
Washington st. Public. 

Southeasterly Public. 

Maple ave. Private. 

Medford st. Public. 

Northwesterly Private. 

Dimlck st. Public. 

Pearl st. Public. 
Pow. House Bd. Public. 

Easterly Private. 



40 

20 

40 

30 

60 

18 

40 

23 

40 
5 

40 

40 

40 

13 + 

40 

40 

12 

20 

40 

40 

50 
45 to 40 

40 

40 

16 

30 

40 
9 

40 

45 

24 

20 

33 

33 
about 15 
about 12 

50 

40 

40 

13 

40 

40 

36 

40 
and 27.5 

20 

40 
40 
40 
50 
40 
32 
50 
40 
30 
40 
40 
40 

5 
30 

8 
40 
40 
40 
12 



840 

228 
353 



983 



385 
359 
155 

'450 
333 



624 

147 

578 

1,493 

*478 
1,520 

*550 
1,413 



587 
1,727 



2,114 

*4i3 

'385 
1,247 
1,259 
3,472 



891 

429 

'966 
379 
205 

*657 

*4l6 
735 

319 

*699 

i',iii 

1,650 
681 



370 



250 
125 

256 

585 
200 



98 



75 
190 
390 
416 



200 

• • • 

120 



120 
160 



200 
150 

840 

*90 



141 

150 



80 

• • • • 

1,860 
255 

i25 

"iio 

• • • • 

100 



CITY ENGINEER. 



173 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street 

McCarroll ct. 
McGregor ave. 

Meacham road 
Meacham 
Mead st. 
Mead st. 
Medford 
Medford 
Melrose 
Melvin 

Merriam aye. 
Merriam 
Merriam 
Michigan ave. 
fMiddlesex ave. 
Milk pi. 
Miller st. 
Milton 
Miner 

Minnesota ave. 
Mondamin ct. 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Montgomery av 
Montrose ct. 
Montrose 
Moore 
Moreland 
Morgan 
Morrison ave. 
Morrison ave. 
Morrison pi. 
Morrison pi. 
Mortimer pi. 
Morton 
Mossland 
Mountain ave. 
Mountain ave. 
Mousal pi. 
Mt. Pleasant ct 
Mt. Pleasant 
♦Mt. Vernon av 
Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Vernon 
Munroe 
Munroe 
Murdock 
Murray st. 
Museum 
Myrtle ct. 
Myrtle pi. 
Myrtle 
Mystic ave. 
ttMystic ave. 
Mystic 

{Mystic Valley 
Parkway 

Nashua 
Nevada ave. 
Newberne 
Newberne 

Newbury park 
Newbury 



From 

Clyde st. 
Wigglesworth 

st. 
Dover st. 
Mt. Vernon ave 
Moore st. 
End of above 
Cambridge line 
Central st. 
Mystic ave. 
Broadway 
Merriam st. 
Washington at. 
Somerville ave. 
Broadway 
Mystic ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Sacramento st 
Orchard st. 
Vernon st. 
Broadway 
Ivaloo st. 
Central st. 
End of above 
. Broadway 
Montrose st. 
School st. 
Holland st. 
Main st. 
Beacon st. 
Cedar st. 
Willow ave. 
Morrison ave. 
Morrison pi. 
Marshall st. 
Glen st. 
Somerville ave. 
Porter st. 
End acptd part 
No. Union st. 
Perkins st. 
Broadway 
.Meacham st. 
Washington st. 
Pearl st. 
Perkins st. 
Walnut st. 
End of above 
Cedar st. 
Washington st. 
Beacon st. 
Myrtle st. 
Myrtle st. 
Washington st. 
Charlest'n line 
Union st. 
Benedict st. 
Medford line 



Public 
To or 

Private 

Southwesterly Private. 
Walnut st. Private. 

Cambridge line Public. 
.Medford line Public. 

N'r Cameron av Public. 
Cameron ave Private 

Central st. Public. 

Broadway Public. 

Fellsway Private. 

Bonair st. Public. 

Malloy ct. Private. 

Somerville ave. Public. 

Charlestown st. Public. 

Penn. ave. Public. 

Fellsway Public. 

Southwesterly Private. 
Beacon st. Public. 

Cambridge line Public. 

Ames st. Public. 

Penn. ave. Public. 

Harrison st. Private. 

Westerly Public. 

Harvard st. Private. 

Wellington ave. Public. 

B. & L. R. R. Private. 

Sycamore st. Public. 

Mead st. Public. 

Mystic ave. Public. 

Park st. Public. 

Willow ave. Public. 

College ave. Public. 

Northerly Private. 

Easterly Private. 

Walter st. Private. 

Knowlton st. Public. 

Elm st. Public. 

nr Linden ave. Public. 

Linden ave. Private. 

B. & M. R. R. Private. 

Southwesterly Private. 

Perkins st. 

Mystic ave. 

Pearl st. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 

25 75 

13 .... 302 



Perkins st. 
Broadway 
Easterly 
Boston st. 
Clyde st. 
Southerly 



Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 



Cambridge line Public. 

Easterly Private. 

Westerly Private. 

Perkins st. Public. 

Union st. Public. 

Medford line Public 

Mystic ave. Public. 

Arlington line Public. 



40 
40 

40 
40 
50 
55 
50 
40 
15 
40 
30 
40 
60 
about 30 
30-33 
40 
40 
40 
25 
40 
35 
40 
12 
40 
40 
40 
40 
50 
40 
20 
15 
20 
40 
40 
22 
22 
20 
40 
33 
50 
40 
50 
40 
40 
50 
30 
30 
40 
10 

20+ 
40 
60 
66 
40 
60 



Richardson st. B. & L. R. R. 



Village st. 
Appleton st. 
Morrison ave. 

Newbury st. 
Holland st. 



Hanson st. 
Morrison ave. 
Arlington Br. 

R. R. 
Southeasterly 
Cambridge line Public. 



Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 
Private. 



35 

20 
40 

40 
55 
40 



1,060 
777 
345 

8,047 
1,985 

' 487 

'360 

510 

470 

2,304 

'466 
223 
244 
525 

*267 

'265 

'886 

695 

1,471 

377 

1,366 

1,690 



287 
377 
280 



584 

*600 

473 

590 

375 

1,214 

'190 
164 



1,423 
378 

6,938 
336 

2,530 



637 
'266 



1,260 



95 

sio 

255 

ioo 

250 

200 

iio 



190 
175 
280 



30 
200 
260 

764 



900 



100 
120 



200 



173 
68 



♦Proposed. 

ttState Highway Austin St. to Medford line. 

tState Highway. 

{Metropolitan Park Commission Boulevard. 



174 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



fable Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street From 



To 



N. Hampshire 

ave. 
Newman pi. 
Newton pL 
Newton 
Newton 
Norfolk 
North 

North 

North Union 
Norton 
Norwood ave. 

Oak Circle 

Oak 

Oak 

Oak St. pL 

Oak ter. 

Oakland ave. 

Olive ave. 

Olive sq. 

Oliver 

Orchard 

Osgood 

Ossipee road 

Otis 

Oxford 

Oxford 



Packard ave. 
Packard ave. 
Palmer ave. 
Park ave. 
Park pi. 
Park pi. 
Park 
Parkdale 
Parker pi. 
Parker 

Partridge ave. 
Patten ct. 
Paulina 
Pearl 
Pearl 
Pearl 
Pearl 

Pearl St. pi. 
Pearl ter. 
Pearson ave. 
Pearson road 
Pembroke ct. 
Pembroke 
Penn. ave. 
Penn. ave. 
Perkins pi. 
Perkins 
Perry- 
Peterson ter. 
Philips pi. 
Pinckney pi. 
Pinckney 
Piper ave. 
Pitman 
Pitman 
Pleasant ave. 
Poplar ct. 
Poplar 
Poplar 
Poplar 
Porter ave. 



Mystic ave. 
Cedar st. 
Newton st. 
Prospect st. 
Webster ave. 
Webster ave. 
Broadway 

Medford line 

b. 17 
Mystic ave. 
Nashua st. 
Broadway 

Cambridge line 
Prospect st. 
Angle 
Oak st. 
Elm st. 
Marshall st. 
Linden ave. 
Lake st. 
Franklin st. 
Cambridge line 
Granite st. 
Mason st. 
Cross st. 
School st. 
Beacon st. 



Penn. ave. 
Southeasterly 
Easterly 
Webster ave. 
Concord sq. 
Cambridge line 
Medford line 

b. 17 
Medford line 

b. 18 
Northeasterly 
Southeasterly 
Medford st. 



Public 

or 
Private 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



40 406 

15 

about 10 .... 
25 470 

40+ 637 
40 283 



40 



Public 37 to 42 
Private. 30 
Private. 20 
Public. 40 



1,961 
649 



350 



Northerly Private. 

Angle Public. 

Cambridge line Public. 
Northerly Private. 

Northeasterly Private. 
School st. Public. 

Peterson ter. Private. 
Southerly Private. 

Cross st. Public. 

Meacham road Public. 
E'ly & w'ly Private. 
Curtis st. Public. 

Wigglesworth BtPublic. 
Central st. Public. 

Cambridge line Public. 



Broadway 
Professors row 
Franklin st. 
College ave. 
Laurel st. 
Park pi. 
Somerville ave. 
Washington st. 
Porter st. 
"Washington st. 
Vernon st. 
Cutter st. 
Broadway 
Crescent st. 
Mt. Vernon st. 
Franklin st. 
Cross st. 
Pearl st. 
Pearl st. 
Morrison ave. 
Broadway 
Pembroke st. 
Central st. 
Broadway 
Wisconsin ave. 
Perkins st. 
Franklin st. 
"Washington st. 
Porter st. 
Spring st. 
Pinckney st. 
Washington st. 
Cedar st. 
Beech st. 
Spring st. 
Walnut st. 
Poplar st. 
Somerville ave. 
Linwood st. 
Joy st. 
Porter st. 



Professors row 
Medford line 
Northwesterly 
Wallace st. 
Easterly 
Northeasterly 
Beacon st. 
Lewis st. 
Northwesterly 
Fremont ave. 
Broadway 
Southeasterly 
Holland st. 
Mt. Vernon st. 
Franklin st. 
Cross st. 
Medford st. 
Northeasterly 
Northerly 
Boston ave. 
Dearborn road 
Southwesterly 
Sycamore st. 
Wisconsin ave. 
Cross st. 
Northeasterly 
Charlest'n line 
Lincoln pkway 
Olive ave. 
Westerly 
Southeasterly 
Perkins st. 
Westerly 
Spring st. 
Belmont st. 
Vinal ave. 
Southeasterly 
Linwood st. 
Joy st. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Northwesterly 



Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 



30 
40 
30 
4 
10+ 
40 
25 
about 15 

40 1,085 



665 
563 



440 



40 
40 
40 
40 
35 
50 

60 
60 
20 
40 
30 
20 
50 
40 
20 
35 
40 
8 
40 
37 
50 
40 
50 
20 
23 
45 
40 
25 
40 
50 
40 
20 
40 
40 
7.5 
15 + 
24 
40 
20 
30 
26 
40 
10 
30 
35 
35 
20 



1,567 

l',375 

1,200 

1,361 

100 

1,758 



467 



1,238 



203 
1,467 

'769 

341 

957 

1,060 

2,*47 

166 

1,320 
1,713 

'430 

1.112 

350 

1,336 
606 



1,186 

377 

'543 

*35i 
315 



100 
100 



600 
200 



35 



85 
90 

166 

100 



450 



240 

200 

622 
120 

600 
150 



100 

"iei 

130 

'266 

165 
100 
125 

*9i 

390 

'80 



65 

220 



CITY ENGINEER. 



175 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street From 

Porter Elm st. 

Porter Mountain ave. 

Powder house Powder house 

boulevard square 

Pow. house ter. Kidder ave. 
Prentiss Beacon St. 

Prescott Summer st. 

Preston road School st. 
Prichard ave. Morrison ave. 
Princeton Alpine st. 

Princeton Lowell st. 

Professors row College ave. 
Proposed Fellsway 

Proposed Fellsway 

Proposed Fellsway 

Prospect Washington st. 

Prosp't Hill av. Medford st. 
Prosp't Hill pkyMunroe st. 
Prospect pi. Prospect st. 

Putnam Summer st. 



To 

Mountain ave. 
Highland ave. 
Alewife Brook 

Parkway 
Liberty ave. 
Cambridge line 
Highland ave. 
Summer st. 
Boston ave. 
Lowell st. 
Centre st. 
Curtis st. 
Middlesex ave. 
Middlesex ave. 
Middlesex ave. 
Cambridge line 
Munroe st. 
Stone ave. 
Newton st. 
Highland ave. 



Quincy 

Radcliffe road 
Radcliffe road 
Randolph pi. 
Raymond ave. 
Record ct. 
Reed's ct. 
Remick ct. 
Rhode Is. ave. 
Richardson 
Richardson ter. 
Richdale ave. 
Roberts 
Robinson 
Rogers ave. 
Roland 
Rose 
Roseland 
Rossmore 
Royce pi. 
Rush 
Russell rd. 

Russell rd. 

Russell 

Sacrament© 
Sacramento 
Sacramento 
Sanborn ave. 
Sanborn ct. 
Sargent ave. 
Sartwell ave. 
Sawyer ave. 
School 
School 
Sellon pi. 
Seven Pines av. 
Sewall ct. 
Sewall 
Shawmut 
Shedd 

Sherman ct. 
Sibley ct. 
Sibley pi. 
Simpson ave. 
Skehan 
Skehan 
Skilton ave. 
Smith ave. 



Somerville ave. Summer st. 



Walnut st. 
Bradley st. 
Cross st. 
Curtis st. 
Broadway 
Oliver st. 
Cutter st. 
Mystic ave. 
Lowell st. 
Richardson st. 
School st. 
Hinckley st. 
Central st. 
Morrison ave. 
Waverly st. 
Washington st. 
Beacon st. 
Somerville ave, 
Bonair st. 
Broadway 
Broadway 

N. Line Ham- 
ilton rd. 
Elm st. 

Somerville ave, 
Fitchburg R. R 
Beacon st. 
Warren ave. 
Washington st. 
Broadway 
Cedar st. 
Packard ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Highland ave. 
Marshall st. 
Cameron ave. 
Sewall st. 
Grant st. 
Washington st. 
Somerville ave. 
Sargent ave. 
Cutter st. 
Cutter st. 
Broadway 
Dane st. 
Hanson 

Pearl st. around 
Beacon st. 



Bradley st. 
Marshall st. 
Westerly 
North st. 
Southwesterly 
Southwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Penn. ave. 
Hinckley st. 
Northeasterly 
Sycamore st. 
Northwesterly 
Bartlett St. 
Boston ave. 
Boston line 
Lewis st. 
Cambridge line 
Washington st. 
Northeasterly 
Flint st. 
N. line Hamil- 
ton rd. 



Public 

or 
Private 
Public. 
Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



Northerly Private. 

Cambridge line Public. 



Fitchburg R. R. 
Beacon st. 
Cambridge line 
Walnut st. 
Northwesterly 
Walnut st. 
Cherry st. 
Curtis st. 
Highland ave. 
Broadway 
Northwesterly 
Cambridge line 
Southwesterly 
Temple st. 
Cross st. 
Merriam ave. 
Marshall st. 
Northwesterly 
Northwesterly 
Holland st. 
Hanson st. 
Durham 
to< Pearl st. 
Line st. 



Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 



45 
40 

80 
40 
35 
50 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
50 
40 
40 
20 
50 

40 

35 

40 

15 

40 

10 

20 

10 

40 

35 

20 

40 

20 

40 

45 

40 

40 

40 

40 

15+ 

40 

40 

40 
40 

40 
40 
40 
40 
30 
40 
35 
40 
40 
50 
12 
40 
25 
40 
40 
40 
10 
10 
10 
40 
30 
30 
40 
25-f 



1,622 
415 

4,560 
585 

l.iio 

839 

1,191 

648 

2, 000 



2,071 
597 
400 

1,262 

781 

392 
261 



345 



460 
467 

'875 

*582 
1,682 

*450 
121 
534 

1,466 
559 



700 

80 
290 
154 
280 

1*075 
427 

l',90i 
2,500 

"92 

"615 

575 



1,018 
306 



150 



540 

195 
315 
340 



130 



244 

iio 

71 
100 



135 

iio 
ioo 

i75 
75 

176 
690 

i90 



310 
250 
100 
100 



414 
540 
200 



176 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 









Public 


Width 


Length 


Street 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private 


Feet Public Private 


Snow ter. 


Jaques st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


16 


• • • • 


110 


Somerville ave. 


E. Camb. line. 


Union sq. 


Public. 


75 


4,325 


• • • • 


Somerville ave. 


Union sq. 


N. Camb. line 


Public. 


70 


6,793 


• • • • 


South 


Medford st. 


Water st. 


Public. 


30 


989 


• • • • 


Spencer ave. 


Cedar st. 


Hancock st. 


Public. 


40 


727 


• • • • 


Spring cL 


Somerville ave 


. Westerly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


200 


Spring 


Somerville ave 


. Summer st. 


Public. 


40 


1,220 


• • • . 


Springfield 


Concord ave. 


Cambridge line Public. 


40 


788 


• • • • 


Spring Hill ter 


Highland ave. 


Belmont st. 


Public. 


20 


673 


.... 


Stanford ter. 


Beacon st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


200 


Steeves circle 


Cherry st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


15 


.... 


120 


•Sterling st. 


North st. 


Pow. House Bd.Private. 


40 


.... 


800 


Stickney ave. 


Marshall st. 


School st. 


Public. 


40 


458 


.... 


St. James ave 


Elm st. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


40 


488 


• . • • 


St. James ave. 

ext. 
Stone ave. 


Summer st. 


Northeasterly 


Public. 


30 


125 


.... 


Union sq. 


Columbus ave. 


Public. 


40 


676 


.... 


Stone ave. 


Columbus ave. 


Prosp't Hill py 


. Public. 


38 


107 


.... 


Stone pi. 


Stone ave. 


Southeasterly 


Public. 


30 


142 


.... 


Strathmore rd. 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Private. 


40 


.... 


16 


Summer 


Bow st. 


Elm st. 


Public. 


45 


7,900 


.... 


Summit ave. 


Walnut st. 


Vinal ave. 


Public. 


45 


532 


.... 


Summit 


College ave. 


Billingham st. 


Public. 


40 


262 


.... 


Sunnyside ave 


. Walnut st. 


Wigglesworth stPublic. 


25 to 3E 


• 306 


.... 


Sunset rd. 


Curtis st. 


Hillsdale road 


Private. 


40 


.... 


658 


Sycamore 


Broadway 


Medford st. 


Public. 


45 


1,275 


. . • ■ 


Sycamore 


Medford st. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Public. 


40 


667 


.... 


Sycamore 


B. & L. R. R. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


35 


722 


.... 


Sydney 


Grant st. 


Temple st. 


Public. 


40 


679 





Talbot ave. 


Packard ave. 


College ave. 


Private. 


50 




1,409 


♦Tannery Ex. 


Cambridge line Woodstock st. 














(Ext'n) 


Private. 


40 


.... 


160 


Taunton 


Wyatt. st. 


East'y to angle Private. 


30 


.... 


170 


Taunton 


Angle 


Marion st. 


Private. 


20 


.... 


95 


Taylor pi. 


Somerville ave 


. Southerly 


Private. 


15 


.... 


200 


Taylor 


Mystic ave. 


Sydney st. 


Public. 


40 


309 


.... 


Teele ave. 


Packard ave. 


Curtis st. 


Public. 


40 


685 


.... 


Temple 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


66 


1,637 


.... 


Tenney ct. 


Mystic ave. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


30 


.... 


400 


Tennyson 


Forster st. 


Pembroke st. 


Public. 


40 


922 


.... 


Thorndike 


Holland st. 


Arlington Br. 










Thorndike 


Arlington Br. 


R. R. 


Public. 


40 


465 


.... 




R. R. 


Kingston st 


Public. 


40 


115 


.... 


Thorpe 


Highland ave. 


Southwesterly 


Public. 


30 


468 


.... 


Thurston 


Broadway 


Richdale ave. 


Public. 


40 


1,660 


.... 


Timmins pi. 


Dane st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


3.5 


.... 


97 


Tower ct. 


Tyler st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


25 


.... 


150 


Tower 


Crown st. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


40 


559 


.... 


Tremont pi. 


Tremont st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


about 1C 


) 


75 


Tremont 


Webster ave. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


589 


.... 


Trull 


Vernon st. 


Medford st. 


Public. 


40 


1,050 


.... 


Trull lane 


Highland ave. 


Oxford st. 


Private. 


15 


.... 


200 


Tufts parkway College ave. 


College ave. 


Public. 


22 


900 


.... 


Tufts 


Washington st 


Cross st. 


Public. 


40 


982 


.... 


Turner ct. 


Franklin st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


150 


Tyler 


Vine st. 


Dane st. 


Public. 


40 


404 





Union 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


40 


345 




Union pi. 


Linwood st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


10 


.... 


100 


Upland Park 


Main st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


175 


Upland road 


Curtis st. 


Hillsdale road 


Private. 


40 





655 


Vermont ave. 


Mystic ave. 


Penn. ave. 


Public. 


40 


433 




Vernon 


Central st. 


Glenwood road 


Public. 


40 


764 


.... 


Vernon 


Glenwood road 


Partridge ave. 


Public. 


40 to 30 


190 


.... 


Vernon 


Partridge ave. 


Lowell st. 


Public. 


30 


434 


.... 


Victoria 


Broadway 


Cambridge line Public. 


40 


1,036 


.... 


Villa ave. 


Winslow ave. 


Arlington Br. 














R. R. 


Private. 


35 


.... 


200 


Village 


Dane st. 


Vine st. 


Private. 


25 


.... 


370 


♦Proposed. 















CITY ENGINEER. 



177 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 









Public 


Width 


i Length 


Street 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private 


Feet Public Private- 


Vinal ave. 


Summer st. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


45 


1,425 




Vinal 


Richardson 


st. Northeasterly 


Private. 


20 


• • • • 


20C 


Vine ct. 


Vine st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


25 


• • . • 


140 


Vine 


Somerville I 


fcve. Fitchburg R. 


R.Public. 


40 


540 


r ■ • • 


Vine 


Fitchburg R 


. R. Hanson st. 


Private. 


40 


• • • • 


222 


Vine 


Hanson st. 


Beacon st. 


Public. 


30 


662 


• • • • 


Virginia 


Aldrich st. 


Jasper st. 


Public. 


40 


405 





Wade ct. 


Cedar st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


20 




180 


Waldo ave. 


Beacon st. 


Dimick st. 


Public. 


40 


'277 


.... 


Waldo 


Highland ave. Hudson st. 


Public. 


40 


287 


.... 


Walker 


Broadway 


Leonard st. 


Public. 


40 


713 


. . . .- 


Wallace 


Holland st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


1,342 


. • • .- 


Walnut 


Bow st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


3,948 


«... 


Walnut road 


Walnut St. 


Kenneson road Public. 


40 


270 




Walter terrace Walter st. 


Southwesterly 


Public. 


40 


222 




Walter 


Walnut st. 


about 100 ft N. 












of Bradley st. Public. 


40 


548 




Ward 


Medford st. 


Harding st. 


Public. 


30 


433 


.... 


Ware 


Curtis st. 


Russell rd. 


Public. 


40 


749 




Warner 


Pow. House 


sq. Medford line 


Public. 


60 


500 




Warren ave. 


Union sq. 


Columbus ave. 


Public. 


40 


663 




Warren 


Medford st. 


Cambridge line Public. 


30 to 40 109 




Warwick place Warwick st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


15 




150- 


Warwick 


Cedar st. 


Warwick pi. 


Public. 


40 


665 




Washington av. Washington 


st. Northerly 


Private. 


18 


• • • • 


350 


Washington pi. Washington 


st. Southerly 


Private. 


about 7.5 


114 


Washington 


Charlest'n line Franklin ave. 


Public. 


75 


1.060 




Washington 


Franklin ave 


!. Fitchburg R. R. Public. 


60 to 100 3.977 




Washington 


Fitchburg R. 


R. Cambridge line Public. 


60 


2,344 


.... 


Water 


South st. 


Northerly 


Public. 


25 


366 


...... 


Waterhouse 


Broadway 


Cambridge line Public. 


40 


987 




Watson 


Broadway 


Fairmount ave 


. Private. 


40 


.... 


236 


Waverly 


Washington 


st. Roland st. 


Private. 


35 




200 


Webster ave. 


Union sq. 


Cambridge line Public. 


49.5 


1,955 




Webster 


Franklin st. 


Cross st. 


Public. 


40 


1,034 




Wellington ave 


i. Walnut st. 


Montgomery av Public. 


40 


215 




Wellington ave 


. Montgomery ; 


av. Easterly 


Private. 


40 




"85- 


Wesley pk. 


Wesley sq. 


Northeasterly 


Public. 


40 


405 




Wesley 


Pearl st. 


Otis st. 


Public. 


40 


515 




West 


Hawthorne i 


st. Highland ave. 


Public. 


30 


192 




West 


Highland ave. Arlington Br. 














R. R. 


Private. 


30 




266 


West Adams 


Conwell ave. 


t Medford line 


Public. 


40 


710 




Westminster 


Broadway 


Electric ave. 


Public. 


40 


376 




Weston ave. 


Clarendon ave. Broadway 


Private. 


40 


.... 


525 


West Quincy 


Bailey st. 


Medford line 


Public. 


40 


*292 




Westwood road Central st. 


Benton road 


Public. 


40 


489 




Wheatland 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


40 


1,364 




Wheeler 


Pinckney st. 


Mt. Vernon st. 


Public. 


40 


269 




Whipple 


Highland av€ 


i. Arlington Br. 














R. R. 


Private. 


30 




318 


fWhite 


Elm st. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 




'307 




White St. pi. 


White st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


20 




'2661 


Whitfield road 


Packard ave. 


Curtis st. 


Public. 


40 


*687 




Whitman 


Mason st. 


Packard ave. 


Public 


40 


632 




Wigglesworth 


Pearl st. 


Bonair st. 


Public. 


40 


744 




William 


College ave. 


Chandler st. 


Public. 


40 


381 




William 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Private. 


50 




50 


Williams ct. 


Porter st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


30 




164 


Willoughby 


Central st. 


Sycamore st. 


Public. 


40 


'427 




Willow ave. 


Elm st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


50 


3,534 




Willow pi. 


Cambridge line South st. 


Public. 


25 


125 




Wilson ave. 


Broadway 


B. & L. R. R. 


Public. 


20 


307 




Wilton 


Lowell st. 


Hinckley st. 


Public. 


35 


470 




Winchester 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Private. 


40 




*65 


Windom 


Elm st. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


40 


'300 




Windsor road 


Willow ave. 


Hancock st. 


Public. 


40 


575 




Windsor 


Cambridge Line Northerly 


Public. 


40 


40 




Windsor 


End of above Fitchburg R. R. 


Public. 


27 


490 


.... 



tSidewalk in Somerville. 



178 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Concluded. 



Street 

Winslow ave. 
Winter 

Winter Hill cir. 
Winthrop ave. 
Wisconsin ave. 
Woodbine 
Woodbine Ex. 
♦Woods ave. 
Woodstock 
•Woodstock 

(Extension) 
Wyatt circle 
Wyatt 

~Torktown 
Yorktown 



From 



Public Width Length 
To or in 

Private Feet Public Private 



Clifton st. 
Holland st. 
Northeasterly- 
Middlesex ave. 
Penn. ave. 
Westerly- 
Lowell st. 
Pow. House Bd. 
Alewife brook 
Tannery st. 
(Ext'n.) 

Wyatt st. around to Wyatt st. 

Concord ave. Lincoln pkway 



College ave. 
College ave. 
Broadway 
Mystic ave. 
Broadway 
Centre St. 
End of above 
North st. 
Victoria st. 
Victoria st. 



Cambridge line 

N. E. line 
Malvern ave. 



N. E. line 
Malvern ave. 
Northerly 



Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 
Private. 
Public 



Public. 
Private. 



40 
30 
25 
40 
50 
30 
35 
40 
40 to 32 

40 

20 
40 



40 
40 



1,123 

402 



499 



403 



496 



294 



177 
583 

*46i 

212 

1,135 



920 
315 



100 



►Court 

•Court 

Court 

Court 

<Jourt 

Court 

Court 

Court 

Court 

Court 

Court 

•Court 

Court 

<Jourt 

Court 

■Court 

Court 

■Court 

Court 

Court 

Court 

Court 

Court 

Court 

Court 

Court 

Court 



Southeasterly 
Central st. 
Northeasterly- 
Northeasterly 
Southwesterly 
Southwesterly 



39 Adams st. 
Albion st. 

11 Albion st. 
21 Albion st. 
292 Broadway 
612 Broadway 
Buena Vista rd-Easterly 
Cambria st. Northerly 

12 Carlton st. Southeasterly 

112 Central st. Northwesterly 

113 Central st. Southeasterly 
227 Columbia sLNorthwesterly 
Conlon et. Windsor st. ex. 
36 Craigie st. Westerly 

59 Craigie st. Easterly 
58 Dane st. Easterly 

20 Dimick st. Southwesterly 
91 Franklin st. Westerly 
35 Lexington ave Northerly 
66 Lowell st. Westerly 
78 Lowell st. Westerly 
101 Medford st. Easterly 
Sacramento st. Southeasterly 
335 Somervilleav Northerly 
10 Stone ave. Northwesterly 
Windsor st. ex. E'ly and Wly 
Washington ave Franklin st. 
Total 



Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 



8 
12 

9 
10 
15 
20 
15 

9 
25 
10 
20 
10 
20 
25 

23.63 . 
10 

39.25 , 
12 
21 
25 
25 

8 

25 

15 
20 

20 

6 
459, 



284 



90 
216 
178 
100 

90 
188 
145 

59 

75 
168 
150 
117 
240 
126 
129 

70 
136 
171 

90 
101 
101 

75 

318 

■ 60 

113 

370 

95 
81,856 



♦Proposed. 



Public, 85.7622 miles [includes 1.406 miles of City Boulevard and Park 
Roadways, 2.331 miles of State Boulevard (Metropolitan Park Commission), 
and 1.596 miles State Highway]; private 15.1037. 

Total length of streets in the city, 100.8659 miles. 



CHIEF ENGINEER FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



179 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Somerville, Mass., January 22, 1923. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen, 

Gentlemen, — In compliance with the City Ordinance, I 
have the honor of submitting, for your information, the annual 
report of the fire department for the year ending December 
31, 1922: 

Alarms of Fire. 

Number of bell alarms 279 

Number of still alarms 652 

Total alarms 931 

Number in excess of 1921 82 

Value of buildings at risk $651,750 00 

Insurance on buildings 794,000 00 

Damage to buildings . 120,652 84 

Value of contents 728,686 67 

Insurance on contents 748,198 00 

Damage to contents 336,299 89 

Total value at risk 1,380,436 67 

Total insurance . 1,542,198 00 

Total damage 456,852 73 

Approximate per capita loss 4 80 



List of Probable Causes. 



Ammonia leak 




. . 








1 


Assault 




# , 








1 


Automatic . 












5 


Automobile 




. 








35 


Awning 




. . 








1 


Back draught 




. 








1 


Bonfire 




. . 








51 


Broken gaspipe 










5 


Brush and leaves 


, . 








6 


Careless electrician 


■ . . 








1 


Careless Painter 


. . 








3 


Careless Plumber 


. . 








2 


Careless Roofer 










1 


Careless smokers 










22 


Carelessness with candle 








6 


Carelessness with gas 








5 


Carelessness with matches 








13 


Cat in tree .... 








2 


Children playing with matches 








17 


Cigars, cigarettes and pipes . 








8 


Coke bin 








1 


Covering on steam pipe . 








2 


Defective heaters, chimneys, etc. 








40 


Dry room 








2 


Dump fires 




. 








103 



180 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Electric cars . . . 

Electric wires and appliances 

False alarms 

Fireworks .... 

Friction .... 

Frozen water front . 

Fumigating 

Garage .... 

Gasoline leaking 

Gasoline on street . 

Gas stove and range 

Gasoline tank explosion . 

Grass fire .... 

Grease in blower 

Heating oil on stove . 

Horse in pit 

Hot ashes in wooden receptacle 

Incendiary 

Jack-O-Lantern . 

Kettle of fat or meat 

Leaking illuminating gas 

Leaking kerosene 

Lightning . 

Lime . 

Liquor stills 

Mailing letter . 

Oil heaters, lamps and stoves 

Out of town 

Overflow of oil, fuel 

Overheated furnace and 

Paper lantern . 

Person locked out . 

Rags on stove ... 

Rekindle .... 

Removing paint from auto 

Rescue of man on roof . 

Rubbish in cellar and barrel 

Salamander 

Spark from chimney 

boiler . 

locomotive . 



stove 



Spark from 

Spark from 

Smoking in bed 

Spark on roof . 

Spark from open fireplace 

Sprinkler alarm 

Sweepings in register 

Smoke mistaken for fire . 

Spontaneous combustion . 

Second and Third Alarm . 

Tar barrel and kettle 

Test 

Thawing water pipe . 

Train wreck 

Wood and paper near stove 

Unknown .... 

Unnecessary 



14 

18 

35 
3 
1 
1 
2 
3 
2 
1 
4 
1 

87 
2 
1 
3 
6 

31 
1 

11 
5 
2 
1 
1 
3 
1 

13 

99 
2 

12 
2 
3 
1 
4 
2 
1 

18 
1 

13 
1 

13 
1 

14 
2 
5 
2 

24 

10 
7 
3 
3 
6 
1 
7 

10 

69 



931 



CHIEF ENGINEER FIRE DEPARTMENT. 18l 

jd O > O H ^ »=3 *i g cq ttf 



CD 

a 

% 





o o £ -. M p £ 'i 

5 ?. g^ 2 & B 5 s 
S • g B . 2 S cr • . . 



P« £L CD 



i— o 



o «o 

•^ OS o> ts» to 

OOOOOOOOtfk.^ 



to to I oooooooo^[Z -cjiigine i. 



ex I I « | | lllSS Enffine *■ 

co en 
, co oo 00 (-I 

IIS| £Sg££g Engine 4. 



CO 
OS CO 

CO mh«oio+-io>oi 
^moovoooocoo Engine 6. 



com§£ | gg£££ H <>se 3. 

h-» to «0 

©1 M O O H* 

ft w a o o do itk a __ 
wtoOtfiooooojMw Hose 5. 



I m©££ | §?S3 Hose 7. 
to 

£ | £S§§3gfcg Hose 8. 



^ I I £2| | ££2 ladder 1. 



I I 



oo 



« S I I 2 «, g Ladder 2. 



^ 



I »£«,£§ | ££<£ Ladder 3. 

CO C71 OS f-l jg 

g^gSggi^^^ Totals. 



182 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



3n iHmortam 



LEBARON EMERY 

Permanent 

Appointed December 22, 1897 

Died March 28, 1922 



ELMER C. SHIERE 

Permanent 

Appointed November 14, 1899 

Died November 30, 1922 



CHIEF ENGINEER FIRE DEPARTMENT. 183 

Manual Faroe. 

The manual force consists of one hundred and twelve 
(11.2) permanent men, during the year two men have been 
retired and placed upon the pension list and two have died; 
three men have been added from the eligible list of the Civil 
Service. The roster of the department is as follows : 

1 Chief Engineer. 

1 Deputy Chief. 

2 District Chiefs. 
7 Captains. 

1 Master Mechanic. 
10 Lieutenants. 

3 Enginemen. 

87 Permanent men. 



Apparatus. 

1 Second size, horse drawn, steam fire engine, 

1 Horse drawn, combination chemical and hose wagon, 

1 Tractor drawn, second size, steam fire engine, 

1 Motor driven, 900 gallon pumping engine and hose wagon, 

1 Motor driven, triple combination pumper and chemical engine, 

5 Motor driven, combination chemical and hose wagons, 

1 Motor driven, combination ladder truck and chemical, 

2 Motor driven, ladder trucks, 

1 Motor driven, supply and wrecking car, 

1 Automobile, Chief's car, 

1 Automobile, Deputy Chiefs car, 

1 Automobile, District Chief's car, 

1 Automobile, Master Mechanic's car, 

1 Horse drawn ladder truck, in reserve, 

1 Horse drawn, combination chemical and hose wagon, in reserve. 

Horses. 

Six horses are continued in the department being neces- 
sary for the operation of the apparatus in Engine 4 station; 
they are in very good condition, having been selected from the 
nineteen that were in service the previous year. 

Hose. 

The amount of serviceable hose is but 8,500 feet of two 
and one half inch double jacket rubber lined water hose and 
1,950 feet of three quarter inch chemical hose. There has 
been 3,000 feet of new two and one-half inch purchased and 
2,800 feet condemned, 1,100 feet of which was destroyed by 
acid while working at a fire at the Prison Point yard of the 
Boston & Maine R. R. There must be at least 2,000 feet of 
new hose purchased the coming year to maintain, any where 
near, the necessary amount. 



184 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Brief Resume. 

Two fires, one in the Medina Building in March and the 
other in the supply or stock building of the Boston Elevated 
Ry. in December, totalled $375,000, leaving but $75,000 to be 
distributed throughout the entire year classified, by months, 
as follows, — 

January $39,344 27 

February 4,844 30 

March 80,615 95 

April 7,095 00 

May 1,949 54 

June 17,536 34 

July 932 50 

August 950 00 

September 652 00 

October 3,430 00 

November 1,966 75 

December 297,536 09 

$456,852 73 

There have been twenty-six fires with an insurance loss in 
excess of $1,000. as follows, — 

January 6, 5 : 15 P. M. 128 Linwood Street, White truck 
owned by C. Bowen & Sons, damage $1,300. Cause, filling 
gasoline tank. 

January 8, 3 : 10 P. M. Box 119, 38 Pearl Street, dwelling 
owned and occupied by John H. Meaney, damage to building 
$1,003, to contents $100. Cause, going to clothes closet with 
lighted candle. 

January 25, 10 : 57 A. M. Box 47, 2-2a West Street, dwell- 
ing owned by John Pierce, occupied by Patrick McCarthy et 
al., damage to building $936.75; to contents $188.05. Cause, 
oil stove in bathroom. 

January 26, 6 : 20 P. M. Box 341, 9-11 Stickney Avenue, 
factory owned and occupied by Edward F. Kemp, damage to 
imilding $3,748, to contents $9,385. Cause, woodwork too near 
chimney. 

January 28, 9:54 P. M. Box 113, B & M. R. R. yard at 
Prison Point, 5 Passenger coaches, 1 baggage and 1 pay- 
master's car destroyed, damage $13,750. Cause, overheated 
stove in pay car. 

January 29, 12: 29 A. M. Box 225, OS Bow Street, Bacon 
Hall building owned by Herbert Jay, occupied by R. H. 
Missereau et als. damage to building $752, to contents $4,- 
510.75. Cause, unknown, started in rubbish in fruit store 
cellar. 



CHIEF ENGINEER FIRE DEPARTMENT. 185 

February 4, 2:07 P. M. Box 42, B. & M. R. R. freight 
yard off Kent Street, empty freight car belonging to N. & W. 
R. R. damage $1,100. Cause, set by boys. 

March 5, 12-44 A. M. Box 443, a general alarm was 
sounded for this lire, Medina Building 6-12 Davis Square 
owned by John Medina Estate, occupied by stores and apart- 
ments; Miss Catherine Perkins was suffocated at this fire; 
damage to building $34,371.30; to contents $27,061.09. Prob- 
able cause, careless smoker in basement. 

March 10, 7 : 37 P. M. Box 225, 332 Somerville Avenue, 
store and tenement owned by E. M. Gladstone ; occupant Wm. 
Mendelson, Jeweler, damage to building $50, to contents $1,- 
080. Spontaneous combustion. 

March 17, 7:25 A. M. Box 19, 13 Joy Street, dwelling 
owned by F. G. Articary and occupied by same, damage to 
building $1,249, to contents $500. Cause, spark on shingle 
roof. 

March 18, 8: 17 A.. M. Box 36, 140 Central Street, dwell- 
ing owned by Dr. Charles F. Maguire, occupants, Alex. F. 
Morgan and George Simpson, damage to building $1,704, to 
contents $1,194. Cause, children going to closet with match. 

March 24, 3 : 33 P. M. Box 114, a second alarm was 
sounded for this fire, 50-56 Joy Street, hay and coal sheds 
owned and occupied by Colbert Bros., damage to buildings 
$8,560, to contents $7,650. Cause, spark from a locomotive. 

April 6, 8:39 P. M. Box 24, 535 Winsor Street, wood 
sheds owned by Waitzkin Bros, occupant Barron Bros. 
bundle wood, damage to building $2,820, to contents $3,335. 
Cause, unknown. 

June 14, 3 : 06 A. M. Box 428, a second alarm was sounded 
for this fire, 29-31 Newberne Street, factory building 
owned by F. B. Horseman, occupants Griffin- Weene Bag Co. 
et als. damage to building $4,585, to contents $12,324.34. 
Cause unknown, sprinkler valves were closed. 

October 19, 2 : 52 A. M. Box 14, 50 Tufts Street, stable 
owned by D. Mulcahey, occupied by John Bergman, damage 
to building $650, to contents $1,000. Cause, liquor still caught 
fire. 

October 31, 9:31 P. M. Box 212, Boynton Yard, three 
freight cars of B. & M. R. R. damage $16,265. Cause, set by 
boys. 

December 2, 8:36 P. M. Box 46, 681-685 Somerville 
Avenue owned by J. E. Locatelli, occupied by Morris Saval et 
als. damage to building $2,300, to contents $2,000. Cause, 
carelessness with matches. 

December 6, 11 : 14 A. M. Box 43, 28 Forest Street, dwell- 
ing owned by Lenno Zammarchi, occupied by owner, damage 



186 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

to building $1,006, to contents $198. Cause, overheated fur- 
nace. 

December 6, 6 : 19 P. M. Box 443, 90 Dover Street, store 
owned by Parke Snow Corp. occupied by A. L. Gaudet, damage 
to building $449, to contents $1,786.65. Cause, carelessness 
with matches. ' 

December 10, 4 : 42 A. M. Box 156, in rear George Street, 
Charlestown, stock building owned by Boston Elevated Ry. 
a total loss, damage to building $11,900, to contents $250,000. 
Cause, unknown. 

December 11, 7:07 P. M. Box 27, 370 Somerville Avenue, 
Drug store owned and occupied by Charles S. Lombard, dam- 
age to building $856, to contents $1,642.74. Cause, gas plate 
too near woodwork. 

December 12, 10:27 A. M. Box 117, 78-84 Broadway, 
block of stores owned by J. I. Miller et als. occupied by J. T. 
Connor Co. et als. damage to buildings $2,435, to contents $4,- 
442.03. Cause, rubbish on top of furnace. 

December 14, 6 : 27 A. M. Box 114, 39 Poplar Street, 
dwelling and shed owned and occupied by Abram Greenberg, 
damage to building $1,086. to contents $316. Cause, un- 
known. 

December 15, 9 : 23 P. M. a general alarm was sounded 
from Box 42, 285 Beacon Street, coal and wood yard and 
buildings owned and occupied by J. P. O'Neil, damage to 
buildings $5,100, to contents $6,200. Cause, unknown. 

December 20, 2 : 30 A. M. Box 21, 4b South Street, store 
and tenements owned by A. S. Scotti, occupants Nic Cremaldi 
et als, damage to building $904, to contents $300. Cause, 
cigarette thrown under counter. 

December 31, 1 1 :14 P. M. Box 427, a second alarm was 
sounded for this fire, stable and shed owned and occupied by 
Gilman Express Co., John E. Palmer Prop, damage to build- 
ing $2,000, to contents $4,900. Nineteen horses were killed 
at this fire. Cause unknown. 

Dump fires. This class of alarms amounts to practically 
one-sixth of the total alarms of the year and has required the 
services of one or more pieces of apparatus for hundreds of 
hours, thereby taking them from the stations and positions 
assigned them for the extinguishment of legitimate fires and 
uncovering their respective districts to an unnecessary and 
dangerous extent. An ordinance, of a restrictive character, 
should be made to reduce this hazard. 

Defective heaters, chimneys and smoke pipes. Owing to 
the shortage of coal and the use of many makeshifts for fuel, 
the conditions of heaters and chimneys will rapidly become a 
source of grave danger, every owner and tenant of shop and 



CHIEF ENGINEER FIRE DEPARTMENT. 187 

home should give his personal attention to inspecting and 
keeping clear and clean boiler tubes, smoke pipes and chim- 
neys thereby materially reducing this class of causes of fire, 
inasmuch as a chimney fire being centrally located in a build- 
ing makes a disagreeable, dirty and dangerous fire and results 
in a considerable loss to building and especially to contents. 

False alarms and bonfires. I should be delinquent in my 
duties if I failed to mention this class of alarms, each year I 
have called attention to their great number and the attendant 
danger and expense, during the past year there have been 
several cases, in the Police Court, of persons sounding false 
alarms and in some instances a punishment has been imposed; 
I strongly urge continued and greater efforts towards investi- 
gation and prosecution of this class of criminals, that this 
unnecessary abuse of apparatus and equipment be reduced. 

Recommendations. 

I again recommend the discontinuance of the present 
Engine No. 4 Station, at the corner of Grove Street and High- 
land Avenue, and the erection of an up-to-date station for the 
housing of the motor equipment necessary to make this station 
effective; the horse-drawn apparatus consisting of a steam 
fire engine and a horse-drawn combination chemical and hose 
wagon should be replaced with a motor pumping engine and 
a motor double tank combination chemical and hose car; the 
efficiency of such an equipment is unquestioned and the ex- 
pense of operation will be 85% less than the horse-drawn, 
comparison being made with like equipment at Engine No. 2 
Station, Engine 2 and Hose 8 requiring f 202.82 for gasoline 
and oil as against $1,440.02 for feed, shoeing, harness repairs 
and veterinary service at Engine No. 4 Station. 

A new car for the. use of the District Chief should be 
provided to replace a ten year old roadster that was purchased 
second-hand seven years ago. 

In Conclusion. 

In concluding my report I wish to thank His Honor the 
Mayor and the Board of Aldermen for their confidence and 
consideration; to the officers and members of the department 
commendation is due for their zeal and success in the per- 
formance of their duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sewall M. Rich, 

Chief Engineer. 



188 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF SANITARY DEPARTMENT 



March 3, 1923. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville. 

Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to submit to you the report of the 
Sanitary Department for the year 1922. 



Collection of Ashes and Paper. 

Ashes Paper 
(Cubic Tarda) (Cubic Tarda) 

January . . . . . 12,760 3,760 

February 10,270 3,420 

March 13,755 3,520 

April ...... 9,780 3,310 

May 9,150 3,850 

June 8,000 5,100 

July 7,350 4,800 

August 5,890 4,100 

September 5,970 3,700 

October 6,688 4,010 

November 8,510 3,680 

December 11,790 3,980 

Totals 109,913 47,230 

Departmental Revenue. 

Sale of Garbage $2,853 45 

Manure 20 

Horses, dump carts, offal wagons, etc. . . . 3,739 79 



$6,343 24 



During the year the Sanitary Department paid to the 
Highway Department $4,197.30 for the use of teams and 
1828.00 for board of horses. 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 189 

Commencing June 12, 1922 the garbage has been col- 
lected by a contractor, the contract price being $33,000 per 
year for five years with a yearly increase of $300. 

The paper and combustible materials are being disposed 
of at the incinerator plant. Ashes are collected principally 
by automobile trucks, deemed necessary as there are no nearby 
dumps. There is no public dump within the city limits and 
those now used by this department are located in the city of 
Medford and are subject to the rules and regulations of the 
Medford Board of Health. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Edgar T. Mayhew, 
8upt. of Sanitary Department. 



190 



ANNUAL REPORTS, 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



City Hall, Somerville, January 1, 1928. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville: — 

Gentlemen — 

In accordance with the provisions of the City Charter, 
I submit herewith the annual report of the public buildings 
department for the year ending December 31, 1922. 

The total valuation of the property which is in the 
custody of the public buildings department is approximately 
13,591,206. ' 

The total expenditures for the year 1922 for the care 
and maintenance of this property was $232,089.59. 

This amount was expended as follows : 



Janitors Fuel 

School Buildings . . $58,242 59 $39,877 15 

Municipal Buildings 5,170 97 1,629 13 

Polling Places . . 1 40 

Police Buildings . . 1,961 19 1,177 38 

Fire Buildings.. . . ., 4,809 86 

Electrical Dept. Bldg. 880 00 208 12 

Contagious Hospital 416 00 1,599 78 

Sewer Buildings . 44 00 

Sanitary Buildings . 88 20 

Highway Buildings , 703 42 

City Home Buildings 1,933 99 

Central Library . 3,068 CO 1,169 08 

West Branch Library 1,408 00 519 31 

East Branch Library 1,101 00 155 38 

Union Sq. Br. Library 1,122 48 445 52 

Park Buildings . . 378 00 175 50 

Bathhouse .... 1,025 09 

Bandstand .... 

Water Buildings . ...; 811 70 





Care and 




Light 


Repairs 


Totals 


$10,077 77 


$59,497 50 


$167,695 01 


1,527 05 


3,254 95 


11,582 10 


28 66 


679 12 


709 08 


718 97 


2,500 51 


6,358 05 


3,110 06 


7,776 62 


15,696 54 


139 68 


159 86 


1,387 66 


420 88 


1,011 20 


3,447 86 


49 13 


489 18 


582 31 


187 96 


370 30 


646 46 


221 57 


899 06 


1,824 05 


694 37 


1,686 14 


4,314 50 


1,167 88 


547 08 


5,952 04 


397 81 


142 97 


2,468 09 


205 07 


53 15 


1,514 60 


290 43 


264 05 


2,122 48 


551 29 


414 77 


1,519 56 




1,506 40 


2,531 49 




412 87 
194 30 


412 87 


318 84 


1,324 84 



$74,773 32 $55,348 92 $20,107 32 $81,860 03 $232,089 59 



Inspection of Buildings. 

The Commissioner of Public Buildings is also the in- 
spector of buildings according to the terms of the charter 
and as such during the past year has made 2688 formal in- 
spections of buildings in the process of construction. 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



191 



The following table shows the number of permits issued 
for building operations during the year 1922 : — 



Buildings 

Dwellings 
Stores 

Dwellings & Stores 
Garages 
Storage 

Manufactories . 
Sheds 
Offices 
Stables 
Shops 

Churches . 
Bakery 
Halls 

Gasoline Stations 
Greenhouse 
Chemical Laboratory- 
Creameries 
Theatres . 
Stores and Offices 
Warehouse 
Miscellaneous . 

Totals 



WARDS 
4 5 



38 
10 
2 
42 
7 
1 
6 
3 
2 
3 



49 
4 
2 

32 

7 

7 
6 

2 



25 
5 
2 

36 
1 



25 
3 

2 
38 
7 
2 
2 

3 
3 
2 
1 
1 
2 



45 

7 

1 

44 

1 



6 

49 
6 
3 

65 
3 



7 Totals 



189 
9 
3 

154 
4 



420 

44 

15 

411 

30 

10 

21 

5 

10 

14 

2 

2 

2 

6 

1 

1 

5 

2 

2 

3 

7 



120 113 



73 



94 103 132 378 1013 







Wood 


Fire -resisting 


i 


Totals 


New buildings 






226 




441 






667 


Alterations 






296 




27 






323 


Totals 






522 




468 






990 


23 buildings torn down 


























WARDS 








Buildings 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


Totals 


Wood 


61 


70 


30 


41 


48 


58 


210 


518 


Wood and Cement . 


• ••• 


• ••> 


• •'•• 


• ••• 


1 


4 


7 


12 


Wood and Concrete 


1 


• ••• 




1 


1 


.... 


3 


6 


Fireproofed wood . 


1 


4 


4 


3 


«... 


1 


2 


15 


Brick 


4 


5 


4 


6 


2 


8 


10 


39 


Brick and wood 


3 


2 


.... 


1 


1 


1 


• **« 


8 


Brick and Concrete 


5 


4 


• •>• 


2 


3 


3 


7 


24 


Cement block . 


25 


15 


29 


26 


27 


45 


118 


285 


Concrete . 


19 


7 


2 


12 


6 


6 


17 


69 


Steel 


1 


6 


4 


2 


10 


5 


3 


31 


Wood and glass 






«••• 


.... 


.... 


1 


.... 


1 


Stucco 




.... 


.... 


• ••• 




.... 


i 


1 


Wood and Stucco . 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


4 


.... 




4 


Totals 


120 


113 


73 


94 


103 


132 


378 


1013 



192 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The number of plumbing permits issued during 1922, was. . 415 

Number of permits for plumbing in new buildings . . . 223 

Number of permits for plumbing in old buildings . . . 192 

Number of buildings in which soil pipes were tested . . . 341 

The total estimated cost of new buildings and altera- 
tions during the year 1922 was $3,136,602, while the estimated 
cost in 1921 was $1,838,455, showing an increase of $1,298,- 
147. 

The total number of permits issued during the year 
1922, viz. 1013, was 299 more than during the year 1921, when 
714 permits for new buildings and alterations were issued, 
showing an increase of 41 per cent. 

There has been considerable speculative building of dwell- 
ings going on this year, or to be exact there were permits 
issued for 194 new buildings housing 401 families. 

Single family houses have been altered into two family 
houses and some of the larger houses have been altered into 
small kitchenette suites. These types of alteration demand 
very careful inspection and supervision by this department 
and entail considerable more time than new construction. . 

On September 1, 1918, the Board of Aldermen of the City 
of Somerville passed an ordinance requiring a fee to be col- 
lected for every building permit issued by this department. 
In accordance with this, fees collected for building permits 
during the year 1922 amounted to $2618. 

The Commissioner has under his charge and direction 
the work of maintenance and upkeep of the eighty-four public 
buildings of the city and the grounds in connection therewith, 
all janitors in the city's employ, a force of eleven mechanics 
who perform most of the work of keeping the buildings in 
repair, the inspection of installation and care of all elevators, 
the supervision of construction of all new municipal build- 
ings, the maintenance of the public bathing beach, and public 
municipal baths in the Bennett, and Bingham Schools, and 
Lincoln Park. 

The various activities in connection with the depart- 
ment work require a vast amount of time and attention in 
order to keep the property in proper condition for occupancy. 

Coal. 

As in the past years an invitation was sent out for bids 
for supplying the necessary tonnage of both Anthracite and 
Bituminous coal for the city buildings for the winter of 1922 
and the spring of 1923. 

Owing to mine troubles and railroad conditions, it was 
impossible to obtain bids for fuel this year. Lack of high 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 193 

grade soft and Anthracite coal in Boston markets made the 
situation look quite uncertain. However, the Commissioner 
succeeded in obtaining through several local Boston concerns 
a very high grade of New River soft coal at an exceedingly 
low price. 

There are, however, several plants where it is almost 
impossible to obtain any results from soft coal. It has been 
possible, however, to keep these plants supplied with Anthra- 
cite coal. 

Prices were higher for the same grade of coal than dur- 
ing 1921, owing to these troubles and lack of supply, but the 
mild weather during the year 1922 made the total cost of fuel 
$15,623.25 less than in 1921. 



Elevators. 

According to an act of the Legislature, the Building 
Commissioner is required to have every elevator in the city 
inspected yearly, and a report of the conditions and necessary 
repairs made to the State District Police. 

Plans and specifications of all new installations of ele- 
vators must be filed in this office and certificates of approval 
granted by the Commissioner. 

During the year 1922, there were 144 elevators inspected 
and 36 orders for repairs to be made to 64 elevators, sent to 
the owners. 

Plans and specifications were filed and applications 
granted for the installation of 3 new elevators. 



School Buildings. 

The maintenance and care of the school buildings has, 
as formerly, demanded the most vigilant attention from this 
department and the appropriation made for that purpose has, 
I believe, been expended carefully and judiciously. 

Every year before the summer vacation arrives this de- 
partment sends out a blank to be filled in by both the princi- 
pals and janitors of the school buildings for all requisitions 
and repairs needed. 

These repairs and requests are taken up with the Super- 
intendent of Schools, and taken care of in the order which he 
suggests so far as the appropriation will allow. 

First are taken- into consideration the requests and re- 
pairs absolutely needed for the opening of schools in the Fall. 
Then the others are taken up in the order of their importance. 



194 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

This in itself is a huge task as the wants of every section 
must be taken into consideration. 

Among the necessary repairs taken care of this past year 
are the following: 

Five boilers were retubed. A number of grates were installed 
and repairs made on 16 other boilers. 

Plaster repairs were made in 13 buildings. 

Plumbing repairs and new installations were made in 14 build- 
ings. 

New water service with larger main installed in Brown School. 

CARPENTER WORK: 

It is with great pleasure that the Commissioner can re- 
port many much needed repairs in all the school buildings 
during the past summer vacation. Much of this work was 
accomplished with our own carpenters and a great deal by 
outside contractors. These repairs consist in general of the 
following : 

Installing window sashes 

Replacing window cords 

Repairing and tightening furniture 

Replacing worn stair treads 

Erecting fences 

Extensive alterations and changes in several buildings. 

At the High School, room 301 has been fitted with raised 
platforms for seats, a new silver screen erected and electric 
attachments run for a new stereopticon lantern, new folding- 
chairs installed, thus making a complete assembly room for 
stereoptican purposes. 

At the Boys' Vocational School on Tufts Street, the wall r 
of the Machine Shop have been fitted with plaster board and 
sheathed with hard pine, tinted and varnised, a new type 
of lighting fixtures installed and new curtains fitted to the 
windows. This work has added greatly to the warmth of 
the building and gives a more comfortable and lighter shop 
for the pupils. 

PAINTING. 

It was possible this year to have several buildings painted 
both on the interior and exterior, and the Commissioner hopes 
this coming summer to extend this work. Special attention 
has been given to the selection of tints for the interior work in 
order that the best lighting effects might be obtained in order 
to relieve any possible eye strain. 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 195 

Early in the summer invitations were issued to several 
master painters to submit estimates for interior painting at 
the Carr, Lowe, Lincoln, Burns, Durell, Forster, Glines, 
Edgerly, High and Baxter School buildings. There were 
eight bids received and the awards were made as follows : 

William Stern Lincoln 

John Lingard Burns, Glines and Edgerly 

August Johnson & Co Forster, High and Baxter 

Walter J. Godfrey Carr, Lowe and Durrell 

The interior of the Cummings School was painted earlier 
in the year by F. M. Rogers & Co. at a cost of $497. 

In the same manner estimates were obtained for exteri- 
or painting at the Carr, Cummings, and Hodgkins School 
buildings, and awards were made as follows : 

William Stern Hodgkins 

F. M. Rogers & Co Cummings 

James L. Flynn Carr 

The cost of this painting was f 6955. 

On all school buildings the outside doors were repainted, 
all basements were whitewashed, all toilet seats painted with 
white enamel, and in several buildings the entire toilets were 
repainted. 

About 2500 desk tops and over 50 teachers' desks and 
tables were refinished and varnished. Over 2000 students' 
chairs were refinished and varnished. 

WINDOW SHADES. 

The shade problem is another big item in connection with 
the maintenance of buildings. During the past year in twenty- 
four of the buildings, over 300 new shades have been installed 
replacing torn or otherwise damaged ones. 

LIGHTING. 

At the request of the Superintendent of Schools and the 
Supervisor of Continuation Schools, a new system of in- 
direct lighting has been installed in the rooms at the High 
School used for the continuation classes for sewing purposes, 
which has met with great approval. 

At the Highland School additional lights have been in- 
stalled in the halls, office and toilets. 

The Lincoln School building has been wired throughout 
for electricity and new fixtures installed. 



196 ANNUAL RErORTS 

The Bell School building has been wired throughout and 
new fixtures installed. 

At the Boys' Trade School, the lights have been lowered 
and new shades installed to give better lighting effects. 

There have been several minor changes in the lighting 
system of other buildings which practically completes the 
electrical program for the year. 

As there are several of the older buildings in the city 
that are very much in need of adequate means of lighting, 
it is the hope of the Commissioner to continue this work dur- 
ing the coming summer and be able to report several other 
buildings completed in the next annual report. 

HEATING. 

Many necessary repairs have been made to the heating 
plants of several buildings during the past summer and there 
are still more repairs and changes which we desire to make 
in order that the plants may be more effective. 

At the Cummings School a new furnace was installed. 

At the Lincoln School the boiler was repaired and en- 
larged so that this year it has not been necessary to close 
school on account of cold rooms. Five boilers have been re- 
tubed and a number of grates installed together with repairs 
on sixteen other boilers. 

In fifteen buildings steam repairs have been made owing 
to leaky and defective pipes or fittings. 

The fire boxes and practically all boiler settings have 
been repaired or renewed. 

Fuel savers have been tried in several of the buildings 
with no marked success. 

BLACKBOAKDS. 

At the Cutler School, new slate blackboards and mould- 
ings were installed at a cost of §300. 

In thirteen of the older buildings where paper black- 
boards are still used, which have to be resurfaced practical- 
ly every year, repairs were made by the Baker School Special- 
ty Company of West Somerville, at a cost of 1606.62. 

EOOFS. 

Eighteen roof leaks were taken care of, several gutters 
and conductors replaced and other roof repairs made on 
several buildings. The ventilating hoods on top of vent 
stacks above the roofs on five buildings were repaired or 
replaced. 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 197 

There is a possibility during the coming year of the 
necessity for replacing the entire slate roof on at least two 
buildings and also one tar and gravel roof. 

SCHOOL YARDS. 

During the past summer extensive repairs have been 
made to the school yards. 

At the Bingham School, the grade of the yard has been 
raised by a fill thus preventing the water from overflowing 
on the adjoining property, resurfacing with an asphalt pave- 
ment and' cutting away the sidewalk making a cement drive 
to the coal bin windows, doing away with the necessity of 
carrying in the coal, which improvement will pay for itself 
in a short time. 

At the Brown School a new tar and macadam coal drive 
was made and the grade of the school yard was raised to pre- 
vent the surface water from flowing into the basement. 

At the Burns School the old tar concrete drive was re- 
placed with a tar and macadam to prevent the coal teams 
from cutting into same. 

At the Lowe School a retaining wall was erected and the 
pitch of the yard changed to prevent water from running 
over the neighbor's property and cutting away the* banking. 

At the Forster School a new tar and macadam driveway 
was constructed. 

At the Hanscom, Highland and Prescott Schools., the 
yards were recoated. 

The contract for the above work was awarded to James 
H. Fannon at a cost of $3072. 

FURNITURE. 

Owing to changes in some of the school buildings, it has 
been necessary to change several rooms of furniture during 
the past year. 

A number of new teachers' desks and chairs have been 
purchased and a great many new pupils' desks and chairs 
have been installed to replace damaged or worn out furni- 
ture. 

At the Boys' Trade School fifty new metal lockers have 
been installed filling a much needed want and doing away 
with the old wooden lockers which were a fire menace. 

FIRE ALARM. 

In four of the school buildings a new and distinct type 
of fire alarm has been installed, the current for same being 
taken direct from the Edison Electric current instead of from 



198 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

batteries. The buildings so equipped are the Highland, East- 
ern Junior High, Prescott and Lowe Schools. 

It is the hope of the Commissioner to be able to equip 
other school buildings in a similar manner this year. 

Fire Department Buildings. 

There have been numerous repairs and improvements 
made in the fire buildings of the city. 

The abolishing of Hose Eight Station on Marshall Street 
caused changes to be made in Hose Two Station at the cor- 
ner of Cross Street and Broadway, and the purchase of addi- 
tional furniture. 

The exterior of Engine Two, Ladder Two and the Cen- 
tral Fire Station buildings have been painted by our depart- 
ment painters. 

Interior painting has been done in Hose 5, Engine Two 
and the Central Fire Stations. 

At Engine Six Station, the sleeping quarters have been 
thoroughly renovated. The old hay loft has been fitted up 
for sleeping quarters which fills a most pressing need and 
now gives windows on three sides while the old quarters had 
windows on one side only. A new room has been fitted up 
in the front of the building for the District Chief, and the 
old bath renovated and a new shower installed. 

At Engine Two, new heating apparatus has been in- 
stalled. 

At the Central Fire Station, new piping for a cold water 
supply has been installed. 

New landing pads for sliding poles have been replaced in 
several of the stations. 

A new roof was put on the Central Fire Station, and all 
cornices repaired and replaced where necessary. 

New steel lockers have been purchased for several build- 
ings. 

New chairs have been purchased for the recreation rooms 
at Union Square, Engine Two and Ladder Two Stations, and 
new desk chairs for the floor men at Union Square, Ladder 
Two, Engine 6 and the Central Stations. 

The Commissioner recommends the following consider- 
ations for this coming year: 

Removal of the gas heaters used for heating water, and the 
installation of tanks connected with a coal heater, of sufficient capaci- 
ty for summer use, and connected with the heating plant for winter 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 199 

use. This would mean a great saving of gas, which is at present 
quite an expense. 

New cement floors in the apparatus rooms at Union Square, 
Engine Two, Ladder Two and Engine Six. 

Several minor repairs and some painting at Engine Four, al- 
though I urgently recommend that this building be replaced by a 
new one as it is in such bad shape that it does not seem wise to 
spend much on repairs. As a fire station is needed in this vicinity, 
I recommend that this station be torn down and a new one built 
on less valuable land, and this lot sold for commercial purposes. 
Much of the material in the old building could be made use of in a 
new one. 

Municipal Buildings. 

At the present time plans are being made for an addition 
to the present City Hall, the departments of which have been 
crowded for space for some time. From the plans shown an- 
other wing will be added to the present building and the 
entrance changed to the side, carrying out the style of archi- 
tecture of the original building. This will give sufficient 
room to house the departments some of which are at present 
in the Annex. 

During the past year the exterior walls of the G. A. R. 
section of City Hall Annex have been painted. 

The heating plant has been connected to the central heat- 
ing system, doing away with the use of the old boiler in the 
Annex, and thus effecting a considerable saving of fuel. 

New electric lighting fixtures have been installed in the 
offices of the Superintendent of Schools and the Overseers of 
Poor. 

Additional radiation has been installed and a new flag 
case completed and set up in G. A. R. Hall. 

Libraries. 

Very few repairs have been made to the library buildings 
this year. 

The interior of the Central and West Somerville Branch 
Libraries are in such a condition that they will need painting 
throughout in the near future. 

Some roof repairs will be necessary at the Central Li- 
brary after this past winter. 

Considerable furniture is needed this coming year. 

Water, Highway, Sanitary and Sewer Buildings. 
WATER BUILDINGS. 

Considerable work has been accomplished at these build- 
ings during the past year and there is need of still more. A 



200 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

concrete floor is needed in the shop and the windows need to 
be enlarged to give proper light. 

HIGHWAY BUILDINGS. 

A new tar and gravel roof has been laid on the garage 
and blacksmith shop, and an additional area of the shed en- 
closed for garage purposes. General repairs were made to 
the interior of the building. 

SANITARY BUILDINGS. 

The office at the Sanitary Stable has been painted on the 
interior and exterior and fltted with new furniture. A new 
tar and gravel roof must be put on this year, and extensive 
plumbing repairs made. 

SEWER BUILDINGS. 

The Sewer Building has been repaired generally, a new 
roof was laid, new floors in the shop and new sash. These 
repairs will eliminate spending money on this building for 
several years. 

Hospital. 

General repairs have been made to the hospital buildings. 
New stairs have been built extending to the hospital wards, 
and to both front and rear piazzas of the scarlet-fever ward. 

The chimneys have been pointed and a portion of the roof 
reshingled. There is still considerable work to be done in 
these buildings and it is hoped that it will be possible this 
coming year to do some interior and exterior painting. 

Police Buildings. 

Many needed repairs were made during the past year. 
Extensive interior painting was done including the offices and 
cell rooms. New lighting fixtures were installed in the outer 
office, guard room, clerk of court's and the court room. In 
the Judge's office a new metal ceiling was installed and the 
room repainted. 

A new counter was built in the room occupied by the 
Clerk of Court. 

Several steel lockers were installed to replace the old 
wooden ones. 

A new heating plant has been installed in the stable of 
adequate size to take care of the additional wooden garages. 

Bathhouse. 
The public bathhouse on the Mystic River at Wellington 
Bridge was opened and maintained as usual this year with a 
good attendance. 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 201 

About 500 tons of sand were purchased for resanding the 
beach. 

A change was made on the men's side of the bathhouse 
by installing separate showers and toilets for the boys' quar- 
ters, thus excluding the boys from the men's locker rooms 
which seems to be a much better arrangement. 

It is hoped that the same change may be made on the 
women's side of the building this coming summer. 

Park Buildings. 

The total amount expended on our Park Buildings dur- 
ing the year 1922 was $1520., and of this amount $1337. was 
spent for attendant, fuel and light, laundry and supplies, 
leaving a balance of only $183. as having been spent for ac- 
tual repairs. 

It will be necessary this year however, to spend consider- 
able on the hot water heater for the shower baths at Lincoln 
Park, as we are only able at present to supply hot water for 
three of the twelve showers. 

The wooden storage building in Broadway Park was re- 
moved during the year; this saved considerable expense for 
repairs. 

Bids have been received and the contract awarded to 
Mulcare and Graves of Cambridge for the erection of a new 
Park building in Richard Trum Playground at a cost of 
$5172. The plans for this building were made by the Commis- 
sioner of Buildings, and they provide comfort stations for 
men and women, storage space for the Park Department, all 
on the street level, while beneath on the playground level, 
there will be a large dressing room and shower baths for the 
athletes together with a heater room. It is expected that 
this building will be finished about the 15th of June. 

The Park building for Dilboy Field has not been started 
as 3^et owing to insufficient funds, but plans made by the 
Commissioner are on file in his office and it is expected that 
this contract will be awarded this year. 

In General. 

The Building Commissioner has had the co-operation of 
all branches of the City Government, including His Honor, 
the Mayor, the honorable members of the Board of Aldermen 
and all the city officials, and desires to thank them for their 
kindly consideration. 

Respectfully sumbitted, 

George L. JDudley, 
Commissioner of Public Buildings. 



202 ANNUAL REPORTS 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

ORGANIZATION — 1922 

Robert M. Lavender, Chairman 

resigned April 13, 1922 
C. A. C. Richardson, M. D., Chairman 
appointed April 13, 1922 
Warren C. Blair 
John E. Gillis, M. D. 
resigned April 13, 1922 
Wesley M. Goff 
appointed April 13, 1922 

Clerk and Agent to Issue Burial Permits 

Laurence S. Howard 

Assistant Clerk 

Olive M. Stanley 

Agent 

George i. Canfield 

Medical Inspector and Bacteriologist 
Frank L. Morse, M. D. 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions 

Charles M. Berry, V. S. 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar 
Herbert E. Bowman, Ph. G. 

Milk Collector 
William H. Wallis 

Plumbing Inspector 
Duncan C. Greene 

School Nurse 

Grace M. Andrews, R. N. ' 

Assistant School Nurse 
Gladys M. Grant, R. N. 

Health Nurses 

Helen B. Berry, R. N. Mary L. Scott, R. N. 

Grace E. Pickering, R. N. 

Matron at Contagious Hospital 

Lillian E. Gould, R. N. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 203 

Office of the Board of Health, 
City Hall Annex, January 1, 1923. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen: — 
Gentlemen : — 

We respectfully submit the following as the forty-fifth 
annual report of the Board of Health in which is presented 
a statement, tabulated and otherwise, of the sanitary condi- 
tion of the city and the business of the board for the year 
ending December 31, 1922. 

Nuisances 

A record of the nuisances abated during the year, in 

compliance with notices issued by the board, or under the 

board's direction, is presented in the following table: 
Complaints referred from 1921 .... 21 

Complaints received during 1922 .... 474 



495 
Complaints referred to 1923 25 



Nuisances abated in 1922 470 

Second and third notices sent .... 25 

Received during 1922 . . . . . 474 



Total notices sent . .... 499 

In addition to the above, 334 dead animals have been 
removed from the public streets and private premises. Many 
nuisances have been abated on verbal notice from the agent, 
without action by the board, of which no record has been 
made. Each spring the whole city is examined, and cellars, 
yards and alleyways where rubbish and filth have collected 
are required to be cleaned. 

Record of Licenses and Permits Issued 

COWS. One application was received for a permit to 
keep one cow, which was granted. 

GOATS. Eight applications were received for permits 
to keep twenty-one goats, all of which were granted. The 
fee is one dollar for each goat. 

HENS. Seventy-six applications for permits to keep 
1235 hens were received. Fifty-seven to keep nine hundred 
and ninety-seven hens were granted, and nineteen permits 
were refused. One license to keep six hens was revoked. 

GREASE. Twenty-one applications were received for 
permits for twenty-four teams to collect grease, which were 
granted. The fee is two dollars for each team. 



204 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

MELTING AND RENDERING. Three parties have 
been licensed to carry on "the business of melting and render- 
ing, for which a fee of one dollar is charged. One license to 
render under Section 154 of Chapter 111 of the General Laws 
was granted. 

MASSAGE AND MANICURE. Thirty-four persons 
have been licensed to practice massage and manicure. The 
fee is one dollar for each license. 

SALE OF ALCOHOL. The statutes provide that no 
person firm or corporation other than a registered druggist 
shall engage in the business of manufacturing, buying, sell- 
ing or dealing in methyl alcohol, or wood alcohol, so called 
or denatured alcohol, or any preparation containing more 
than three per cent of any of the said alcohols, without be- 
ing licensed so to do by the Board of Health. 

Under the provisions of this act fifteen licenses have 
been issued. A fee of one dollar was received for each 
license. 

BOTTLING. CARBONATED BEVERAGES. Chapter 
303, Acts of 1921 provides that no person shall engage in the 
manufacture or bottling of carbonated non-alcoholic bever- 
ages, soda waters and mineral and spring water without a 
permit from the board of health. Xine such permits were 
granted, a fee of ten dollars being charged in each case. 

DAT NZ^RSERY. One license was issued to establish 
and maintain a Day Nursery for which a fee of one dollar 
was charged. Application was made for the renewal of a 
license to maintain a nursery, which was not granted by the 
board of health. 

Stables 

Xo person has the legal right to erect, occupy or use 
any building in this city, as a stable, without obtaining a 
license from the board for such occupancy. Each applica- 
tion is referred to the Agent of this board and no license 
is granted unless all regulations of the board are complied 
with. The following is a record of applications received and 
licenses granted : 

Applications pending from 1921 . . 7 

Applications received during 1922 . . 11 



18 



Licenses granted ..... 9 

Licenses refused 2 



11 
Licenses pending .... 7 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 205 

Board of Infants 

Fourteen applications having been made to the State 
Department of Public Welfare for licenses to care for chil- 
dren in this city were referred to this Board under provisions 
of Chapter 119 of the General Laws. Thirteen of these ap- 
plications were approved for the care of twenty-six children 
and one was returned without the approval of this board. 

There were 1019 deaths and fifty-six stillbirths in the 
city during the year, as specified in the following table : 

Deaths at Somerville Hospital . . . . 96 

Deaths at hospital for contagious diseases . . 19 

Deaths at home for aged poor (Highland Avenue) 49 

Deaths at city home 9 

Deaths at other institutions 38 



206 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Mortality in Somerville in 1922 



Ph 













h 




u 












0} 




0) 












^3 




£> 


p. 

< 


>> 


0) 

Pi 




CO 

a 

3 


H 

P. 
03 

go 


01 

o 
o 

o 


g 

o 



I. Epidemic, Endemic and 
Infectious Diseases. 

1A Typhoid Fever 

7 Measles 

8 Scarlet Fever 

9 Whooping Cough 

10 Diphtheria 

11 Influenza 

21 Erysipelas 

22 Acute Poliomyelitis 

24 Epidemic Cerebro Spinal 

Meningitis 

31 Tuberculosis of the Respira- 

tory System 

32 Tubercular Meningitis 

38 Syphilis 



II. General Diseases not 
Included Above 

43 Cancer Buccal Cavity 

44 Cancer of Stomach & Liver 

45 Cancer of Intestines, etc 

46 Cancer of Female Genital 

Organs 

47 Cancer of breast.... 

48 Cancer of the Skin 

49 Cancer of other Organs 

52 Chronic Rheumatism 

57 Diabetes Mellitus 

58 A Pernicious Anaemia 

65A Leukemia 

69 Other General Diseases 



III. Diseases of the Nervous 

System and Organs of the 

Special Sense. 

70 Encephalitis 

71A Simple Meningitis 

72 Locomotor ataxia 

73 Other Diseases of the Spinal 

Cord 

74 Apoplexy 

75 Paralysis without specified 

cause 

75A Hemiplegia 

80 Infantile Convulsions 

84 Cretinisn 



IV. Diseases of the Circula- 
tory System. 

88 Endocarditis and Myocar- 

ditis (acute) 

89 Angina Pectoris 

90 Other Diseases of the Heart 

91 B Arterio Sclerosis 

92 Embolism and Thrombosis 
94 Diseases of the Lymphatic 

System 















1 


1 


1 


1 














2 










1 


















2 
8 

6 














1 
1 


3 


1 
1 


1 


2 
3 


1 


3 




1 












1 


1 






























1 


1 
5 






1 
1 
















4 


3 


1 


2 


5 
1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


3 


1 
5 
1 

1 
3 


1 






















1 
2 
1 


















1 
2 

2 


1 


3 
2 


4 
3 

2 
1 


4 
3 

1 


3 
1 


3 
1 


3 
1 


5 
1 


1 
4 

1 
1 






1 


1 


2 
1 

1 


1 








3 
3 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 


3 


3 










2 












1 
2 
1 






1 


1 


1 
1 


1 
1 




1 


1 


1 


4 


1 
















I 






1 


1 


- 


1 
1 


1 




















1 
1 








1 

1 

1 
4 


















14 
1 


1 
9 


3 

7 








1 
10 

1 


2 






9 


13 

1 


6 
1 


9 


5 


4 










1 
















1 


1 






1 
















1 

5 
...„. 

7 




2 
1 
12 
9 
1 


1 

2 

17 

20 

1 






9 

1 

9 

12 


1 

10 

13 

I 


2 

14 
12 


6 

"'V 

11 


7 
1 
11 
8 
1 


10 
4 
8 
7 
2 


2 

1 
25 ' 
13 . 

1 


1 
10 
17 


2 
15 

7 
2 

1 


1 



























4S 

15 

145 

136 

9 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



207 



Mortality in Somerville in 1922. — continued 





>> 

u 

d 

i-s 


u 


A 

o 


ft 

< 




oj 
C 

P 

1-5 


1 
3 


1/3 

bo 

3 


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0) 

a 

a) 
+j 
ft 

03 
CO 


u 

o 
o 

O 


u 


o 


u 

a 

o 


Is 
o 


V. Diseases of the Respira- 
tory System. 


2 

13 
5 


1 

10 
13 

1 


2 

10 

12 

1 


4 
3 
4 
1 
1 














1 

9 
4 


13 

9 


10 


100A Broncho Pneumonia 


5 
5 


4 
3 


2 


1 


2 

1 


5 

3 


77 
59 








1 


103 Pulmonary Congestion 


1 










1 


2 


1 


7 










1 


VI . Diseases of the Dig estive 

System. 
108 Diseases of the Month and 


1 


1 




















1 




1 






1 














3 










1 
3 
1 










1 


113 Diarrhea and Enteritis 

(under 2 years) 

114 Diarrhea and Enteritis 

(over 2 years) 


1 
1 


3 


1 


1 


1 








1 


2 


1 


13 






3 






1 














1 


118B Intestinal Obstruction 


1 


2 
















1 


1 


5 


1 
















1 


















1 




1 




? 






1 














1 


124 Other Diseases of the Liver 

126 Peritonitis 

127 Pancreatitis 

VII. Non Venereal Diseases 

of the genito-urinary 

System and Annex a. 








1 














1 


1 

1 

1 
2 








1 

i 








1 






3 


1 

6 


















1 


129 Chronic Nephritis 


4 


1 


4 


8 


4 


2 


3 


3 
1 


1 


4 


42 




1 


132 Calculi of the Urinary 

Passages 

133 Diseases of the Bladder 








1 
1 
















1 








1 








1 








2 












1 




1 


VIII. The Puerperal State 

144 Puerperal Hemorrhage ... 
146 Puerperal Septicaemia 










1 












1 






1 




1 














2 


1 




















1 


148 Eclampsia 

IX. Diseases of the Skin 
and Cellular Tissues. 

152 Carbuncle 
















1 








1 












1 












1 


153 Abscess 


I 






















1 


154 Pemphigus 








1 












1 




1 












1 















208 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Mortality in Somerville in 1922. — continued 





u 

a 
G 

ei 

>-> 


3 
u 

42 

<D 


43 
c 


ft 




6 


3 
<-9 


>5 

s 


*3 

3 

be 
3 
< 


<D 

42 

a 

a> 
■u 
a 
<x> 


s> 

42 
O 
O 

O 


u 

42 

a 

> 
O 


42 

a 

V 

ft 


*3 

O 


X. Diseases of the Bones 

and of the 

Organs of Locomotion 

XI. Malformations. 

159B Congenital Malformation 
of Heart 


4 


2 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 






1 
1 

1 
1 


2 

1 


11 
1 


159C Pseudencephalus 










XII. Early Infancy. 
160 Congenital Debility 


2 
4 
2 

1 


4 


1 
1 


2 
5 


3 
2 
1 

1 


1 


1 
1 


1 
1 


3 
1 


4 
2 
1 


13 

25 

5 


161A Premature Birth 


161B Injury at Birth '. 


162 Other Diseases Peculiar to 
Early Infancy..... 






1 
1 






1 






2 


XIII. Old Age. 
164 Senility 


1 


1 




2 


2 


1 


10 










XIV. External Causes. 

167 Suicide by Illuminating 
Gas 




' 






1 
1 














1 


2 


168 Suicide by Hanging 






















1 


169 Suicide by Drowning 


















1 






1 


172 Suicide by Jumping from 
Window 






















1 

1 


1 


177 Accidental Poisoning 
























1 


178 Suffocation 






1 


















1 


179 Accidental Burns 


1 








1 


1 


1 


i 


1 

1 
1 
5 






4 


181 Accidental Absorption of 
Illuminating Gas 


i 
















1 


182 Accidental Drowning 














1 










2 


185 Accidental Fall 




1 








2 


3 




1 




12 


188A Railroad Accident 


1 


1 


188C Automobile Accident 


! 


2 


1 


1 






1 

1 




3 


1 


1 


10 


196 Accidental Electric Shock 






1 


197 Homicide by Firearms 


1 

1 
L13 






















1 


XV. Ill-Defined Causes. 
205A Surgical Shock 


L18 


1 
90 






1 
80 






1 


1 

89 






4 




75 


86 


63 


65 


46 


83 


Lll 




Total 


1019 



Population estimated 97,000 

Death rate per thousand 10.41 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 
DEATHS BY AGES. 



209 



Under one 
One to two 
Two to three 
Three to five 
Five to ten 
Ten to fifteen 
Fifteen to twenty 
Twenty to thirty 
Thirty to forty . 
Forty to fifty 
Fifty to sixty 
Sixty to seventy 
Seventy to eighty 
Eighty to ninety 
Ninety and over 



Total 



Ages. 



Total. 



116 

29 

14 

10 

21 

17 

16 

27 

40 

73 

115 

200 

216 

94 

31 



1019 



Male. 



75 

18 

9 

6 

11 

9 

6 

11 

13 

29 

52 

97 

91 

33 

9 



469 



Female. 



41 

11 

5 

4 

10 

8 

10 

16 

27 

44 

63 

103 

125 

61 

22 



550 



Table of Deaths During the Last Ten Years. 

Kate 

No. of per 

Year. Deaths. 1,000 

1913 993 12.11 

1914 990 11.66 

1915 1,003 11.56 

1916 1,081 12.01 

1917 1,067 11.85 

1918 . 1,533 16.84 

1919 1,074 11.30 

1920 1,137 12.22 

1921 986 10.38 

1922 1,019 10.41 

Average death, rate per 1000 for ten years , . 12.03 



Table Showing the Five 



Principal Causes 
in 1922 



of Death in Somerville 



Heart 
Disease. 






203 



lo 



so 



20.92 



Arterio 
Sclerosis 



©£ 
E % 



136 



ft ft 

££ 

So 
so 



15.05 



Pneumonia 
All Forms. 



SQ 



136 



ft ft 

ft£ 
»-^ 

S8 



15.05 



Apoplexy. 






92 



f- ft 
ftp. 



3*. 



9.48 



Cancer 



s« 



88 



ft ft 

ft£ 

|o 

98 
so 



9.7 



210 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 





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HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 211 

Disease Dangerous to the Public Health 

This board has adjudged that the diseases known as 
actinomycosis, anterior poliomyelitis, anthrax, Asiatic chol- 
era, cerebrospinal meningitis, chicken pox, diphtheria, dog- 
bite (requiring anti-rabic treatment), dysentery, German 
measles, glanders, hookworm disease, infectious disease of the 
eye, influenza, leprosy, malaria, measles, mumps, pellagra, 
plague, pneumonia (lobar only), rabies, scarlet fever, septic 
sore throat, small pox, tetanus, trichinosis, tuberculosis (all 
forms), typhoid fever, typhus fever, whooping cough, yellow 
fever, are infectious or contagious and dangerous to the pub- 
lic health and safety within the meaning of the statutes. 
Physicians are required to report immediately to the board 
every case of either of these diseases coming under their care 
and postal cards conveniently printed and addressed are sup- 
plied to them for the purpose. On receipt of a card from a 
physician, the principal of the school in the district in which 
the patient resides, the librarian of the public library and 
state board of health are notified. 



Specimens and Supplies 

Outfits for specimens to be examined for tuberculosis, 
diphtheria, and typhoid fever, and diphtheria anti-toxin, vac- 
cine lymph and nitrate of silver solution may be obtained 
at the laboratory and at the following places : 

Edward Edwards, 25 Union Square. 
R. A. Peckham, 154 Perkins Street. 
Richardson Pharmacy, 310 Broadway. 
Ernest B. McClure, 529 Medford Street. 
George E. Wardrobe, 693 Broadway 
Willis S. Furbush & Co., 1153 Broadway. 
Hall Drug Co., Hobbs building, Davis Square. 
John Morrison, 288 Highland Avenue. 

Hereafter the Agent of this Board will collect, daily, 
at five o'clock, p. m., all specimens left at culture stations 
for examination, prior to that hour. 

Physicians desiring reports on the following day, of 
specimens taken after this collection has been made must 
deposit the same at the City Hall Annex, in the receptacle 
provided, before nine-thirty p. m. 

Results of all examinations of specimens received at the 
City Hall Annex prior to nine-thirty p. m., will be reported 
to the physicians on the following morning. 



212 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Medical Inspection at Schools 

The medical inspection of the schools of Somerville, 
which was instituted in December, 1907, has been continued 
during the year. The value of the system has been constant- 
ly demonstrated, and the work has been done in a very satis- 
factory manner. There has been harmony of action between 
the board of health and the school board, and the school prin- 
cipals and teachers have very generally co-operated with the 
inspectors in making the system as successful as possible. 

The inpectors make daily visits to the schools under 
their charge, and to them are referred all children who show 
evidences of disease or abnormal conditions. Children who 
are found to be unfit to remain in school are sent home, ac- 
companied by a slip properly filled out advising that the fam- 
ily physician be consulted. The inspectors also make an an- 
nual inspection of all the children in the schools, and any 
defects discovered are called to the attention of the parents. 
Monthly inspections of the school buildings and premises are 
made, and suggestions or criticisms are referred to the proper 
authorities. Every effort is made to protect the health of the 
children and to co-operate with the parents in keeping the 
children in as normal a condition as possible. 

In accordance with the provisions of the statute, tests 
of sight and hearing are made by the principals or teachers. 

District No. 1 

Inspector Dr. Francis Shaw, 57 Cross Street. 
Schools Eastern Junior High, Prescott, Hanscom, 
Edgerly and Boys' Vocational schools- 
District No. 2 

Inspector Dr. Edward J. Dailey, 46 Bow Street. 
Schools Baxter, Knapp, Perry and Southern Junior 
High Schools. 

District No. 3 

Inspector Dr. Walter Jellis, 1028 Broadway. 
Schools Bennett, Pope, Cummings and Proctor 
Schools. 



District No. 4 

Inspector Dr. W. L. Bond, 322 Highland Avenue. 
Schools Morse, Carr, Durell, Burns and Girls' Voca- 
tional Schools. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 213 



District No. 5 



Inspector Dr. H. M. Stood] ey, 283 Highland Avenue. 
Schools Brown, Bingham, Forster and Northern Ju- 
nior High Schools. 

District No. 6 

Inspector Dr. H. Cholerton, 94 College Avenue. 
Schools Western Junior High, Lincoln, Highland, 
Cutler and Lowe Schools. 

District No. 7 

Inspector Dr. E. F. Sew all,. 281 Broadway. 
Schools Glines and High Schools. 

Inspector Dr. M. W. White, 21 Walnut Street. 

Schools Parochial. 

During the year, 9,856 children have been referred to 

the inspectors during their daily visits, and 532 have been 
sent home because of illness. 

The following list will show the classes of diseases and 
defects which have been found in the schools, except defects 
of sight and hearing: — 

List of Diseases and Number of Cases 'Reported 

1. Infectious diseases: — 

Chicken Pox ....... 60 

Measles . . 141 

Mumps 52 

Scarlet Fever 2 

Whooping Cough 6 

Influenza 3 

Total 264 

2. Diseases of the nose and throat: — 

Enlarged tonsils and adenoids . . . 574 

Inflammatory diseases 383 

Total 957 

3. Diseases of the eyes: — 

Inflammatory conditions 65 

Foreign bodies 2 

Other abnormal conditions .... 17 

Total 84 

4. Diseases of the ears: — 

Inflammatory conditions 66 

Other abnormal conditions .... 7 

Total 73 



214 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Diseases of the skin: 
Eczema 
Herpes 
Impetigo 
Pediculosis 
Scabies 
Tinea . 
Miscellaneous conditions 



Total 

6. Miscellaneous diseases: — 

Diseases of the circulatory system 
Diseases of the digestive system 
Diseases of the lymphatic system 
Diseases of the nervous system 
Diseases of the respiratory system 
Wounds and injuries 
Diseases of the teeth 
Other conditions 

Total 

Total number of diseases reported 
Vaccinations performed . 
Examinations for vaccinations 
Certificate to work . . 



47 

28 

158 

435 

74 

1 

158 



8 
94 
42 
10 
98 
91 
12 
46 



901 



401 

2680 

75 

699 

131 



Bacteriological Work. 

The report of the work of this department is made by 
Frank L. Morse, M. D., on a subsequent page and becomes a 
part of this report. 

Undertakers. 

Under the provisions of Section 49 of Chapter 114 of 
the General Laws, twenty-three persons have been duly li- 
censed as undertakers. 

Examination of Plumbers. 

The public statutes provide for a board of examiners of 
plumbers, consisting of the chairman of the board of health, 
the inspector of buildings, and an expert at plumbing, to be 
appointed by the board of health. This board appointed 
Duncan C. Greene, the inspector of plumbing, to fill the place 
of expert. The number of licenses granted will be found in 
the report of the inspector of buildings. 



Health Nurses. 

There are at present five nurses employed by this board. 
Two of these are employed as school nurses and the work of 
the others consists of follow-up work regarding tuberculosis 
cases and post-natal baby hygiene work. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 215 

The reports of the school nurses are made a part of the 
report of the School Committee and those of the other nurses 
are made a part of this report being submitted in detail in 
subsequent pages. 



Infant Hygiene Clinics. 

During the past year under the supervision of this board, 
clinics have been held every Thursday afternoon at the Ben- 
nett Schoolhouse and every Friday afternoon at the Bingham 
Schoolhouse except when those days were holidays. 528 ba- 
bies have been registered at these clinics. The average weekly 
attendance at the Bennett Schoolhouse was 40 and at the 
Bingham Schoolhouse 60. 

This work is of inestimable value and the results are very 
far reaching. 

C. A. C. Richardson, Chairman,. 
Wesley M. Goff, 
Warren C. Blair. 



Attest : 

Laurence S. Howard, Clerk 



216 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF HEALTH NURSES. 



To the Board of Health, 



Somerville, Mass., 

January 1, 1923. 



Gentlemen : — 



We submit the following report of work performed by us 
in infant hygiene, post natal and tuberculosis cases for the 
year ending December 31, 1922. 



Infant Hygiene. 

Infants reported as born in Somerville during 1922 
Infants born elsewhere resident in Somerville 
Pairs of twins born in Somerville . . 
Sets of triplets born in Somerville . 
Still-births in Somerville .... 
Infants who moved away from Somerville . 
Infants reported with Ophthalmia Neonatorum 
Infants reported with Conjunctivitis . 
Infants reported with Infantile Paralysis . 



1661 

258 

12 

1 

56 

213 

7 

9 

5 



There were one hundred and eleven deaths of infants 
under one year of age in Somerville during the past year as 
shown in the following table: 



Prematurity 

Congenital diseases 

Intestinal diseases (Breast fed 2 — Artificially fed 13) 

Accidental injury 

Pneumonia and other diseases 

Infants dying in Somerville residence elsewhere 

Total 

Infants under supervision at Baby Welfare Clinics 

Jan. 1, 1922 

Registration during 1922 

Total under supervision during 1922 . . . . 



29 
26 
15 

1 
33 

7 
111 

718 
628 

1246 



Tuberculosis. 

Pulmonary tuberculosis cases reported in 1922 
Other forms of tuberculosis reported in 1922 
Patients admitted to Sanatoria . 
Patients previously reported in Sanatoria . 
Deaths in Sanatoria 15. Discharged 16. 
Patients now in Sanatoria .... 
Patients temporarily out of Somerville . 
Patients who have moved away from Somerville 



98 
15 
38 
52 
31 
45 
28 
21 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



21T 



TABLES SHOWINO AGES AND SEX OF CASES IN THIS CITY. 

Pulmonary Tuberculosis. 



Ages 



Under fifteen years 

From fifteen to twenty years 
From twenty to thirty years 
From thirty to forty years... 
Over forty years 

Total 



Sex 



Male 



4 

2 

22 

10 

18 



56 



v 
Female 



1 
5 

19 
9 

8 



42 



Total 



5 

7 
41 
19 
26 



98 



Other Forms of Tuberculosis. 



Ages 


Sex 


Total 


Male 


Female 




Under fifteen years 


2 
2 

1 
1 
2 


1 
1 
4 

1 


3 


From fifteen to twenty 


3 


From twenty to thirty years 


5 


From thirty to forty years 


1 


Over forty years 


3 






Total 


8 


7 


15 







Miscellaneous. 

Typhoid Fever cases reported (died 4) . 

Recapitulation of Visits. 

Balby Hygiene 

Tuberculosis) ....... 

Miscellaneous 

Total visits . 



18 



8486 
743 
328 

9557 



Respectfully submitted, 

Helen B. Berry, 
Mary L. Scott, R. N., 
Grace E. Pickering, R. N. 

Health Nurses. 



218 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION. 



To the Board of Health, 
Somerville, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 



Somerville, Mass., 

January 1, 1923. 



I herewith present the report of the Department of Medi- 
cal Inspection for the 3^ear 1922 including statistics of the 
Contagious Hospital. 



Visits. 

Scarlet Fever — Each case must foe inspected before release 
from quarantine to see that the condition of the 
patient is suitable for release 164 

Diphtheria — (Before patients are released from, quarantine two 

successive negative cultures must be obtained . . 108 

Contagious Hospital 366 

Total number of visits . 638 



Contagious Disease Hospital. 



Diseases 
Diphtheria 
Scarlet Fever . 


Discharged 
In Hospital Ad- Well or 
Jan. 1. 1922 mitted improved 
13 124 112 
7 67 64 


Dead 
17 
2 


In 
Hospital 
Jan. 
1, 1923 

8 

8 


Miscellaneous . 


9 9 









The daily average of patients was 9.5. 



LABORATORY EXAMINATIONS. 



January 

February 

March . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . 

September 

October . 

November 

December 

Totals 



Diphtheria. 






Negative 


Positive 


Tots 


116 


7 


123 


129 


9 


138 


65 


22 


87 


118 


18 


136 


69 


5 


74 


34 


1 


35 


17 


2 


19 


28 


2 


30 


38 


4 


42 


45 


10 


55 


102 


22 


124 


118 


19 


137 



879 



121 



1000 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



219 



January 

February 

March . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 



1 UUCI CUIU5IS* 






Negative 


Positive 


Total 


10 


2 


12 


. . 10 


3 


13 


10 


3 


13 


13 


3 


16 


14 


1 


15 


16 


4 


20 


6 


3 


9 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


3 


9 


2 


11 


6 


3 


9 


10 


2 


12 



107 



28 



135 



Typhoid. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 

Examinations made for Malaria, Oph- 
thalmia, Paratyphoid, Gonorrhea and 
Pneumonia 



Negative Positive 



1 


1 

3 
10 
7 
7 
7 
3 
3 

42 



Total 
1 



1 


3 
12 
8 
9 
9 
3 
3 

49 



Total examinations 



1193 



Tuberculosis. 

During 1922 there were 32 deaths from Tuberculosis in- 
cluding all forms, 31 of which were of the pulmonary type. 
This record shows a continued decrease from the previous 
year when 64 deaths were reported, and the tuberculosis 
death rate per 10,000 of the population has been still further 
reduced from 5.8 in 1921 to 3.3 in 1922. 

All patients ill with the disease coming to the attention 
of the board have either been supervised at their homes by 
the Public Health Nurses, or have been placed in sanatoria 
when such treatment was needed. 



220 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The tuberculosis ward at the Contagious Hospital which 
was closed on September 1, 1921, still remains closed, as 
there has been no apparent necessity of its being reopened. 

Infant Hygiene Clinics 

On January 1, 1922 the board with the approval of His 
Honor the Mayor, assumed the care of the Infant Hygiene 
Clinics previously maintained by Somerville Chapter of the 
American Red Cross. These clinics have been held on Thurs- 
day afternoon at the Bennett School and Friday afternoon at 
the Bingham School throughout the year. An average atten- 
dance of 40 at the Bingham School and 60 at the Bennett 
School has been attained. 528 new babies have been regis- 
tered at the clinics where advice has been given to the mothers 
by the attending physician, and in many instances the in- 
fants have been visited at home by the Public Health Nurses 
in order that the advise may be properly followed out. This 
work is unquestionably of great value in conserving the 
health of new born infants. 

With the approval of the Mayor an additional Public 
Health Nurse, was elected on January 1st and the city re- 
districted alloting one nurse to each of the three districts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank L. Morse, 

Medical Inspector and Bacteriologist. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 221 

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND PROVISIONS. 

Somerville, Mass., 

January 1, 1923. 

To the Board of Health, 
Somerville, Mass. 

Gentlemen : — 

I submit the following as my report for the year ending 
December 31, 1922. 

Inspections. 

The following table shows the number of inspections made 
during the past year. In order to safeguard the consumer, all 
establishments handling foodstuffs are under constant super- 
vision. Lunch carts and restaurants have been inspected 
weekly. 

Under the provisions of the General Laws of 1920 all 
bakeries are required to register with the Board of Health. The 
law provides that all doors and windows shall be properly 
screened and that all food exposed for sale shall be kept 
covered. Careful inspections of all bakeries have been made 
to see that this law has been complied with. 

All the factories in the city have been inspected monthly. 

The Barber Shops are under very careful inspection and 
must be kept in a sanitary condition, and the barbers are re- 
quired to keep themselves neat and clean and to properly steri- 
lize their instruments. 



Number of Inspections. 



Bakeries . 

Barker shops 

Billiard Halls and Bowl- 
ling alleys 

Blacksmiths' shops 

Candy and Ice Cream 
plants 

Factories . 

Fish markets . 

Hen houses and yards 

Lunch rooms and care 



370 


Milk and Cream pliantE 


i 136 


348 


Pedlers and Wagons an<3 


i 


L- 


stock 


2141 


40 


Public Halls . 


40 


21 


Rendering plants . 


125 


i 


Slaughter houses . 


259 


187 


Stores and markets 


3857 


166 


Staibles . 


208 


659 


Theatres 


77 


239 


Vacant lots and dumps 


69 


572 


Yards and cellars . 


276 



222 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 
Articles Condemned. 



The following is a list of the articles condemned : 

Fish. 

£! ams 2 gal. 

° lams . 3% bus. 

Cod 22 lbs. 

Haddock . 841 nj S 

Halibut .164 lbs. 

(Mackerel 36l3 m& 

Salmon 118 m3 

Smelts . . 8 lbs. 

Sword Fish 242 lbs 



Fruit. 



Apples 












2 bbl. 


Apples 












16 bus. 


Bananas . 












24 d<oz. 


Blackberries 












27 qts. 


Canteloupes 












14 cts. 


Grape Fruit 












19 cts. 


Grape Fruit 












9% box 


Grapes 












27 bas. 


Lemons 












30 doz. 


Lemons 












Vz box 


Oranges . 












9 box 


Peaches . 












6 bus. 


Peaches . 












17 bas. 


Plums 












11 bas. 


Raspberries 












9 qts. 


Strawberries 












119 qts. 



Meats. 

Bacon 223 lbs. 

Bolonga 88 lbs. 

Beef Ocorned) 568 lbs. 

Beef (corned) 28 Cans. 

Beef (fresh) 736 lbs. 

Fowl 645 lbs. 

Frankfurts ...... 24 lbs. 

Lamb 1150 lbs. 

Ham .... ... 222 lbs. 

Liver 68 lbs. 

Pork (fresh) 292 lbs. 

Sausages 109 lbs. 

Steak (Hamburg) .... 26 lbs. 

Tripe 57 lbs. 

Turkey 19 lbs. 

Veal 76 lbs. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



223 



Vegetables. 




Asparagus ... 59 bun. 


Beans (string) 






- 


10 bus. 


Beans (string) 








5 bas. 


Beans (string) 








5 box. 


Beets 








4 bus. 


Cabbages 








2 bbl. 


Carrots 








2 bus. 


Greens 








18 bus. 


Lettuce 








9 bus. 


Lettuce 








2 box. 


Lettuce 








2 doz. 


Onions 








2 bus. 


Onions 








81 cts. 


Parsnips . 








2 bus. 


Potatoes (white) 








22 bus. 


Potatoes (sweet) 








1 bus. 


Squash 








6 bbl. 


Tomatoes 








5 cts. 


Tomatoes 








21 bas. 


Turnips . 








6 bus 



Miscellaneous. 

Bread . . v 30 loaves 

Cerial 120 pack. 

Crackers & cakes 18 cans. 

Flour 10 bags 

Slaughter Houses. 

During the year weekly inspections have been made at all 
slaughtering establishments and these plants were never in 
a more sanitary condition than at present. 

The number of animals slaughtered during 1922 in this 
city was somewhat less than during previous years. 



Number of Animals Slaughtered in 1922. 

Swine . 

Sheep 

Calves 

Cattle 



815,319 
325,816 

107,788 
32,989 

1,281,912 



Examination of Animals for Contagious Diseases. 
Glanders. 

Nine horses in one stable were affected by glanders in 
this city, all of which were destroyed. One other horse in 
another stable was placed under quarantine, but afterwards 
released. 



224 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Animals Examined. 



Horses 
Cows 
Goats 
Dogs 





Quaran- 






Inspected 


tined 


Killed 


Released 


1970 


10 


9 


1 


7 











21 











26 


26 


6 


20 



2024 



36 



15 



21 



Respectfully submitted, 

Charles M. Berry, V. S., 
Inspector of Animals and Provisions. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



225 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF MILK AND VINEGAR. 

Chemical and Bacteriological Laboratory, 
City Hall Annex, 
Somerville, Mass., 
January 1, 1923. 
To the Board of Health, 

Somerville, Mass. 
Gentlemen : — 

I herewith present my annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1922. 

On the above date there were in this city licensed to sell 
milk, 689 stores and 74 dealers; and 100 stores were licensed 
to sell oleomargarine. 

Of the 74 dealers, 22 are located in this city, 41 in neigh- 
boring cities, and 4 dealers have discontinued business, and 
2 dealers were refused a license. Thirty-five dealers are pas- 
teurizing milk according to statute, and 7 dealers sell only 
cream, the balance selling raw milk. 

There are approximately 35,000 quarts of market milk 
and 2500 quarts of cream distributed in Somerville daily. 
Many "special milks" are sold by the various dealers, who 
claim superior quality for their goods. At the present time 
this department has no further control over these "special 
milks" than to see that they comply with the legal standards 
prescribed for any milk. 

Table 1. 



Months. 


3 

8.2 

M P. 

< 


■Sfc 


"3 

o 

+3 cc 

a 
< 


^ 2 

•i-t CC 

n, in 

CO f>> 

06 


CD 3 

eg « 

o 


Total 

Income for 

Dept. 


January 


20 
13 
38 
16 
527 
112 
40 
31 
16 
12 
21 
20 


10.00 

6.50 

19.00 

8.00 

263.50 

56.00 

20.00 

15.50 

8.00 

6.00 

10.50 

10.00 




10.00 

8.00 

25.50 

8.00 

263.50 

59.50 

21.50 

16.50 

8.00 

6.00 

J9.50 

11.50 


26.50 

31.00 

30.00 

42.50 

18.00 

25.00 

22.50 

42.50 

6.50 

29.50 

4.50 

2.00 


36.50 


February 


1.50 
6.50 


39.00 


March 


55.50 


April 


50.50 


May 




281.50 


June 


3.50 
1.50 
1.00 


84.50 


July 


44.00 


August 


59.00 


September 


14.50 


October 




35.50 


November 




14.00 


December 


1.50 


13.50 


Total 


866 


433.00 


15.50 


447.50 


280.50 


728.00 







JRefund on 2 applications refused $1.00. 



226 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Income for Department as per above list $ 728 00 

Rebate from Merrimac Chemical Company 1 00 

Witness fees (East Cambridge ( 1 60 

Rebate on Automobile license 6 00 

Realized from sale of Buick touring car 320 00 

Fines in Somerville Court 80 00 

Total income for department $1135 60 

In addition fines going to other courts as a result of depart- 
ment activities $50 00 

.lie two following tables are a summary of the laboratory work 
during ld'2'2. Table 2. 

Samples of Milk, Cream, Ice Cream and Vinegar Examined. 



Months. 


Chemical 
Samples 
Collected. 


C 

. o 
o 


Lorenz 

Tests. 


Total 

Collections. 


go 3 

GO 


Total 
Examina- 
tions. 


January 


167 

202 

256 

263 

302 

217. 

269 

202 

259 

168 

230 

196 


79 
16 
56 
56 
44 
49 
62 
76 
31 
30 
62 
34 


69 
49 
40 
58 
42 
49 
H4 
54 
31 
30 
62 

34 

i 


315 

267 
352 
377 
388 
315 
395 
332 
321 
228 
354 
264 


39 
59 
69 
82 
36 
50 
48 
87 
13 
56 
5 
4 


354 


February 


326 


March 


421 


April 


459 


May 


424 


June 


365 


July 

August 


443 
419 


September 

October 


334 

284 


November 

December 


359 

268 


Total 


2731 


595 


582 


3908 


548 


4456 



Table 3. 



Months. 


Chemical 
Notices. 


Baet. 
Notices. 


03 Hr 
'J. " 


Temperature 
Notices. 


Total 
Notices. 


Inspections. 


January 


1 

2 

22 

11 

22 

30 

21 

12 

6 

3 

4 

3 


2 

4 

4 

12 

3 

18 

19 

22 

8 

9 

17 

9 






3 

7 
30 
23 

26 

82 


28 


February 


1 

4 




18 


March 




11 


April 




8 


May 


1 
27 

5 
14 
4 
4 
9 
3 




14 


June 


7 


68 


July 


9 54 


108 


August 


2 


50 
18 
16 
32 
15 

356 


34 


September 

October 


182 




67 


November 

December .. 


2 


76 
61 








Total 


137 


127 


-•2 


20 


675 







HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



227 



Each month during the year pint samples have been 
taken from every milk dealer and analyzed for food value 
(fats and solids) and cleanliness (bacterial count and sedi- 
ment) and the yearly average is shown in the alphabetical 
list of dealers which follows : 

The higher the fat and solids the greater the food value. 
The lower the bacterial count, the greater care in production, 
better handling or more efficient pasteurization is shown. 



Regular Market Milks. 

Bacteria 
Per C. C. 
Butter Fat Total Solids Maximum 

Legal Legal Allowed Heated 

Name of Dealer Standard Standard Raw 500,000 or 

3.35 p.c. 12.00 p.c. Past. 100,000 Raw 

A. H. Andrews 3.70 12.26 36,000 Past. 

H. E. Bemis 3.75 12.40 113,000 Past. 

J. A. Bergman 3.87 12.60 82,000 Past. 

E. E. Breen 3.83 12.49 53,500 Past. 

F. S. Cummings Co 3.75 12.27 89,000 Past. 

Donnelly Brothers 3.69 12.25 219,000 Past. 

F. C. Edgerley 3.82 12.42 273,000 Past. 

*F. E. Giles 3.67 12.20 242,400 Past. 

tJ. E. & H. J. Giroux 3.64 12.32 99,000 Raw 

tB. J. Griffin 3.61 12.16 129,000 Raw 

tJ. P. Griffin 3.63 12.27 153,000 Raw 

J. M. Hager & Son 3.88 12.53 87,000 Past. 

■fM. B. Harris 3.62 12.20 415,000 Raw 

Herlihy Brothers 3.96 12.57 80,000 Past. 

H. P. Hood & Son 3.73 12.35 110,000 Past. 

Kendall Brothers 3.59 12.11 213,800 Raw 

Maple Farm Milk Co 3.73 12.29 121,000 Past. 

E. M. Monahan 3.72 12.32 97,500 Past. 

J. J. Mulkerin 3.61 12.24 235,000 Raw 

W. F. Noble & Sons 3.91 12.55 38,000 Past. 

P. O'Shaughnessey 3.68 12.17 185,000 Past. 

fS. E. Paige 3.59 12.11 422,000 Raw 

Plymouth Creamery System 3.93 12.61 79,000 Past. 

H. A. Prescott 3.63 12.25 103,000 Past. 

T. F. Ronayne 3.90 12.47 544,000 Raw 

tSeven Oaks Dairy Co 3.83 12.45 42,000 Raw 

M. P. Shattuck 3.66 12.31 265,000 Past. 

H. L. Stone 3.65 12.21 43,000 Past. 

W. E. Stuart Co 3.78 12.52 65,500 Past. 

tSwenson Brothers 3.S4 12.47 169,000 Raw 

*F. P. Thompson & Son 3.53 11.93 834,000 Raw 

G. E. Thompson 3.73 12.32 119,000 Raw 

Toothaker Brothers 3.94 12.62 44,000 Past. 

Turner Center Creamery .... 3.95 12.69 73,000 Past. 

A. S. Tyler 3.57 12.13 209,000 Raw 

E. L. Tyler 3.66 12.20 501,000 Raw 

Whiting Milk Co 3.77 12.27 17,000 Past. 

tC. A. Woodbury 3.69 12.25 60,000 Raw 

* Found guilty and fined in Somerville Court. 

t Since January 1, 1923 these dealers are on the pasteurized list. 



228 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Special Priced Milks. 

Milk commanding an increased price due to special care 
in production or greater food value. 

Butter Fat Total Bacteria 
Dealer Solids 

F. S. Cummings Co 3.89 12.51 52,000 Codman Farm 

F. S. Cummings Co.... 3.88 12.49 90,000 Baby 

F. S. Cummings Co.... 3.97 12.68 90,000 Grade A 

F. . S. Cummings Co.... 5.11 14.13 19,600 Mixter Farm 

J. M. Hager & Son 4.27 13.12 162,000 Grade A 

H. P. Hood & Sons Co. 3.66 12.39 11,600 Bonnie Brook 

H. P. Hood & Sons Co. 4.16 12.86 4,300 Grade A 

H. P. Hood & Sons Co. 4.00 12.85 8,000 Cherry Hill 

H. P. Hood & Sons Co. 4.42 12.52 3,100 Hood Farm 

Herlihy Brothers 4.11 12.58 229,000 Grade A 

W. F. Noble 4.23 13.08 6,540 Grade A 

W. F. Noble 4.95 14.40 1,700 Blossom Hill 

W. F. Noble 4.18 13.08 147,000 Carey Farm 

Seven Oaks Dairy Co. 3.93 12.61 109,000 Special 

H. L. Stone 3.99 12.79 20,000 Special 

Walker Gordon Lab 4.46 13.40 30,000 

Whiting Milk Co 4.06 12.71 21,700 Grade A 

Whiting Milk Co 4.02 12.87 27,500 Hampshire Hills 

The General Laws define the terms used in this report as 
follows : 

''Heated Milk". — Milk which has been subjected to arti- 
ficial heat greater than one hundred and sixty-seven degrees 
Fahrenheit. 

''Pasteurized Milk". — Natural cows milk not more than 
72 hours old when pasteurized subjected for a period of not 
less than thirty minutes to a temperature of not less than one 
hundred and forty nor more than one hundred and forty-five 
degrees Fahrenheit and immediately thereafter cooled to a 
temperature of fifty degrees Fahrenheit or lower. 



Recommendations. 

1. It is important that a strict supervision be given 
processing plants both in the city and in the country. With 
the present personnel of the department it is impossible to 
do so, and an inspector who devotes his entire time to cream- 
ery, milk plant and dairy inspection is much to be desired. 

2. This department does not recommend "special railks." 
Most of the regular "market milk" will compare very favorably 
with the "special milks" now sold. 



Eespectfully submitted, 

Herbert E. 



Bowman. 



Inspector of Milk and Vinegar. 



CITY CLERK. 



229 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK 



Office of the City Clerk, 
January 1, 1923. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen : — 

Gentlemen : — The following is respectfully submitted as 
the fifty-first annual report of the City Clerk of the City of 
Somerville, and is for the year ending December 31, 1922. 

The receipts and payments were as follows : — 



Receipts. 

Balance from year 1921, being for dog li- 
censes issued in December 1921:- 
3 males at $2.00 . 
2 females at $5.00 . 
1 spayed at $2.00 . . 



Less city clerk's fees paid to the city 
treasurer, 6 @ $ .20 



For dog licenses issued in 1922: — 
698 males at $2.00 
170 females at $5.00 
100 spayed at $2.00 . 
1 kennel at $25.00 



$ 6 


00 


10 


00 


9 

u 


00 


18 


00 


1 


20 


1396 


00 


850 


00 


200 


00 


25 


00 



$16 80 



2,471 00 



For hunting and fishing licenses issued 
in 1922 
235 hunting and fishing at $2.00 
98 hunting and trapping at $1.50 

1 alien hunting at $15.00 
227 fishing at $1.00 

3 alien fishing at $2.00 . 



470 00 

147 00 

15 00 

227 00 

6 00 



865 00 



Recording mortgages, assignments, etc., 

818 papers 1,200 40 

Certificates of marriage intentions, — 

1214 licenses and 1 duplicate . . 1,215 00 

Furnishing copies of records . . . 246 00 

Amounts carried forward . . . $2,661 40 



$3,352 80 



230 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts carried forward .. . . $2,661 40 $3,352 80 

Licenses: — 

Auctioneers, 34 licenses at $2.00 . 68 00 

Biiliard and pool tables and bowling al- 
leys: — 

178 licenses for 119 ta- 
bles and 59 alleys 
. at $2.00 . . 356 00 

Drain layers, 7 at $1.00 ... 7 00 

Drivers, 10 licenses at $1.00 . 10 00 

Engines and motors: — 

33 licenses for 25 motors, 7 engines 

and 1 furnace at $1.00 ... 33 00 

Garages: — 

501 licenses, including 11 granted in 

1921, at $2.00 1,020 00 

Gasoline tanks, 47 licenses at $1.00 . 47 00 

Hackney carriages, 13 licenses at $1.00 13 00 

Intelligence offices, 4 licenses at $2.00 . 8 00 

Junk and second hand licenses: — 

30 licenses, including 3 in 1921, at 

$10.00 300 00 

20 licenses, including 1 in 1920, and 
1 in 1921, at $25.00 .... 

Lodging house licenses, 4 at $2.00 

Second hand auto licenses, 17 at $25.00 . 

Slaughtering, 7 at $1.00 

Street Musicians, 9 licenses for 9 per- 
sons at 50 

Victualler licenses, 14 at $2.00 

Wagons, 87 licenses at $1.00 

Wagon stands, 13 licenses at $1.00 

Permits for projections over sidewalks: — 
41 permits for 10 signs, 7 electric 
signs, 7 swing arms, 3 marquees, 2 
barber poles, 2 coal holes, 2 filling 
traps, 1 stationary clock, 1 projec- 
tion, 1 wire across street, 1 awn- 
ing, at $1.00 41 00 

Filing certificates, under Acts of 1908, 

Chap. 502, at $ .50 ... . 1 50 

Interest on deposits 12 45 

Repairing and sale of junk badges . 1 25 

Witness fees 60 

Sale of Old Ballots 47 93 

Optometrists registration 3 at $ .50 1 50 

Physicians' registrations, 6 at $ .25 . . 1 50 

Refund bond premium .... 59 5,704 22 

Total receipts . . . 9,057 02 



500 


00. 


8 


00 


425 


00 


7 


00 


4 


50 


28 


00 


87 


00 


13 


00 



CITY CLERK. 



231 



Payments. 



To Charles E. Hatfield, county treasurer, 
June 1, and December 1, receipts for 
dog licenses from December 1, 1921, to 
November 30, 1922, both inclusive: — 

699 males at 2.00 

172 females at $5.00 . . 
101 spayed at $2.00 . 

1 kennel at $25.00 .... 



Less city clerk s fees, 973 at $ .20 



1,398 


00 


860 


00 


202 


00 


25 


00 


2,485 


00 


194 


60 



2,290 40 



To the Commissioners on Fisheries and 
Game, for licenses for hunting and fish- 
ing in 1922: — 

235 resident hunting at $2.00 . 
98 hunting and trapping at $1.50 

1 alien hunting at $15.00 . 
227 resident fishermen at $1.00 

3 alien fishermen at $2.00. 



Less city clerk's fees, 564 at $ .15 





470 


00 




147 


00 




15 


00 




227 


00 




6 


00 




865 


00 


5 . 


84 


60 



780 40 



To the city treasurer, monthly: — 

City clerk's fees for issuing and re- 
cording dog licenses, 969 at $ .20 . . 193 80 
City clerk's fees for issuing and re- 
cording fishing and hunting licenses, 

564 at $ .15 84 60 

All the receipts above specified except 
for dog licenses and fishing and hunt- 
ing licenses 5,704 22 

Total payments . 



5,982 62 
9,053 42 



Balance, January 1, 1923, being for dog 
licenses issued in December, 1922: — 

2 males at $2.00 . . . $4 00 
Less city clerk's fee paid to 
the city treasurer 2 at 
$ .20 .... 40 



3 60 



9,057 02 



232 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Licenses and Permits. 

Besides the licenses mentioned in the foregoing list of 
receipts, licenses and permits have been granted by the Board 
of Aldermen, without charge as follows : — 

Children under fifteen to take part in entertainments 6 

Parade in streets, with music, etc 3 

To hold religious services in streets and squares . . 3 

To suspend rope across street 2 

Newsboys 8 

To move buildings through streets 10 



Births. 
1922. 

Number of births reported by physicians and midwives 
for 1922. 

Males ...... . ' 997 

Females 906 

A canvas of the city is at present being made under the 
direction of the city clerk as required by section 5, chapter 29, 
of the Revised Laws, to ascertain the facts required for record 
relative to children born during the year. 

As the information derived from such canvas will not be 
available in time sufficient for its incorporation in this report, 
a statement in full of the births of 1922 will be given in the 
city clerk's report for the year 1923. 



1921 

The following is a statement in full of the births for 1921. 

Number of births (exclusive of still births) in Somerville 

in 1921 registered 1,883 

Less than previous year 36 

Males ... ..... 952 

Females 931 

1,883 

Born of American parents 851 

Born of foreign parents 635 

Born of American father and foreign mother . 183 

Born of foreign father and American mother . . 200 
Born of American mother and father of unknown 

nationality 10 

Born of foreign mother and father of unknown 

nationalty 4 

1,883 



CITY CLERK. 



233 



Number of stillbirths in Somerville in 1921 as registered 
Number of births in other places in 1921 registered . 
Number of cases of twins 



83 

613 

21 



Marriages. 



Number of intention certificates issued in 1922 

Less than previous year 

Marriages registered 

Less than previous year 

Both parties American 

Both parties foreign 

American groom and foreign bride 
Foreign groom and American bride 



First marriage of . 
Second marriage of . 
Third marriage of . 
Fourth marriage of . 







1,214 






64 






1,229 






50 


798 






191 






119 






121 








1,229 


c'pls 


2,152 






291 






14 






1 








1,229 


c'pls 



Deaths 



(Exclusive of still-births) 



Number of deaths in Somerville in 1922 
More than previous year . 

Males 

Females 



Under ten years of age . 
10 and under 20 years of age 
20 and under 30 years of age 
30 and under 40 years of age 
40 and under 50 years of age 
50 and under 60 years of age 
60 and under 70 years of age 
70 and under 80 years of age 
80 and under 90 years of age 
90 years of age and over 



Age of oldest person deceased . . 98 years 

Born in Somerville 

Born in other places in the United States . 



Of foreign birth 
Birthplace unknown 



489 
530 



190 
31 

28 

39 

72 

119 

204 

209 

94 

33 



195 
461 
361 

2 



1,019 
33 



1,019 



1,019 



1,019 



234 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Number of deaths in January . 








112 


Number of deaths in February 








118 


Number of deaths in March . 








91 


Number of deaths in April 








75 


Number of deaths in May 








86 


Number of deaths in June 








80 


Number of deaths in July 








63 


Number of deaths in August . 








65 


Number of deaths in September 








47 


Number of deaths in October . 








90 


Number of deaths in November 








81 


Number of deaths in December 








111 



1,019 



The number of still-births during the year was fifty-six. 
In addition to the above 271 deaths which occurred elsewhere 
were recorded in Sonierville, almost the entire number of per- 
sons deceased having been residents of this city. 



CITY CLERK. 



235 



ASSESSED POLLS AND REGISTERED VOTERS. 









As- 


Registered Voters. 








Re- 


Re- 


















sessed 






vised 


vised 


Add- 


Add- 






1 


Ward 


Per. 


Polls, 
April 


Nov. 
23 


Nov. 
23 


Lists 
of 


Lists 
of 


ed in 
Julv 


ed in 
July 


Nov. 

7, 


Nov. 

7, 


Voted 
Nov. 








1, 


1921 
Men 


1921 
Women 


July 


Julv 


1922 


1922 


19i'2 


1922 


7, 








1922 


15, 
1922 


15, 

1922 


Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


1922 














Men 


Women 












Ward 


1 


Pet. 1 


1,626 


801 


509 


705 


471 


96 


38 


810 


563 


1063 


'* 


1 


2 


1,141 


601 


389 


527 


340 


83 


49 


597 


391 


695 


" 


1 


3 


593 


312 


175 


286 


157 


26 


18 


318 


194 


387 




1 


4 


701 


211 


100 


186 


95 


25 


5 


205 


106 


246 




4,061 


1,934 


1,173 


1.704 


1063 


230 


110 


1,930 


1.254 


2,391 


Ward 


2 


Pet. 1 


1,122 


368 


184 


329 


166 


39 


18 


366 


187 


397 


** 


2 


2 


1.895 


844 


527 


763 


494 


81 


33 


882 


587 


1,045 




2 


3 


871 


381 


200 


356 


190 


25 


10 


403 


215 


422 




3,888 


1,593 


911 


1,448 


850 


145 


61 


1,651 


989 


1,864 


Ward 


8 


Pet. 1 


1,430 


925 


720 


827 


643 


98 


77 


924 


732 


1,245 




3 


2 


1,360 


812 


638 


736 


581 


76 


57 


835 


649 


1,122 




2,790 


1,737 


1,358 


1,563 


1,224 


174 


134 


1,759 


1,381 


2,367 


Ward 


4 


Pet. 1 


1,468 


849 


615 


791 


579 


58 


36 


889 


672 


1,132 




4 


2 


1,444 


782 


585 


692 


505 


90 


80 


798 


611 


1,044 




2,912 


1,631 


1,200 


1,483 


1,084 


148 


116 


1.687 


1,283 


2,176 


Ward 


5 


Pet. 1 


1,563 


933 


801 


864 


752 


69 


49 


983 


896 


1.447 




5 


2 


1,218 


735 


552 


675 


507 


60 


45 


746 


584 


1,032 




5 


3 


1.095 


654 


463 


591 


415 


63 


48 


679 


528 


946 




3,876 


2,322 


1,816 


2,130 


1,674 


192 


142 


2,408 


2,008 


3,425 


Ward 


6 


Pet. 1 


1,229 


665 


479 


616 


446 


49 


33 


693 


513 


914 


** 


6 


2 


1,468 


739 


390 


660 


351 


79 


39 


738 


416 


832 




6 


3 


1,033 


605 


478 


566 


431 


39 


47 


643 


463 


875 




6 


4 


1,318 


898 


616 


810 


548 


88 


68 


893 


663 


1.199 




5,048 


2,907 


1,963 


2,652 


1,776 


255 


187 


2,967 


2,055 


3.820 


Ward 


7 


Pet. 1 


1,151 


814 


628 


751 


584 


63 


44 


811 


669 


1,184 




7 


2 


1,468 


863 


701 


795 


624 


68 


77 


901 


731 


1.253 




7 


3 


1,693 


969 


695 


898 


641 


71 


54 


1011 


735 


1.319 




7 


4 


1,179 


740 


572 


697 


543 


43 


29 


761 


613 


1,062 




7 


5 


929 


579 


439 


542 


429 


37 


10 


614 


482 


826 




6,420 


3,965 


3,035 


3,683 


2 821 


282 


214 


4,098 


3,212 


5,644 


City 


28,995 


16,089 


11,456 


14,663 


10,492 


1.426 


964 


16.500 


12,182 


21,687 



236 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



ELECTIONS. 



The following is a statement of the votes cast, in the several 
wards of the city, for the candidates for the various offices, and on 
various questions, at the State Election held November 7, 1922. 



Candidate. 


Party. 






Wards 












1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


Total. 


GOVERNOR. 




















Charming H. Cox 
John F. Fitzgerald 
Henry Hess 
Walter S. Hutchins 
John B. Lewis 
Michael Flynn, 


Republican 
Democratic 
Socialist Labor 
Socialist 
Prohibition 


915 

1407 
13 
13 
13 


266 

1563 
1 

I 


1271 

1038 

3 

7 

22 


1183 

921 

7 

11 

17 


1793 

1533 

9 

11 

27 


2069 

1583 

17 

26 

41 

1 


; 3877 

1528 

15 

31 

101 


11374 

1 9573 

65 

108 

225 

1 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR. 


• 
















John F. Doherty 
Alvan T. Fuller 
Oscar Kinsalis 
Thomas Nicholson 
Richard Pigott 
Jos. E. Warner 


Democratic 
Republican 

Socialist Labor 
Socialist 


1120 

1158 

13 

14 


1283 

469 

12 

7 


805 
1483 

7 
8 


665 

1390 

7 

20 


1141 

2106 

9 

22 


1137 

2489 

16 

27 

1 

1 


1038 

4343 

25 

35 


7189 

13438 

89 

133 

I 

1 


SECRETARY. 




















Frederic W. Cook 
Albert S. Coolidge 
James Hayes 
Charles H. McGlue 
Herman Pohl 


Republican 
Socialis 
Socialist Labor 
Democratic 


1231 

15 

21 

959 


519 
18 

11 
1126 


1585 

14 

8 

665 


1479 
23 
13 

540 


2226 

19 

17 

983 


2595 

41 

26 

996 

1 


4568 

57 

29 

769 


14203 

187 

125 

6038 

1 


TREASURER, 




















James Jackson 
Patrick H. Loftus 
Dennis F. Reagan 
Joseph E. Venne 
Annie Pohl 


Republican 
Socialist Labor 
Socialist 
Democratic 


1084 
24 
29 

i038 


377 

18 

28 

1165 


1410 
14 

27 
738 


1380 

12 

32 

568 


2024 
23 
28 

1089 


2370 
30 
81 

1038 
1 


4329 

38 

53 

863 


12974 

159 

278 

6499 

1 


AUDITOR. 




















John Aiken 
Alonzo B. Cook 
Alice E. Cram 
Edith M. Williams 


Socialist Labor 

Republican 

Democratic 

Socialist 


28 
1013 
1063 

54 


15 

350 

1181 

20 


28 

1230 

860 

22 


33 

1245 

664 

34 


39 
1813 
1249 

32 


46 
2149 
1234 

47 


61 
3966 
1151 

50 


250 
11766 

7402 
259 


ATTORNEY GENERAL 


















Joseph Bearak 
Jay R. Benton 
David Craig 
John E. Swift 


Socialist 
Republican 
Socialist Labor 
Democratic 


32 

1010 

25 

1001 


20 

317 

15 

1110 


23 
1294 

34 
1181 


31 

1283 

26 

625 


34 

1895 

20 

801 


46 
2251 

75 
1237 


58 
4108 

51 
1071 


244 

12158 

246 

7026 



CITY CLERK. 



237 





Wards. 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


Total. 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS. 


















Washington Cook Independent 
William A. Gaston Democratic 
Henry Cabot Lodge Republican 
John A. Nicholls 

(Prohibition Progressive) 
John W. Sherman Socialist 
William E. Weeks Progressive 
John A. Nicholls 


17 
1403 

826 

35 
11 
14 


11 

1477 
274 

18 

10 

2 


16 
1018 
1146 

108 

7 
8 


13 

907 

1061 

104 
14 
13 


19 

1477 
1657 

153 
14 
15 


23 

1589 
1870 

155 
36 

18 

1 


49 
1634 
3479 

373 
35 
29 


148 

9505 

10213 

946 

127 

99 

1 


CONGRESSMAN 


















Arthur D. Healey Democratic 
Charles L. Underhill Republican 
Fred P. Greenwood 
Fred W. Wolffer 


1260 
951 


1410 
285 


1013 
1253 


805 
1233 


1403 
1832 


1514 

2094 

1 

1 


1390 
3929 


8795 

11577 

1 

1 


COUNCILLOR, 


















Charles L. Burrill Republican 
Francis Q. Harrington 


1234 


572 


1465 


1484 


2203 
1 


2607 


4405 


13970 

1 


SENATOR, 










■ 








Maurice F. Ahearn Democratic 
Charles M. Austin Republican 


1107 
1065 


1308 
326 


888 
1283 


674 
1289 


1241 
1921 


1337 
2142 


1203 
3985 


7758 
12011 


REPRESENTATIVES IN 
GENERAL COURT 

23RD DISTRICT (3) 


















William J. Bell Republican 
Edward L. Hagan Democratic 
David Jj Lanigan Democratic 
James J. Morrissey Democratic 
Francis W. K. SmithRepublican 
Walter H. Snow Republican 


1020 

1105 

893 

872 
908 
958 




1233 
737 

800 

604 

1210 

1188 


1302 

630 

439 

436 

1123 

1228 


1983 
1246 
996 
898 
1704 
1709 






5538 








3718 








3128 








2810 








4945 








5083 










REPKESENTATP7ES IN 
GENERAL COURT 

24TH DISTRICT (3) 


















E. Agnes Blood Democratic 




1238 
832 
277 
283 

1083 








1155 
2408 
1941 
1893 
1349 
1 


1117 
4009 
3816 
3717 
936 




Warren C. Daggett Republican 










3510 
7249 


Hiram N. Dearborn Republican 










Wilbur F. Lewis Republican 










6034 


Perry F. Nagle Democratic 










5893 


Alfred Pigott 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER. 










3368 










1 


Erson B. Barlow Republican 


1198 


567 


1504 


1445 


2133 


2590 


4307 


13744 



238 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



ASSOCIATE 
COMMISSIONERS. 

Sherman H. Fletcher Republican 
John M. Keyes Republican 

Sydney Hayden 
Elmer E. Beacham 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 



Arthur K. Reading 
James C. Reilly 



Republican 
Democratic 



CLERK OF COURTS. 

RALPH N. Smith Republican 

REGISTER OF DEEDS. 
Thomas Leighton, Jr. Republican 



COUNTY TREASURER 
(to fill vacancy) 

Charles E. Hatfield Republican 
Chas. Ponzi 

REFERENDUM QUESTION 1 
—AMENDMENT TO CONSTI- 
TUTION. 

SHALL AN AMENDMENT TO 
THE CONSTITUTION RELA- 
TIVE TO ROLL CALLS IN THE 
GENERAL COURT ON THE 
ADOPTION OF PREAMBLES 
OF EMERGENCY LAWS, 

WHICH RECEIVED IN A 
JOINT SESSION OF THE TWO 
HOUSES HELD MAY 27, 1920, 
169 VOTES IN THE AFFIRMA- 
TIVE AND 15 IN THE NEGA- 
TIVE, AND AT A JOINT SES- 
SION OF THE TWO HOUSES 
HELD MAY 24,1921, RECEIVED 
261 VOTES IN THE AFFIRMA- 
TIVE AND 1 IN THE NEGA- 
TIVE, BE APPROVED? 

Number of "Yes" votes, 
Number of "No" votes, 



Wards. 



1153 
1065 



505 
504 



974 
1272 



1281 



1295 



1259 



Total. 



1374 
1273 



1349 
1243 



290 
1357 



622 



628 



592 



865 
738 



1185 
1017 



1566 



1540 



1282 
699 



1496 



2032 

1950 

1 

1 



1801 
1377 



2249 



2355 
2266 



3968 
3758 



1498 2258 



2022 
1542 



2676 



2683 



3631 
1618 



4460 



4430 



12736 

12059 

1 

1 



11186 

8882 



14350 



14332 



1507 



1474 



2214 
1 



2640 



4393 



14079 
1 



426 
691 



1051 
564 



972 
509 



1574 
880 



1774 

885 



3047 
1006 



9709 
5273 



CITY CLERK. 



239 



REFERENDUM QUESTION 2. 
SHALL A LAW (CHAPTER 368 
OP THE ACTS OF 1921) WHICH 
PROVIDES THAT ANY VOL- 
UNTARY ASSOCIATION COM- 
POSED OF FIVE OR MORE 
PERSONS, AND NOT SUBJECT 
TO THE FIRST ELEVEN SEC- 
TIONS OF CHAPTER 182 OF 
THE GENERAL LAWS, MAY 
SUE OR BE SUED IN ITS 
COMMON NAME, THAT IN 
ANY SUIT AGAINST SUCH AS- 
SOCIATION SERVICE MAY BE 
MADE UPON CERTAIN DES- 
IGNATED OFFICERS THERE- 
OF, AND THAT THE SEPA- 
RATE PROPERTY OF ANY 
MEMBER THEREOF SHALL 
BE EXEMPT FROM ATTACH- 
MENT OR EXECUTION IN 
ANY SUCH SUIT, WHICH LAW 
WAS PASSED IN THE HOUSE 
OF REPRESENTATIVES BY A 
VOTE OF 124 IN THE AFFIR- 
MATIVE TO 84 IN THE NEGA- 
TIVE, AND IN THE SENATE 
BY A MAJORITY NOT RE- 
CORDED, AND WAS AP- 
PROVED BY HIS EXCELLEN- 
CY THE GOVERNOR, BE AP- 
PROVED? 

Number of "Yes" votes, 
Number of "No" votes. 



REFERENDUM QUESTION 3. 
SHALL A LAW (CHAPTER 438 
OF THE ACTS OF 1921) WHICH 
PROVIDES THAT IT SHALL 
BE UNLAWFUL FOR ANY 
PERSON TO EXHIBIT OR DIS- 
PLAY PUBLICLY IN THIS 
COMMONWEALTH ANY MO- 
TION PICTURE FILM UNLESS 
SUCH FILM HAS BEEN SUB- 
MITTED TO AND APPROVED 
BY THE COMMISSIONER OF 
PUBLIC SAFETY, WHO MAY, 
SUBJECT TO THE APPEAL 
GIVEN BY THE ACT, DISAP- 
PROVE ANY FILM OR PART 
THEREOF WHICH IS OB- 
SCENE, INDECENT, IMMOR- 
AL, INHUMAN OR TENDS TO 
DEBASE OR CORRUPT MOR- 
ALS OR INCITE TO CRIME, 
AND MAY, SUBJECT TO THE 
APPROVAL OF THE GOVER- 
NOR AND COUNCIL, MAKE 
RULES AND REGULATIONS 
FOR THE ENFORCEMENT OF 
THE ACT, WHICH LAW WAS 



Wards. 



722 
928 



Total. 



282 
86S 



972 
728 



821 
715 



1435 
1054 



1551 
1185 



2813 
1315 



8596 
6793 



240 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Candidate 



Party 



PASSED IN THE HOUSE OF 
REPRESENTATIVES BY A 
MAJORITY NOT RECORDED, 
AND IN THE SENATE BY 21 
VOTES IN THE AFFIRMATIVE 
TO 16 VOTES IN THE NEGA- 
TIVE, AND WAS APPROVED 
BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE 
GOVERNOR, BE APPROVED? 

Number of "YES" votes 
Number of "NO" votes 

REFERENDUM QUESTION 4. 
SHALL A LAW (CHAPTER 427 
OF THE ACTS OF 1922) EN- 
ACTED TO ENFORCE IN MAS- 
SACHUSETTS THE EIGH- 
TEENTH AMENDMENT TO 
THE CONSTITUTION OF THE 
UNITED STATES, WHICH 
PROVIDES THAT EXCEPT AS 
AUTHORIZED BY THE ACT, 
THE MANUFACTURE, SALE, 
BARTER, TRANSPORTATION, 
IMPORTATION, EXPORTA- 

TION, DELIVERY, FURNISH- 
ING OR POSSESSING OF ANY 
INTOXICATING LIQUOR, AS 
DEFINED IN THE ACT. SHALL 
BE A CRIMINAL OFFENCE 
AND BE PUNISHED IN THE 
MANNER PRESCRIBED BY 
THE ACT, WHICH LAW WAS 
PASSED IN THE HOUSE OF 
REPRESENTATIVES BY A 
MAJORITY OF 134 IN THE AF- 
FIRMATIVE TO 68 IN THE 
NEGATIVE, AND IN THE 
SENATE BY A MAJORITY OF 
28 IN THE AFFIRMATIVE TO 
9 IN THE NEGATIVE, AND WAS 
APPROVED BY HIS EXEL- 
LENCY THE GOVERNOR, BE 
APPROVED? 

Number of "YES" votes 
Number of "NO" votes 

REFERENDUM QUESTION 5. 
SHALL A LAW (CHAPTER 459 
OF THE ACTS OF 1922) WHICH 
PROVIDES THAT' A DISTRICT 
ATTORNEY SHALL BE A 
MEMBER OF THE BAR OF 
THE COMMONWEALTH, 

PASSED IN THE HOUSE OF 
REPRESENTATIVES BY A 
MAJORITY NOT RECORDED, 
AND IN THE SENATE BY A 
MAJORITY NOT RECORDED, 
AND APPROVED BY HIS EX- 
CELLENCY THE GOVERNOR, 
BE APPROVED? 

Number of "YES" votes 
rsumber of "NO" votes 



Wards, 



484 
1527 



244 609 
1266 1469 



Total. 



490 910 
1406 2120 



1008 
2362 



1860 
3225 



5605 
13375 



700 
1293 



316 1032 
1144 i 1009 



817 1442 1587 
1082 I 1549 1775 



896 I 379 1197 1115 
863 | 976 683 653 



2923 
2083 



8817 
9935 



1813 2041 
987 1114 



3624 11156 
1021 6297 



CITY CLERK. 



241 



Liquor License Question. 

The following is a statement of the votes, during the sev- 
eral years of its submission to the people, on the question of 
granting licenses for the sale of intoxicating liquors, in this 
city, together with the number of registered voters and the 
estimated population for each year : — 











Registered 


Estimated 


Year. 


Yes. 
979 


No. 


Blank. 


Voters. 


Population. 


1881 


1,222 




3,678 


26,000 


1882 


627 


1,159 




3,778 


26,500 


1883 


767 


1,343 




4,407 


27,000 


1884 


806 


1,709 




4,470 


28,000 


1885 


428 


1,604 




3,969 


*29,992 


1886 


214 


1,321 




4,089 


32,000 


1887 


555 


2,427 




4,574 


34,000 


1888 


744 


2,456 




5,399 


36,000 


1889 


635 


1,706 


335 


5,286 


39,000 


1890 


999 


2,282 


409 


5,556 


*40,117 


1891 


1,054 


2,598 


279 


5,938 


43,000 


1892 


1,427 


3,288 


347 


7,587 


46,000 


1893 


1,547 


2,654 


218 


7,943 


48,000 


1894 


1,098 


2,869 


246 


8,007 


50,000 


1895 


1,854 


4,708 


459 


8,410 


*52,200 


1896 


1,466 


3,680 


332 


9,379 


54,000 


1897 


1,626 


3,815 


486 


8,925 


56,000 


1898 


1,595 


3,501 


486 


8,657 


57,500 


1899 


1,892 


3,340 


374 


8,838 


60,000 


1900 


1,660 


3,427 


321 


9,620 


*61,643 


1901 


1,579 


3,295 


374 


9,499 


63,500 


1902 


1,645 


3,242 


360 


10,100 


65,000 


1903 


2,248 


4,410 


550 


11,346 


67,000 


1904 


2,022 


4,338 


447 


11,682 


69,500 


1905 


2,483 


4,660 


531 


11,340 


*69,272 


1906 


2,193 


5,204 


582 


11,571 


70,000 


1907 


1,735 


4,591 


459 


11,558 


74,000 


1908 


1,780 


4,760 


491 


12,777 


75,500 


1909 


1,830 


4,601 


530 


12,479 


75,500 


1910 


1,544 


3,968 


365 


12,522 


*77,236 


1911 


2,193 


4,841 


492 


13,226 


80,000 


1912 


2,421 


6,182 


546 


13,854 


81,000 


1913 


2,348 


6,431 


550 


13,417 


82,000 


1914 


2,178 


5,535 


488 


13,404 


85,000 


1915 


1,705 


5,262 


379 


13,805 


*86,854 


1916 


1,100 


4,158 ■ 


271 


14,500 


88,000 


1917 


1,291 


3,457 


232 


13,826 


90,000 


1918 


690 


1,935 


161 


13,477 


90,500 


1919 


2,777 


2,297 


261 


14,810 


91,000 


1920 








27,307 


93,091 


1921 


5,143 


8,751 


2,992 


27,545 


95,000 


1922 










96,000 


•Censi 


is. 











242 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



ORDINANCES. 

Somerville, January 1, 1923. 

The following ordinances have been adopted since the 
printing of the annual reports, for the year 1921 : — 

ORDINANCE NO. 97. 

An Ordinance Amending Ordinance No* 96 Relative to One Way 

Streets. 

Be it ordained by the board of aldermen of the city of Somerville as 
follows: — 

Section 1. Section 1 of Ordinance No. 96 enititled "An Ordinance 
Relative to One Way Streets" is hereby amended by striking out the 
words "or along any portion of Franklin street between Washington 
street and Broadway except in a north-easterly direction" and substi- 
tuting therefore the words "or along any portion of Franklin street 
between Oliver street and Broadway except in a northeasterly direction, 
also along any portion of Franklin street between Washington street 
and Oliver street during a period from eight o'clock in the forenoon 
of each day until five o'clock in the forenoon of the following day 
except in a northeasterly direction." 

Section 2. Whoever violates any provision of this ordinance shall 
be liable to a penalty of not exceeding twenty dollars for each offense. 

Section 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 



ORDINANCE NO. 98. 

An Ordinance to Amend Ordinance No. 91 entitled "An Ordinance 
Relative to the Fire Department." 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Somerville as 
follows: — 

Section 1. The first paragraph of Section 1 of Ordinance No. 91 
entitled "An Ordinance Relative to the Fire Department" is hereby 
amended by striking out the last sentence of said paragraph, namely 
"The to district chiefs shall each perform the duties of a captain," 
so that said first paragraph shall read as follows: — 

The fire department shall consist of a chief engineer, a deputy 
chief, two district chiefs, a master mechanic, and as many other offi- 
cers and members as the Board of Aldermen shall from time to time 
determine. 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved March 16, 1922. 



CITY CLERK. 243 



ORDINANCE NO. 99. 

An Ordinance Fixing License Fee for Purchase and Sale of Second 
Hand Motor Vehicles and Parts Thereof. 

Be it ordained by the board of aldermen of the City of Somerville, as 
follows: — 

Section 1, Ordinance 89 is hereby amended by striking out Section 
1, and inserting in place thereof the following: 

Section 1. The fee for each class of license provided for by 
section 57 to 69 inclusive of Chapter 140 of General Laws is hereby 
fixed at the sum of $25.00. 

Section 2. This Ordinance shall take effect June 5, 1922. 

Approved July 28, 1922. 



ORDINANCE NO. 100. 

An Ordinance Relative to Examination of Structures For Use By 

Public. 

Be it ordained by the board of aldermen of the City of Somerville, as 
folloivs: — 

Section 1. The Commissioner of Public Buildings shall examine 
into the safety of all grandstands, merry-go-rounds, ferris wheels and 
other structures intended for use by the public in connection with 
any exhibition, show, game or other amusement, and no person shall 
cause or allow such a structure to be used by the public until a permit 
has been given in writing for such use by the commissioner. 

Section 2. Whoever violates any provision o fthis ordinance shall 
be liable to a penalty of not exceeding twenty dollars for each offense. 
Section 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved December 15, 1922. 



ORDINANCE NO. 101. 

An Ordinance Relative to Making Chester Avenue a One Way Street. 

Be it ordained by the board of aldermen of the City of Somerville, as 
follows: — 

Section 1. No person shall cause or allow a vehicle other than 
a vehicle propelled by hand to pass along any portion of Chester 
avenue except in a westerly direction. 

Section 2. This ordinance shall not apply to street railway cars. 
Section 3. Whoever violates any provision of this ordinance shall 
be liable to a penalty of not exceeding twenty dollars for each offense. 
Section 4. This ordinance shall take effect January 1, 1923. 

Approved December 20, 1922. 



244 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1922 



Mayor. 

John M. Webster, 76 Boston Street 

Board of Aldermen. 

President, Enoch B. Robertson 
Vice-President, Waldo D. Phelps 



ward ONE 

Lym.au A. Hodgdon, Alderman-at-Large 

William F. Burns 

John R. Spiers 

ward two 

Robert C. Harris, Alderman-at-Large . 

Joseph A. Haley 

John Joseph Hoban .... 

ward three 

William C. Abbott, Alderman-at-Large . 

George A. Berry 

Thomas D. Mitchell .... 



8 Indiana Avenue 
21 Illinois Avenue 
52 Franklin Street 



12 Dimick Street 

7 Linden Street 

39 Mansfield Street 



73 Avon Street 
60 Prescott Street 
25 Warren Avenue 



WARD FOUR 



Waldo D. Phelps, Alderman-at-Large 

John S. Smith, Jr 

Henry F. Welch 



64 Flint Street 

52 Sydney Street 

56 Otis Street 



WARD FIVE 



Fred Allen, Alderman-at-Large 
J. Freeman Saville . 
Francis W. K. Smith 



121 Central Street 

64 Sycamore Street 

85 Central Street 



WARD SIX 



Enoch B. Robertson, Alderman-at-Large 

Albert E. Hughes 

William M. Morrison 



39 Highland Road 

262 Highland Avenue 

97 Rogers Avenue 



CITY CLERK. 245 

WARD SEVEN 

Hiram N. Dearborn, Alderman-at-Large . 86 Electric Avenue 

Emerson J. Coldwell 27 Hall Avenue 

Arthur F. Mason 18 Hall Avenue 

City Clerk, Jason M. Carson 

Assistant City Clerk, Henry J. Allen 

City Messenger, Fred E. Hanley 

Regular meetings, second and fourth Thursday evenings 
of each month, at 8 o'clock, except when such Thursday is a 
holiday, in which case the meeting is held on the preceding 
Tuesday evening. 



Standing Committees of the Board of Aldermen. 

Electric Lines and Lights — Aldermen Burns, Abbott, Allen, Ma- 
son, and Hoban. 

Finance — The President, Aldermen Mason, Haley, Phelps, Hodg- 
don, Smith of Ward Five and Mitchell. 

Legislative Matters — Aldermen Haley, Smith of Ward Five, Mit- 
chell, Smith of Ward Four and Dearborn. 

Licenses and Permits — Aldermen Harris, Smith of Ward Four, 
Dearborn, Abbott, Burns, Saville and Morrison. 

Public Property — Aldermen Smith of Ward Five, Dearborn, 
Welch, Morrison and Spiers. 

Public Safety — Aldermen Phelps, Hodgdon, Harris, Hughes and 
Coldwell. 

Public Service — Aldermen Berry, Allen, Smith of Ward Four, 
Burns, Haley, Hughes and Mason. 

Public Works— Aldermen Coldwell, Saville, Spiers, Hughes, Hoban, 
Berry and Welch. 

School Committee. 

Chirman, Herbert Cholerton 

Vice-Chairman, Walter I. Chapman 

Members. 
Hon. John M. Webster Mayor, (ex officio) 76 Boston Street 

Enoch B. Robertson, President of the Board of Aldermen, (ex-officio) 

39 Highland Road 

ward one 

Francis J. Fitzpatrick 2 Austin Street 

Julia A. Crowley 53 Franklin Street 

WARD TWO 

Daniel H. Bradley .... . 1,9 Concord Avenue 

Christopher Muldoon, Jr 88 Concord Avenue 



246 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



WARD THREE 

Charles W. Boyer . . . * . 
Oscar W. Codding 

WARD FOUR 

Katherine C. Coveney .... 
Richard L. Rice, resigned Sept. 25, 1922. 
Edward I. Tripp, elected Nov. 14, 1922. 



66 Avon Street 
59 Vinal Avenue 



73 Marshall Street 

296^ Broadway 

21 Wigglesworth Street 



Harry M. Stoodley . 
Minnie S. Turner . 



WARD FIVE 



283 Highland Avenue 
64 Hudson Street 



Walter I. Chapman 
Walter Frye Turner 



ward six 



18A Central Street 
15 Highland Road 



Herbert Cholerton 
Paul 0. Curtis . 



WARD SEVEN 



94 College Avenue 
41 Mason Street 



Superintendent and Secretary — Charles S. Clark 

Regular meetings last Monday evening of each month, 
except July and August, when none are held, and December, 
when meeting is held on the Friday preceding the first Mon- 
day in January. 

Assessors. 

Fred E. Warren, Chairman (term expiree 1923.) 

Winsor L. Snow (term expires 1924). 

Harry Van Iderstine (term expires 1923). 

J. Robert Fenelon (term expires 1925). 

David B. Armstrong (term expires 1924). 



Assistant Assessors. 



Fred B. Clapp. 
Lawrence J. Ward. 
Joseph O. Knox 



John J. McCarthy 
John M. Nangle. 
Leonard C. Spinney. 



Board of Health. 

Robert M. Lavender (term expires 1924) (Resigned) 

Warren C. Blair, (term expires 1923) 

John E. Gillis,, M. D., (term expires 1923) (Resigned) 

Cheslie A. C. Richardson, M. D., Chairman (term expires 1924) 

Wesley M. Goff (term expires 1923) 

Clerk — Laurence S. Howard 

Agent — Geokge 1. Canfield 

Medical Inspector — Frank L. Morse, M. D. 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions — Charles M. Berry 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar — Herbert E. Bowman 



CITY CLERK. 247 

Overseers of the Poor. 

Feed E. Durgin, Chairman (term expires 1923). 

Michael Coll, Vice Chairman (term expires 1924) 

George G. Brayley, (term expires 1925) 

Agent — William E. Copithorne. 

Warden City Home — J. Foster Colquhoun. 

Matron City Home — Catherine Colquhoun. 

Planning Board. 

William F. Riley, Chairman (term expires 1926). 

David J. Kelley, Secretary (term expires 1924). 

Benjamin J. Surrett (term expires 1925) 

John Williamson (term expires 1927) 

George J. Rauh, (term expires 1923). 

Registrars of Voters. 

Edwin D. Sibley, Chairman (term expires 1924). 

Douglass B. Foster (term expiree 1923). 

Charles Leo Shea (term expires 1925) 

Jason M. Carson, City Clerk. 

Public Library Trustees. 

Thomas M. Durell, Chairman (term expires 1925). 

J. Frank Wellington (term expires 1923). 

Frederick W. Parker (term expires 1924). 

William L. Barber (term expires 1925). 

Charles L. Noyes (term expires 1923). 

Herbert E. Buffum (term expires 1923). 

Giles W. Bryant (term expires 1924). 

David H. Fulton (term expires 1924). 

Frank M. Barnard (term expires 1925). 

Librarian and Secretary — George H. Evans. 

Public Welfare and Recreation Commission. 

Ernest W. Bailey (term expires 1923) 

Sophie C. Bateman (term expires 1923) 

Charles S. Clark (term expires 1923) 

William E. Copithorne (term expires 1923) 

George L. Dudley (term expires 1923) 

Florence B. Hamilton (term expires 1924) 

William S. Howe (term expires 1924) 

Margaret L. Maguire (term expires 1923) 

Mary M. McGann (term expires 1924) 

Annie M. Smith (term expires 1924) 

City Clerk. 

Jason M. Carson 
Assistant City Clerk, Henry J. Allen 

City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 
Joseph S. Pike. 



248 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

City Messenger. 
Fred E. Hanley. 

Mayor's Secretary. 
Sumner M. Teele 

City Solicitor. 
Frank W. Kaan. 

City Auditor. 
Howard E. Wemyss. 

City Engineer. 
Ernest W. Bailey. 

Commissioner of Streets. - 
Asa B. Prichard. 

Commissioner of Public Buildings and Inspector of Buildings. 

George L. Dudley. 

Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights. 

Walter I. Fuller. 

Water Commissioner. 
Frank E. Merrill. 

Superintendent of Sanitary Department. 
Edgar T. Mayhew. 

Clerk cf Committees 
Richard A. Keyes 

Chief of Police. 
Charles A. Kendall. 

Chief Engineer of the Fire Department. 
Sewall M. Rich. 

City Physician. 
Frank E. Bateman 

Inspector of Plumbing. 
Duncan C. Greene. 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar. 
Herbert E. Bowman. 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions. 
Charles M. Bebby. 



CITY CLERK. 249 

Inspector of Petroleum. 
Sewall M. Rich. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

Benjamin S. Abbott. 

Registration Clerk, City Laborers 
Florence A. Cook 

Fence Viewers. 

Charles M. Berry, 

Howard Lowell, 

Agent of Military and State Aid and Soldiers' Relief and Burial Agent 

Benjamin S. Abbott. 

Constables. 

Maurice F. Ahearn. Fred E. Hanlet. 

Charles M. Austin. James M. Harmon. 

Charles W. F. Bennett. Fred W. Jackson. 

Eugene A. Carter. Harry E. Jackson. 

Winslow W. Coffin. Frank B. Karcher 

William E. Copithorne. Charles A. Kendall. 

Albion B. Crocker. Elbridge G. Lavender. 

Thomas Damery. Edward E. Marsh. 

Charles L. Ellis. John A. Ray. 

Arthur L. Gilman. John F. Scannell. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 251 



SOMERVILLE WATER WORKS. 



SOMERVILLE, MIDDLESEX CO., MASSACHUSETTS. 

Settled, when part of Charlestown, 1630. 

(Home of Colonial Governor John Winthrop). 

Incorporated a town, 1842. 

Established a city, 1872. 



Location: Somerville City Hall (near centre of the city) is 2% miles 
northerly from State House, in Boston. 

Greatest extent of the City north and south about 4.2 miles. 
Greatest extent of the City east and west about 2.1 miles. 
Elevation Highland avenue at City Hall 105 feet above mean low 
water. 

Lowest building elevation in the city 13 feet. 

Highest building elevation in the city 145 feet. 

Area of city, including land and water, about 4.22 square miles. . 

Land, 2,461.50 acres; water and marsh, 238.50 acres. 

Population, 1920 census, 93,033. 

Present population, estimated, 96,000. 

Entire population on line of pipe and supplied with water. 



Water works owned by City of Somerville. 

Construction commenced in 1868. 

Source of supply: Metropolitan system, taking water of the Nashua 

river at Clinton, Mass. 

Range of pressure on street mains: 

Low service 35 to 65 pounds. 

High service 45 to 100 pounds. 



Mayor. 
Hon. John M. Webster 



Water Commissioner. 
Frank E. Mebbill 



Office of the Water Department. 
Room 10, City Hall. 



Department Buildings and Yard. 
Cedar street, near Broadway. 



252 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



ADMINISTRATION OF WATER WORKS 
VESTED AS FOLLOWS: 



1868 — 1871 

SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER COMMITTEE (5) 

Acts 1868; Chap. 202 



1872 — 1890 

SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD (5) 

Acts 1871; Chap. 182 



1891 — 1897 

SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD (3) 

Acts 1890; Chap. 218. 



1898 — 1899 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS (3) 

Acts 1898; Chap. 33 



1900 — 
WATER COMMISSIONER (1) 
Acts 1899; Chap. 240 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



253 



REPORT OF THE WATER COMMISSIONER. 



Office of the Water Commissioner, 

January, 1923. 

To His Honor, the Ma3 r or, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

I present herewith my report for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1922, this being the forty-ninth annual report of the 
water department and my twenty- third as water commission- 
er: 

Revenue and Expenditures. 



Water bills have been issued as follows :- 

"Annual" water charges, amounting to . 
"Additional" water charges, amounting to . 
"Metered" water charges, amounting to . 



Abatements and refunds on above charges 
Changes from "Annual" to "Meter" 

basis, 

Uncollectible 

Other reasons 

Carried forward for collection 



Income from sale of water . 

Receipts; water service assessments 
Receipts; labor and materials sold: — 



$455 23 

75 48 

603 00 

179 55 



$9,674 58 



Misc. accounts charged 

Abatements : 

Uncollectible . $8 87 
Other reasons . 27 81 
Carried forw'd 410 84 



$4,991 15 



447 52 



4,543 63 



Total income of water works . 
This amount was used as follows: — 
For water works purposes : — 

Under Control of the Water Commissioner. 

Works Mainte- 



Water 

nance .... $69,464 05 

Water Works extension . 32,539 92 

Miscellaneous accounts . 4,543 63 



$106,547 60 



$28,121 25 

1,241 06 

241,859 36 

$271,221 67 



1,313 26 



$269,908 41 



14,218 21 
$284,126 62 



$106,547 60 



254 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Brought forward $106,547 60 

Not Under Control of the Water Commissioner. 

Metropolitan water works assessment . $128,207 84 
Maintenance water works buildings . 1,324 84 

$129,532 68 

For other municipal purposes : — 

Not Under Control of the Water Commissioner. 
Surplus $48,046 34 



Total $284,126 62 

In addition to the appropriations from water income to 
other municipal purposes enumerated above, water has been 
furnished without charge to all the city departments that 
have required its use and it is paid for out of the income 
from sale of water. 

Department Receipts and Disbursements. 
WATER MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT. 

Appropriations made by Board of Aldermen . $76,725 00 

Department accounts; receipts . ... 1,255 63 

Water works extension account; receipts . 20,755 75 

Amount expended for labor and materials for 
operation, maintenance, and renewal of 
the water works . ... $69,464 05 

Amount expended for materials used in ex- 
tension of the water works .... 20,755 75 

Miscellaneous accounts . . . . . 4,543 63 

Labor and materials furnished municipal de- 
partments . . . . . . . 1,255 63 

Balance: Unexpended . . . . 2,717 32 



,736 38 $98,736.38 

WATER WORKS EXTENSION ACCOUNT. 

Appropriations made by Board of Aldermen . $35,500 00 

Amount expended for labor and materials used 

in extension of the water works . . $32,539 92 
Balance: unexpended . . . . 2,960 08 



$35,500 00 $35,500 00 



Cost of Water Works. 



The total cost of water works on December 31, 
1921, as represented by the expenditures 
from appropriations for water works ex- 
tension was $1,095,206 73 

Expended during the year 1922, on extension 

account ....... $ 32,639 92 



Total expenditures, December 31, 1922 . $1,127,74$ 65 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



255 



Water Works Income from 1898 and its Distribution. 

The water income and its distribution from 1898 to 1922, 
inclusive, is shown in the following table:- — 



Total water income 
Distribution: — 



$5,949,836 17 



Water Works Account. 

Water works Construction, Renewal, 

Maintenance, Operation and Miscellane- 
ous Accounts $1,540,920 67 

Water bonds 274,000 00 

Interest 86,575 00 

Metropolitan Water Assessments . . 2,405,997 58 

Maintenance Water Works buildings . 9,617 10 



-$4,317,110 35 



Other Municipal Accounts. 

Various municipal departments through* 
specific appropriations and general 
revenue account .... 



$1,632,725 82 
$5,949,836 17 



Water Distribution System — Construction. 

STREET MAINS. 



Approximate number of feet of street mains in the 
city, January 1, 1922, (including hydrant 
branches and blow-offs) . 

Feet of street mains laid in 1922 . 

Feet of hydrant branches laid in 1922 

Feet of blow-off branches laid in 1922 



Total feet of pipe laid 
Feet of pipe removed or replaced . 

Net increase in feet of pipe . 

Total approximate feet of pipe in the city 

Total pipe mileage, approximately . 



7,254 

260 

52 

7,566 
674 



542,780 



6,892 

549,672 

104.1 



The sizes and lengths of pipe laid and discontinued are as 
follows : — 





Feet 


Feet 




Feet 


Feet 


Size 


Daid 


Discontinued 


Size 


Laid 


Discontinued 


%" 








6" 


482 


529 


1" 





11 


8" 


2033 





2" 


87 


124 , 


10" 


2014 





4" 


71 


10 


12" 


2879 






256 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



The pipes constructed and replaced during the year are 
as follows : — 











Feet 


Size 


Constructed : — 


Size of Pipe 


Feet Laid 


Discon- 
tinued 


Discon- 
tinued 


Alewife Brook Parkway 


12" 


1479 






Boston Ave . 


10" 


48 






Corinthian Road 




8" 


242 






Cross St. East 




12" 


40 






Curtis St. 




6" 


23 






Fairfax St. 




8" 


949 






High St. . 




12" 


416 






Kensington Ave. 




12" 


6 






Lewis St. 




10" 

2" 


362 { 

42 J 






Miller St. 




6" 


160 






Murray St. 




6" 


32 






Mystic Ave. 




12" 


382 






Parkdale St. . 




10" 


491 






Pennsylvania Ave 




10" 


166 






Rose St. . 




8" 


8 






Sterling St. . 




8" 


680 






Talbot Ave . 




12" 


72 






Upland Road . 




8" 


154 






Woods Ave 




10" 


947 






Replaced: — 










Bradford Ave . 


2" 


18 


18 


2" 


Chapel Court . 


2" 


22 


11 
11 


1"! 
2" J 


Cottage Circle 


4" 


31 


31 


2" 


Linwood St. . . 


12" 


484 


484 


6" 


Hydrant branches, blow-off 










pipes and water-post con- 










nections . 


, . 




312 


119 





7,566 



674 



Hydrants, Gates etc. 

Number of fire hydrants in city January 1, 

1922 

Number set during year .... 

Number removed during the year . 

Net increase in number of hydrants 



27 
15 



1,182 



12 



Total number of public fire hydrants 
Number of private fire hydrants, January 1, 

1922 

Number added by revision of list 

Total number of private fire hydrants 
receiving their supply from the city 
mains 



1,194 



64 
2 



66 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



257 



Number of gates in city, January 1, 1922 
Number set during the year for streets . 
Number of section gates set . 
Number set on hydrant branches . 
Number set on blow-off branches 
Number set on car-sprinkler connections 

Number of street gates removed 
Number of waterpost gates removed 
Number of blow-off gates removed . 



Net increase in numlber of gates 
Total number of gates in city 



Number of check-valves in city 



Number of blow-offs in city January 1, 1922 
Numiber added during the year 
Numfber discontinued .... 

Total number of blow-offs . 



Number of waterposts in city January 1, 1922 
Number removed during the year . 

Total number of waterposts . 



Number of drinking fountains in city . 



Number of car-sprinkler connections in city 



1,900 



16 

11 

46 

6 



4 
5 
1 



79 



10 



185 
5 



72 
6 



6» 

1,969 

8- 



190' 

66 

8 

17 



Water Services. 

Number of services in city January 1, 1922 
(approximately) ..... 

Number laid during the year .... 221 
Number permanently discontinued ... 8 

Net increase in services ..... 

Total numlber of water services in city . 
Amount received for services laid in 1922 . 
Number feet service pipe in city January 1, 

1922 (city and private) approximately . 
Number feet laid during the year . . . 7,708 
Number feet discontinued .... 348 

Increase in feet of service pipe 

Total feet service pipe (city and private) 

(approximately) 

Total service mileage (approximately) . 



13,631 



213 



13,844 

$9,674 58 

470,445. 



7,360 



477,805 
90.5 



Size, Dumber and length of services installed in 1922 : 



164-%"-5868' 
l-2"-27' 



35-%"-1191' 
4-4"-150' 



ll-l"-322' 
3-6"-75' 



3-1% "-75' 



258 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Number of fire services installed during 1922 
(Included in above) 

Location of Fire Services 

Boynton Yard — Consolidated Paper Bag Co. 
Conlon Ct. Ext. — Marden-Wild Corporation 
Fitchburg St. — Sands, Taylor & Wood Co. . 
Grove St. No. 10 — Thos. H. Kingston . 
Kent St., No. 29 — - Camb. Color & Chem'al Co. 
Wash'gton St. — Youlden, Smith & Hopkins . 



No. 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Size 

6" 

4" 
4" 
6" 
4" 
6" 



Water Meters. 

Number of water meters in city, January 1, 1923 
Number installed during the year, new . 

Number reset 

Number added by revision of list 



Number removed on account of permanent or tem- 
porary discontinuance of water and for substitu- 
tion of other meters 

Net increase in number of operating meters 

Total number of meters in service .... 
Number of motor registers (included in above) 
Per cent, of all services metered 



248 
67 
15 

330 



73 



11,190 



257 



11,447 

3 

82.68 



Operating Meters December 31, 1922. 



Size %" 
No. 11,002 



286 



1" 1V 2 " 2" 
9a 18. 24 



Motor and elevator registers 



4" 


6" 


Total 


7 


1 


11,444 
3 



11,447 



Tlie meters installed in 1922 were classed as follows: — 

Applications of property owners 20 

New services 181 

General installation 47 

Reset 67 

Revision of list 15 

Total . 

Meters were removed for the following causes: — 

Vacancies and temporary non-use of water . . 

Services permanently discontinued . 

Replaced by other meters 

Total .......... 73 



330 



44 
12 
17 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



259 



Meters installed yearly on old and new services under the 

State Compulsory Meterage law, which requires complete 

meterage of city by the year 1928: — 

Average installation Meters Set in excess Meters 

required on set on of Total set oil 

old services old services requirements excess new services 

1908 411 755 344 344 147 

1909 ~ 411 637 226 570 201 

1910 411 501 90 660 169 

1911 411 528 117 777 200 

1912 411 423 12 , 789 236 

1913 411 432 21 810 255 

1914 411 422 11 821 231 

1915 411 439 28 849 217 

1916 411 434 23 872 203 

1917 411 163 248t 624 154 

1918 411 82 329f 295 39 

1919 411 166 245f 50 23 

1920 411 115 296t 246t 45 

1921 411 663 6 6 60 

1922 411 67 344t 338t 181 

f Deficiency. 



The following table shows the 
tion of Soinerville by years and the 
consumption : — 

Number 

Popu- of 

Year lation Services 

1897 .....' 58,000 9,601 

1898 59,000 9,806 

1899 61,000 10,052 

1900 62,000 10,291 

1901 64,000 10,520 

1902 66,000 10,710 

1903 68,000 10,854 

1904 69,000 11,059 

1905 70,000 11,279 

1906 71,000 11,489 

1907 72,000 11,662 

1908 74,000 11,817 

1909 76,000 12,018 

1910 78,000 12,149 

1911 79,000 12,357 

1912 80,000 12,596 

1913 82,000 12,827 

1914 85,000 13,034 

1915 87,000 13,233 

1916 90,000 13,420 

1917 91,000 13,509 

1918 91,000 13,514 

1919 92,000 13,544 

1920 93,033 13,554 

1921 95,000 13,631 

1922 96,000 13,844 

t 



progress of meter install a 
results therefrom in water 



Number 

of 
Meters 



143 

226 

202 

224 

269 

647 

1,272 

2,092 

2,829 

3,455 

4,333 

5,155 

5,817 

6,533 

7,171 

7,856 

8,499 

9,155 

9,763 

10,028 

10,116 

10,322 

10,472 

11,190 

11,447 



Per Capita 

Con- 

Per Cent sump- 

Metered tion 

(Est.) 88 

88 



5 
25 



1 

2 

2 

2 

2.5 

6 
11.5 
18.5 
24.5 
29.5 
36.5 
43 
48 
53 
57 
61 
65 
69 

72.75 
74.23 
74.86 
76.21 
77.26 
82.11 
82.68 



Met. 



88 



89 
89 
89 
90 
89 
84 
80 
74 
79 
72 
73 
67 
69 
73 
80 
69 
77 
73 
76 



260 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Summary of Pipes and Fixtures of the Water System. 
December 31 f 1922. 



Feet of main pipe (approximately) 










549,672 


Feet of service pipe (approximately) 










477,805 


Service connections (approximately) 










13,844 


Public fire hydrants 










1,194 


Private fire hydrants 












66 


Gates 












1,969 


Check Valves 












8 


Meters . . 












11,447 


Motor registers 












3 


Waterposts .... 












66 


Car-sprinkler connections 












17 


Blow-offs . 




.. 








190 


Drinking fountains and troughs 












8 



WATER ASSESSMENTS AND CONSUMPTION. 

The annual assessments paid by this city as its propor- 
tionate part of the cost and operation of the Metropolitan 
water works are given below : — 

Sinking Maturing 

Year Fund . Maintenance Interest Bonds Total 

1898 No division made $14,250 19 

1899 " " " 20,975 58 

1900 " " " 28,689 24 

1901 $12,491 73 $12,033 79 $32,291 24 56,816 76 

1902...... 19,014 85 12,955 64 30,427 40 62,397 89 

1903 15,748 56 12,763 10 48,776 77 77,288 43 

1904 16,404 42 15,393 87 54,938 64 86,736 93 

1905 21,358 11 13,666 71 55,535 91 90,560 73 

1906 22,345 50 17,412 51 57,402 07 97,160 08 

1907 25,365 30 18,880 01 62,089 30 106,334 61 

1908 24,865 73 15,221 12 68,604 23 108,691 08 

1909 24,812 23 21,220 56 66,540 41 112,573 20 

1910 25,018 52 18,212 28 66,825 45 110,056 25 

1911 25,424 55 19,573 82 69,849 26 $246 66 115,094 29 

1912 24,469 82 16,111 70 68,205 16 445 46 109,232 14 

1913 24,930 94 20,691 19 70,206 83 491 92 116,320 88 

1914 14,190 98 22,488 71 73,138 81 180 63 109,999 13 

1915 14,164 65 21,376 07 74,111 12 1,129 50 110,781 34 

1916 13,249 71 21,643 98 74,058 98 1,515 62 110,468 29 

1917 13,364 71 28,110 19 75,117 17 1,833 60 118,425 67 

1918 14,193 89 29,185 04 79,975 44 2,004 18 125,358 55 

1919 13,765 81 33,723 64 78,335 58 2,257 87 128,082 90 

1920 12,559 45 37,814 68 74,903 80 2,227 81 127,505 74 

1921 11,956 69 43,942 28 75,848 98 2,241 89 133,989 84 

1922 11,119 49 37,015 40 77,490 17 2,582 78 128,207 84 



$2,405,997 58 



There has been credited to the city by the commonwealth 
as its proportion of the amounts received from entrance fees, 
water supplied outside the district, and water furnished to 
water companies the sum of $9,056.10. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



261 



The daily consumption of water in Somerville, as recorded 
by the Venturi meters, operated by the Metropolitan water- 
works, is shown below by months for the year 1922 : — 



Gallons Gallons 
Month per day per capita 

January 7,523,000 78 

February 7,113,300 74 

March 7,095,600 74 

April 6,894,000 71 

May 7,320,500 76 

June 7,626,200 79 



Gallons Gallons 

Month per day per capita 

July 7,567,200 78: 

August 7,229,000 74 

September .. 6,896,700 71 

October 7,527,300 77 

November .. 7,579,400 78 

December .. 7,877,300 81 



The consumption for the year was : — 

Low-service system 2,u90,461,000 gallons 

High-service system 594,938,000 gallons 

Total consumption , 2,685,399,000 gallons 

Average daily consumption 7,357,300 gallons 

Average daily consumption, per capita, for Som- 
erville 76 gallons 

Average daily consumption, per capita, for Met- 
ropolitan district 94 gallons 

The following table shows the daily per capita consump- 
tion of water in the cities and towns in the Metropolitan Water 
District for the year 1922, as registered by the Metropolitan 
meters : 



City or Town 

Arlington 

Belmont , 


Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec 1 

55 53 51 50 60 58 55 56 54 55 50 51 

50 51 53 54 60 59 58 58 62 60 57 57 
. 121 117 108 107 103 109 107 109 108 110 107 113 

82 80 74 70 77 78 78 77 73 75 72 75 
92 89 85 81 85 87 87 84 85 87 85 90 
65 66 71 76 69 71 64 66 70 65 54 53 

51 50 48 48 51 53 53 55 56 55 53 56 

50 51 49 48 52 55 47 54 52 53 53 53 
61 59 61 61 64 66 66 65 61 63 60 58 
42 43 42 43 48 47 42 43 46 50 49 45 
78 97 70 74 117 197 204 216 175 93 62 57 
85 83 87 86 88 90 85 85 86 79 79 75 
72 67 63 63 71 72 80 81 74 69 61 66 
.78 74 74 71 76 79 -78 74 71 77 78 81 
64 64 59 57 65 68 66 66 66 64 64 76 
59 59 62 60 72 92 100 107 88 69 59 56 
78 74 69 64 69 77 78 75 75 75 77 71 

51 50 50 50 54 58 65 67 57 51 49 49 
101 98 92 91 90 95 93 95 93 94 92 96 


rear 
54 
57 


Chelsea 


110 

76 


Everett 


86 


Maiden 


66 
53 


Medford 


51 




63 


Milton 


45 


Nahant 


120 


Quincy 


84 


Revere , 


70 


Somerville 
Stoneham 
Swampscott .. 
Watertown .... 

Met. Dist 


76 
65 
74 
73 
54 
94 



262 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



"The district, in order of per capita consumption, beginning 
with the lowest, stands as follows for the year 1922 : 



City of Town 
Milton 
Medford 
Maiden 
Arlington 
Winthrop 
Belmont 

Stoneham 

Lexington 

Revere 

Watertown 

Swampscott 

Chelsea . 

Somerville 

Quincy 

Boston 
Nahant 
Total District 

Construction — Maintenance — Operation. 

The construction work of the department is divided 
roughly into three classes, viz : installation of (1 ) water mains ; 
(2) water services ; (3) meters. 

In the first two classes there has been a notable increase 
of activity during the ' year, while but comparatively few 
meters have been installed. 

Details of construction work are given in the tables 
printed in this report ; suffice it to say here that more feet of 
street mains to supply new buildings have been laid and more 
services have been installed during this year than in any other 
since 1914. 

The following table is of interest as it gives the 



Gallons 




Per. 


A 




Cent. 
Services 


Total Per 


Capita 


Per Day per Day 


Metered 


436,000 


45. 


100 


2,193,400 


51 


100 


2,698,000 


53 


97 


1,059,600 


54 


100 


902,400 


54 


99 


673,200 


57 


100 


1,167,800 


62 


99 


523,200 


65 


98 


440,000 


66 


99 


2,202,200 


70 


82 


1,621,800 


73 


100 


629,800 


74 


100 


3,416,500 


76 


99 


7,357,300 


76 


82 


4,253,700 


84 


91 


3,648,900 


86 


75 


85,871,000 


110 


65 


172,300 


120 


76 


119,267,100 


94 


77 



Class of Premises Covered by Service Installation. 

Automobile Sales Building . 1 

Bakery 1 

Chemical laboratory ......... 1 

Dwelling houses . 173 

Factories 3 

Factories; fire pipes 3 

Garages; private 8 

Garages; public 1 

Garage; fire pipe 1 

Gasoline filling stations 6 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



263 



Lumber yard 
Lunch cart 
Milk station 
Office . 
Paint shop 
Stable 
Stores 

Storage warehouse 
•Storage warehouse; fire pipes 
Tenements and stores; block . 



Total service installations 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
12 
2 
2 
1 



221 



Maintenance and upkeep may also be divided into several 
classes, viz: (1) general operation; (2) street mains and at- 
tachments (hydrants, valves etc.); (3) services and fittings; 
(4) meters and boxes; (5) tools and equipment; (6) trans- 
portation. 

The principal job on maintenance of street mains was 
the completion of replacing the old 6" pipe in Linwood street 
in anticipation of the street paving. 

The hydrant and valve system has been as well looked 
after as labor and transportation conditions would permit; it 
is hoped soon to be able to institute a systematic method of 
inspection. 

The increasing use of motor trucks is causing a notice- 
able addition to our work in the upkeep of the fire hydrant 
system, as many hydrants are broken by the operation of these 
vehicles in our streets. In most cases the department is able 
to obtain a settlement for the amount of the damages. 

Other hydrants are put out of order by contractors and 
other inexperienced men using them without authority. 

Our fire service system, covering about 1,200 hydrants, 
has been installed at large expense for protective purposes 
only and should not be used except by firemen in the discharge 
of their duties or by authorized waterworks employees. Our 
city ordinances prescribe penalties for unlawful use of fire 
hydrants and it may be necessary to bring offenders before 
the Courts for punishment. Some contractors argue that 
because the city gives them water without charge in doing 
work for the city that they are entitled to get it by operating 
the fire hydrants. In every such contract made by the city it 
should be clearly stated, so that there can be no misunder- 
standing, that the fire hydrants must not be opened by con- 
tractors. 

The service branch of our department work, with its 
nearly 14,000 pipes, demands a large share of our labor and 



264t ANNUAL REPORTS. 

equipment and we have found it very difficult to keep up with 
the calls for improved water supply. 

As each succeeding year adds to the amount of corrosion 
and filling up of the older pipes and fittings the problem of 
keeping them clear and satisfying the legitimate requirements 
of our water-takers becomes more and more difficult. 

It is certain that more men and equipment will have to be 
provided for this work. 

In anticipation of the permanent paving of a portion of 
Beacon street all the service pipes appearing to need re- 
newal between Buckingham and Park streets were replaced 
with new lead pipes. 

With nearly 12,000 water meters in operation the main- 
tenance of this branch of our work keeps several men with 
equipment busily employed- 

Our meter system sprang into intensive existence twenty 
years ago and has steadily increased in volume and impor- 
tance. Besides the periodical reading of the meters and the 
accounting necessary for billing and collecting the rates, 
which are handled in the general office, there is a large and 
-constantly expanding shop expenditure for the upkeep of the 
meters installed and this will grow with increased installation 
and advancing age of the meters in service. Ample provision 
must therefore be made for carrying on this permanent branch 
of the department work. 

It is the custom of the department to own the meters and 
to furnish them without charge to the property owners, but to 
require payment from them of the cost of installation of the 
meters. 

In most cases the rate-payers find their payments for the 
period of a year on metered consumption considerably less 
than on the old "annual" rate basis, although to secure this 
benefit proper attention must be given to leakages and other 
waste of water. 

Under the law requiring all new houses to be metered 
181 meters were installed. The general installation, however, 
eased up on account of the unusual activities in other direc- 
tions, and there were but 67 of this class installed, making 
the city at the close of the year 82.08% metered. 

Repairs must soon be made to some of our machine-shop 
tools and additional equipment must be provided for carry- 
ing on our service cleaning work. 

Additional transportation in the form of at least two 
new trucks most be provided very soon to take the place of 
old and worn-out motor vehicles. Certain of our transporta- 
tion equipment is of ancient date and, costing the city but 
little in the first place, can well afford to be laid aside now 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 265 

in favor of heavier trucks, better fitted for our requirements. 

The genera] operation of the department is under the 
direction and control of the water commissioner. This in- 
cludes the supervision of all branches of the work, extensions 
of the distribution system, purchase of supplies, employment 
of labor and settlement of the many problems arising in a 
water system supplying a population of nearly 100,000 people. 



Pitometer Survey. 

During the year a survey has been made by the Pitometer 
Company of New York of the entire high-service district of 
the city and of one section of the low-service district includ- 
ing the packing houses and railroad yards. The results were 
very satisfying as showing the generally tight condition of 
the water mains and services in the two portions of the city 
surveyed- 

The general scope of the survey covered the following 
points: (a) A subdivision of the section to be surveyed into 
districts and measurements of the consumption throughout 
the twenty-four hours; (b) Subdivision of the districts where 
excessive waste was indicated, and investigations of all blocks 
on which high rates of flow were indicated to determine the 
cause; (c) A test of the Metropolitan Venturi meters for ac- 
curacy; (d) A check on large consumers for a period of 
twenty-four hours; (e) A test of all meters 4" and over for 
accuracy; (f) A report of the work done and results accom- 
plished. 

Methods of the survey ; The entire high-service system was 
divided into four districts, containing about 30!/2 miles of 
street mains and a population estimated at 30,000. 

District 1 of the low-service system, embracing in a broad 
expression that part of the city lying south of Somerville 
avenue and Washington street, was also divided into four 
districts covering about 18 miles of water mains and an 
estimated population of 17,000. 

Each district was formed by closing a line of boundary 
gates around the area to be tested, supplying that area through 
but one pipe. A pitometer was then inserted into this supply 
main through a 1" corporation cock and a continuous meas- 
urement of the flow through it was made for a period of 
twenty-four hours. 

As a general rule in districts where the minimum night 
rate is less than 50% of the average daily consumption the 
condition is considered satisfactory. However, in this survey 
all residential districts were investigated by sub-division at 



266 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

night, by supplying the district through the same or a smaller 
feed and by closing interior- and opening exterior valves; then, 
by noting the corresponding drops in the consumption indi- 
cated by the pitometer, the rate of flow for each block was 
determined. 

In high rate blocks where the rate could not be accounted 
for by large consumers, the underground waste or leakage was 
located with various forms of listening devices. 

In the tests of the Venturi meters, a pitometer was set 
up on the main leading from the meters and readings were 
taken from the Venturi charts and compared with the pito- 
meter records for a period of twenty-four hours. 

The large city meters were tested by placing a pitometer 
on the main or service pipe leading into the meter and measur- 
ing the flow for a period of twenty minutes- 

The results of investigations on the total supply showed 
that during the period of the test the total consumption of 
the high-service system was 1,587,000 gallons a day and the 
minimum night rate was 1,047,000 a day. On a basis of the 
estimated population the per-capita consumption was approxi- 
mately 53 gallons a day. 

The total amount of leakage disclosed in the survey of 
the high-service was 228,000 gallons a day. Of this amount 
leaks of 106,000 gallons a day were discovered and were be- 
ing repaired by the water department. The remaining 182,000 
gallons a day represents the real saving due to the pitometer 
survey. All of the leaks were on house services and one of 
them was discharging out of holes in the pipe and running 
into a nearby sewer at the rate of 110,000 gallons a day. 
There was nothing on the surface of the ground to indicate 
any leakage but the earth filling around the leaking pipe gave 
every indication that the water had been escaping and running 
into the sewer for some time. 

Respecting the valves in the high-service system the report 
states: "Most of the valves were found to be in very good 
condition. About 70% of the valves were operated. The 
majority of the valve boxes were covered by a tar paving 
making it difficult to locate them. The division gates ami 
check valves were almost 100% tight. The water department 
is to be commended for this excellent condition of the division 
gates, because it is highly important in cities that have both 
high and low-service to keep the two entirely separate." 

Of the hydrants the report reads : "Only a small per- 
centage of the total number were operated during our sur- 
vey: however those we did operate were in first class con- 
dition." 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 267 

Regarding the mains the report says: "The mains were 
found to be very clean and free from loose sediment. Very 
few complaints were recorded during the survey which, in most 
cases, reversed the flow entirely and would have dislodged 
mud and all loose sediment if present." 

The report on the high-service system concludes as fol- 
lows : ' k As a whole the high-service system was found to be in 
very good condition. During our survey we observed that 
leaks large and small were attended to without delay, and 
the desire of the water department seemed to be to keep 
the system in the best condition possible at all times." 

The following recommendation was also made : "In order- 
to have two large mains feeding West Somerville the 12" 
main in Dearborn road and College avenue should be 
extended west along Talbot avenue and connect with the 
present main therein" 

In that section of the low-service system which was in- 
vestigated and which has been previously referred to, the 
average daily consumption was found to be 3,190,000 gallons 
and the minimum night rate was 2,200,000 gallons or 69 % of 
the average daily rate. This is largely an industrial section 
of the city and considerable water is used nights in the several 
packing-house plants and in the extensive yards of the Boston 
& Maine Railroad, the figures showing an industrial and mis- 
cellaneous consumption daily of 1,975,000 gallons. The aver- 
age daily rate of consumption per capita in the residential 
sections of this district is shown to be about 56 gallons. 

The leakages discovered in this district by the pitometer 
survey were scattered and mostly small but amounted in total 
to 108,000 gallons a day, or 6,000 gallons per mile of street 
mains. 

Of the meter tests in Section 1 of the low-service system 
the report of the Pitometer Company reads: "About two- 
thirds of the consumption of Section 1 is taken up by Districts 
No. 3 and Xo. 4 and practically all of it is actually accounted 
for by meter registration. This condition is very commendable 
for the water department. All the tests on the meters were 
made during normal flow. Two of the four-inch meters had 
been recently repaired and overhauled by the water depart- 
ment and were found O. K. The 6" Worthington meter was 
found to be registering exactly. This meter registers the 
greatest flow of any of the large meters. An average daily 
flow through it is 250,000 gallons. It was impossible to test 
the remainder of the large meters at this time due to intricate 
piping adjacent to them." The report also shows a 4" Gem 
meter and a 4" Trident Compound meter to be registering 
accurately on a test covering a period of 16 minutes. 



268 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Concerning the valves the report states : "About 80 % of 
the valves in the section were operated. They were found to 
be in very good condition." Of the mains the report reads : 
"The mains are also in first-class condition- The average pipe 
coefficient obtained from the tests was .82" 

The report on this section of the low-service system con- 
cludes : "As has been stated before, the industrial consumption 
accounts for practically two-thirds of the total consumption 
of Section 1, and the same is mostly metered. 

The water waste in and around these large plants is very 
low and we consider the existing conditions very good. No 
large leaks were discovered in the residential districts ; however 
the average rate per block is higher than it need be and there 
is probably quite a little immetered fixture leakage. A rigid 
inspection of all plumbing in unrnetered buildings would un- 
doubtedly bring results. A thorough investigation was made 
on all blocks having a large rate of flow and in almost every 
case small fixture leaks were discovered. In general the con- 
dition of Section 1 of the low-service is very good and the 
water department is to be commended for the excellent con- 
dition existing in and about the plants of the largest con- 
sumers." 

The Company makes the following recommendations: (1) 
All valves and hydrants should be operated at least once a 
year. (2) Gate boxes should be maintained up to grade so 
that they can be easily located in case of emergency. 

As the city is now about one-half covered by the survey 
of the Pitometer Company I recommend that the remaining 
portion be tested out during the coining year. 

Financial Statistics of Cities. 

From a census report issued by the Department of Com- 
merce as of December 31, 1920, showing the total and per 
capita water revenue receipts from earnings, and the total 
and per capita expenses and outlays, the following figures, in- 
teresting from their very favorable comparison with other 
cities of about the same population, are taken : 

City : Somerville, Mass. 
Rank in population : 78 

Water Kevenue receipts from earnings ; per capita $2.74 
Water Payments for expenses and outlays ; per capita $1.12 

Additional High-Service Supply. 

The Metropolitan District Commission has nearly com- 
pleted the construction of an additional supply main from 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 269 

near the reservoirs at Spot Pond to a point near their present 
Tponnection with our local high-service system in Broadway at 
Cedar street. It is hoped that this will materially strengthen 
the conditions at present existing in our high-service supply. 
I think it would be wise now to extend our own high-service 
main through Cedar street from the water- works yard to«a 
connection with the existing main at Hudson street in order 
to boost the delivery of high pressure water at this central 
point of the city and equalize its distribution throughout that 
district. 

I also recommend the early construction of a 12" water 
main in Talbot avenue, connecting the two existing dead ends 
in order to bring in a larger supply to the West Somerville 
high-service district. 

Our low-service supply also is in need of building up in 
Joy and Poplar streets and I recommend that the old mains 
in these two streets be replaced with larger pipes during the 
coming season- 



Water Income. 

The water income for the year was the largest ever re- 
ceived, amounting to .^284.126 (>2. Notwithstanding the heavy 
outlays of the department, construction account showing more 
than double that of the previous year, a substantial surplus of 
over |48,000 is recorded on our books. 

As usual, all department bills contracted during the year 
were paid from the amounts appropriated and the year closed 
with no current liabilities and no funded indebtedness. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Frank E. Merrill, 

Water Commissioner. 



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280 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1922. 

In form recommended by the New England Water Works Association. 

SOMERVILLE WATER WORKS 

SOMERVILLE, MIDDLESEX COUNTY, MASS. 

General Statistics. 

Population, census 1920, 93,033; present, estimated 96,000. 
Date of construction: Commenced in 1868. 
By whom owned: City of Somerville. 
Source of supply: Metropolitan water system. 

Mode of supply: Water is delivered into the city's mains, under 
both high and low pressure, by the Metropolitan Water Works. 

Statistics of Consumption of Water. 

Census population, 1920, 93,033. 

Population on lines of pipe, Dec. 31, 1922, 96,000. 

Population supplied, Dec. 31, 1922, 96,000. 

Total consumption for the year, 2,685,399,000 gallons. 

Average daily consumption, 7, 357,300 gallons. 

Gallons per day to each inhabitant, 76. 

Statistics Relating to Distribution System, 1922. 

MAINS 
Kind of pipe, cast iron. 

Sizes, from 4-inch and under to 20-inch. 

Laid 7.566 feet; discontinued 674 feet; net extension, 6892 feet. 

Total now in use, 104.1 miles. 

Number of hydrants added during year (public, 12; private, 2), 14. 

Number of hydrants (public and private) now in use, 1,260. 

Number of stop gates added during year, 69. 

Number of stop gates now in use, 1,969. 

Number of blow-offs, 190. 

Range of pressure on mains, 35 pounds to 100 pounds. 

SERVICES 

Kind of pipe : Lead ; lead-lined wrought iron ; cement-lined wrought 
iron; cast iron. 

Sizes, one-half to eight inches. 

Extended 7,708 feet; discontinued 348 feet. 

Total now in use 90.5 miles. 

Number of service taps added, 221; discontinued, 8; increase, 213. 

Number now in use, 13,844. 

Number of meters added, 330; meters and motor registers discon- 
tinued, 73; net increase, 257. 

Number now in use, 11,447. 

Percentage of services metered, 82.68. 

Percentage of water receipts from metered servics, 89.4. 

Number of motors and elevator registers added, 0; removed, 0. 

Number now in use, 3 (included in number of meters). 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



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282 ANNUAL RErORTS. 



REPORT OF PUBLIC WELFARE AND RECREATION 

COMMISSION. 



To the Public Welfare and Recreation Commission : 

In pursuance with annual custom I am submitting to 
your Commission the report of the summer playgrounds for 
the season of 1922. In this report I shall endeavor to recount 
the accomplishments of the past season and to mention the 
things which in my opinion are essential to future success 
of the playground work. 



Features. 

In the opinion of the Director there were some few out- 
standing features of the season of 1922. I shall but name 
them under this caption and refer more fully to them under 
more appropriate headings. 

A considerable gain was made in the amount of per- 
manent equipment secured for the playgrounds. 

Central Hill Park proved itself to be an attractive place 
for playground purposes. 

Much more satisfactory use was made of the wading facil- 
ities at the Richard Trum playground and the tennis courts 
on the public areas, due, in part, to the repairs and addition- 
al care taken of the same. 



Grounds. 

Playgrounds were conducted on eight areas during the 
past summer. These areas were the same as those used the 
previous year, and with the possible exception of the Hodg- 
kins School yard in ward seven, all of the grounds justified 
their being used for the purpose. The one exception named 
has been of late years rather poorly attended by the children 
of the neighborhood, and despite efforts to improve the at- 
tendance, rarely attracts more than an average of thirty 
children at one time. While, of course, even this small num- 
ber might justify its continuance, my observation leads me 
to believe that the early completion of the ground in the 
rear of the Western Junior High School is most desirable. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 283 

This latter area will afford more ample space for the play- 
ing of active games and in addition, has the added asset of 
being more suitably located for the persons of that section 
of the city. Informal plans have also been stated relative to 
improving the rear end of the Saxton C. Foss Park in the 
near future. Such changes as have been contemplated are 
in my opinion most desirable and will do much toward get- 
ting the maximum use out of this area for recreation pur- 
poses. 

I again call to your attention the necessity for more 
space for playing in the districts served by the Kent Street 
and Bennett School playgrounds. Each of these grounds 
caters to a very populous section of our city and both are at 
present inadequate for the playing of active games. 

The playground on Central Hill which was opened for 
the first time during the summer of 1921, was during the 
past summer, one of the best attended grounds in the city, 
despite the fact that it is void of any permanent equipment. 
I strongly urge that before the coming summer, provision be 
made for some permanent apparatus on Central Hill Park. 
I believe that such equipment can be located on the rear part 
of the hill without injuring in any way the sightliness of 
the location. 



Finances. 

There was expended during the summer of 1922 from the 
city treasury for playground purposes the sum of $2225.29. 
Of this amount the expense for supervision was $1763.00, 
for supplies and maintenance $124.89, and for labor $37.50. 
In addition approximately $400.00 was spent from the treas- 
ury of the Somerville Playgrounds Association. This last 
amount was devoted almost entirely to the furnishing of per- 
manent equipment. A new swing frame for the use of the 
smaller children was erected on the Bennett School ground, 
and a similar one was placed on the Kent Street ground. By 
utilizing the pipe obtained from a portion of the old gymnasi- 
um structure on Lincoln Park, the swing apparatus of the 
Kichard Trum playground was augmented by a new section 
capable of holding eight additional swings, and at the Saxton 
C. Foss Park eleven new swings were hung in place of the 
six which had heretofore been in use. Besides the above 
named improvements, the funds of the Somerville Playgrounds 
Association supplied twenty additional tilts for use through- 



284 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

out the city, and a large quantity of swing chains, seats, and 
fittings. 

Due to this financial assistance received from this Asso- 
ciation, more new apparatus and equipment was provided dur- 
ing the summer of 1922 than during any previous year since 
the original construction work was done at the outset of the 
playground movement in Somerville. In this connection it 
may be appropriate to state that practically all of the per- 
manent equipment now in use, of the playground system, par- 
ticularly on those areas not under the control of the City 
Engineer's Department, has been obtained from the funds 
supplied by this civic organization. 

Supervision. 

For the first time in the history of playgrounds in this 
city the supervisors were put on a Civil Service basis, due 
to the requirements of the state authorities. Besides the 
Directors, sixteen persons were employed to supervise the play 
activities. Of this number, fourteen were assigned to local 
playgrounds and two acted as special supervisors of hand- 
work and dancing. All but two of the supervisors were resi- 
dents of Somerville. This statement is made to show that 
despite the Civil Service restrictions as to qualifications, it 
was possible to secure from among our own residents efficient 
supervision. From acquaintance with the conditions in other 
municipalities like ours, it can be stated that such was not 
the case in those places. The Director feels that this policy 
should be continued in Somerville, unless its continuance 
should in any way handicap the efficiency of the playground 
organization. 

From the results obtained in the two seasons in which 
special attention has been given to handwork and dancing 
activities, it is recommended that these two phases of the 
playground program should be supervised by an individual 
selected for that purpose. 

Attendance. 

During the season just closed the total attendance ap- 
proximated that of the previous year. The most noticeable 
increase in attendance was at the ground on Central Hill. 

A noteworthy fact about the attendance throughout the 
city was that the larger children were very few in number. 
This situation necessitates some alteration in the conduct of 
the grounds, because the program of activities must be varied 
for children of different ages. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 



285 



The figures for the attendance on the several grounds 
are as follows: 



Bennett School 
•Central Hill Park 
Saxton C. Foss Park 
Hodgkins School 
Kent iStreet . 
/Lincoln Park 
Richard Trum Playground 
Perry iSchool 



General Total for the Season 
Average Weekly Attendance 
Average Daily Attendance 



7,753 

5,435 

9,976 

2,263 

10,430 

18,392 

17,703 

6,154 

78,096 

11,156 

2,231 



Games. 

The principal portion of a playground program is de- 
voted to active games. Baseball, of course, occupies the lead- 
ing position among boys during the summer months, and the 
leagues which were established for both the smaller and 
larger boys of the city again proved most attractive. The 
boys from the Kent Street playground succeeded in winning 
the larger number of games in the junior league and the 
boys from Lincoln Park were victorious for the senior cham- 
pionship. 

There are two outstanding facts in connection with the 
conduct of baseball on the summer playgrounds which, I 
think, deserve special mention. The first is that it has been 
possible during the past summer to organize boys 7 teams on 
two of the so-called girls' playgrounds; that is, in spite of 
the fact that there were no male instructors on Central Hill 
Park and the Hodgkins School ground, the boys of those 
playgrounds exhibited sufficient spirit to organize their own 
teams, enter into the league competition, and fulfill their 
games on the schedule. The other outstanding feature is 
that of the ninety games scheduled, all but four were played. 
When one considers the number of attractions which occur 
in a boy's life during the summer months, and when there 
is also taken into consideration the fact that none of the 
teams which journey from one ground in the city to another 
is accompanied by supervisors, this situation appears quite 
remarkable. 

In addition, the boys were encouraged to participate in 
numerous other active contests and athletic events, care be- 
ing taken to provide instruction and supervision in games 
suited to the age of the children who were to participate. 

Inter-playground competition has also become quite pre- 



286 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

valent among the girls. Although no schedule was made for 
such, during the past summer several contests in volley ball, 
dodge ball, and bat ball were arranged at the bi-weekly meet- 
ings of supervisors. 

During the final week of the season two teams from one 
of the playgrounds in the city of Newton visited the Saxton 
C. Foss Park in our city and demonstrated the game of fist 
ball which has become quite popular in Newton. If condi- 
tions warrant it, this game will undoubtedly be introduced 
on the Somerville playgrounds in the future. 

Handwork. 

It can be stated without hesitation that the handwork 
produced by the children of the Somerville playgrounds dur- 
ing the summer of 1922 far excelled that made during any 
previous season. Both in the number of articles made and 
in the quality of the work done, this feature of our under- 
taking was the recipient of much favorable comment. 

During the final week of the playground season a dis- 
play of the handwork was placed in conspicuous places for 
the inspection of the residents of the community. This exhi- 
bition was located for a period of three days each in the show 
windows of Jackson Caldwell & Co., in Union Square, Parke 
Snow, Inc., in Davis Square, and J. E. Lydstone at the corner 
of Broadway and Walnut Street. Many hundreds of people 
inspected these exhibitions and expressed considerable praise 
at the character and finish of the articles made. Included 
among the finished products were : serving trays, baskets, sew- 
ing boxes, desk sets, vases, hammocks, sweaters, dresses, em- 
broidery work and other useful and ornamental articles. 

The initial expenditure for the handwork was made from 
the funds of the Somerville Playgrounds Association and 
the money obtained from the sale of the materials to the chil- 
dren was in turn used for the purchase of additional supplies. 
This method of conducting this portion of the playground 
work seems most desirable because it eliminates the undesir- 
able feature of free distribution to the children at public ex- 
pense. 

Dancing. 

As in the case of the handwork the dancing was super- 
vised during the past summer by a young lady employed for 
that purpose. Experience has shown that this method secures 
best results, for under the former policy it was impossible 
to secure uniformity throughout the city. This uniform in- 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 287 

struction in an activity which occupies so important a place 
in playground work, shows its results on such occasions as 
the annual play demontration at the close of the season. 

Notwithstanding the fact that the dancing is greatly 
handicapped by lack of musical accompaniment on many of 
the grounds, the results have been most commendable and 
have been the subject of much comment from the public at 
large. 

Closing Demonstration. 

On Tuesday, August 22, a closing demonstration of play- 
ground activities was presented on Saxton C. Foss Park. All 
the playgrounds of the city participated, the number of play- 
ground children present being estimated at 1,500. 

The exhibition was given at the twlilight period in or- 
der that a large number of adults might be able to witness 
the program. The exercises preceded the regularly scheduled 
band concert which was given at the same place under the 
auspices of the Metropolitan District Commission. 

The program of eighteen events included competitive 
games for boys and girls, relay races, dances, marches and 
drills. A large number of citizens witnessed the exhibition 
and also viewed the handwork display which was placed in 
a show window near the scene of the demonstration. Among 
the group of spectators were many of the city officials and 
playground officials from other communities. 

The demonstration each year serves as a fitting closing 
to the playground season, furnishes a means of exhibiting 
the results of supervised play to the members of the com- 
munity, and best of all, provides the opportunity of encour- 
aging the children in their play activities. 

Cooperation. 

As the Director has remarked previously, one of the most 
encouraging features of the playground undertaking is the 
assistance from agencies other than the department in direct 
charge of supervised recreation. This cooperation manifests 
itself in various ways. A few instances will be mentioned: 

The Somerville Public Library again placed at the dis- 
position of the summer playgrounds a large deposit of books 
suitable for the children. This furnished the playgrounds 
with another source of recreation, and at the same time 
served as a medium of promoting the interest of the children 
in a very profitable diversion — the reading of good books. 

The Fire Department officials were ready and accommo- 



288 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

dating to send the hose wagons to the playgrounds on ex- 
tremely warm days to provide shower baths for the children. 

The departments conducted by the City Engineer and the 
Building Commissioner, and others which are closely con- 
nected with the playground • management rendered courteous 
and valuable assistance whenever called upon. 

The merchants in the several sections of the city cheer- 
fully donated prizes for the picnic contests whenever the in- 
dividual playgrounds conducted outings during the season. 
Several of the business men of the city furnished trucks for 
transportation of the children to and from their picnic 
grounds. 

More than ever before, there was noticed this summer 
a sort of participation in the play activities by the adult mem- 
bers of the community. As a vivid illustration of this state- 
ment I cite many mothers who came for long periods during 
the afternoon to the Hodgkins, Central Hill, Saxton C. Foss 
and other grounds to mingle with the children and act almost 
as if they had been officially assigned as assistants to the 
supervisor of the ground. 

This last and the above instances of cooperation furnish 
an optimistic outlook for the future. When the playground 
movement or any other municipal activity succeeds in secur- 
ing the voluntary interest of the citizens it is sufficiently 
rooted to insure its growth. 

Recommendations. 

As a result of close study, and from the experience of 
dealing with the summer playground situation in Sonierville 
for a number of years, I make the following definite recom- 
mendations for the future: 

1. The early completion of the playground in the rear 
of the Western Junior High School. 

2. Hastening the erection of a field building on the 
Richard Trnm Playground. 

3. The placing of some permanent equipment on the 
Medford Street side of Central Hill Park. 

. 4. Securing more adequate play space in the districts 
served by Kent Street and Bennett Playgrounds. 

5. Early attention to improving Saxton C. Foss Park 
with a view to utilizing the lower end of same for athletic 
purposes. 

6. The filling in of the unused sand pit on the Perry 
School Playground in order to increase the play area of that 
ground and so make use of the shade trees now fenced off 
from the rest of the playground. 



WELFARE ANI» RECREATION COMMISSION. 289 

7. Additional swings on Lincoln Park Playground. 

8. The planting of shade trees on some of the play- 
grounds to provide a natural shelter for the future. 

9. The possible widening of the scope of the summer 
playground undertaking to include such fields as supervised 
play after school hours, and a closer relationship between 
school recreation activities and the field now covered by the 
Public Welfare and Recreation Commission. 



Conclusion. 

In concluding the report for the season of 1922, I desire 
to digress somewhat from the field of summer playgrounds 
and to add a brief comment on the general subject of recrea- 
tion in Somerville. 

From continuous experience in this type of work it is 
my opinion that in a city as populous as Somerville whose 
future growth is destined to be confined, the problem of recrea- 
tion as a municipal activity must soon rise from its present 
somewhat undefined level to a more definite and comprehen- 
sive plane. This statement is made, not in any sense of dic- 
tation to your Commission but rather with the feeling that 
your Commission would expect from its Playground Director 
a statement of his attitude and his opinions in the field in 
which he is employed. 

I desire to express appreciation to the Chairman and 
members of your body for the assistance rendered during the 
season. I feel that thanks is due especially to the Somerville 
Playgrounds Association for the cooperation and assistance 
it has rendered, as also to the other municipal departments 
mentioned elsewhere in this report. 

The cooperative and friendly attitude of the playground 
supervisors is deserving of especial mention, because without 
such assistance the Director would be handicapped. 

While it is somewhat out of the ordinary to make such 
a statement, the Director would be remiss if at this juncture 
he failed to add a comment on the attitude of the children of 
Somerville toward the playgrounds. Appreciating as much 
as anybody the shortcomings and faults of children in the 
matter of respect for city property and undertakings, I never- 
theless am more confident that Somerville experiences what 
might be called a mimimum of trouble in this regard. From 
comparison with other communities, from personal observa- 
tion, and from authoritative reports, I feel that we experience 
less difficulty in the conduct of the children during the sum- 
mer months than many other communities of our size. Such; 



290 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

misdemeanors and breaches of conduct as do occur are con- 
fined to a very small minority and there have been few dem- 
onstrations of the so-called "gang spirit." 

There is encouragement in the knowledge that the re- 
turns from supervised recreation in our city are being made 
in the manifestations of orderliness and appreciation given 
by those upon whom our efforts are expended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Stephen H. Mahoney, 

Director of Playgrounds. 



To the Honorable, the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

Herewith is submitted a report of the work of the Pub- 
lic Welfare and Recreation Commission for the year 1922. 
Inasmuch as most of the money under the control of the Com- 
mission was expended in two or three general undertakings, 
it seems advisable to devote most of this report to an account 
of what was done in these directions. Therefore, the Commis- 
sion submits detailed reports of these enterprises which have 
been prepared by the persons having them in charge. These 
reports give in detail the things which have been done in each 
of these lines of effort. The Commission believes that all of 
this work has been well done and that it has served the pub- 
lic interest to a very considerable extent. 

Of these three undertakings, the oldest is that of super- 
vised summer playgrounds. For a number of years, the city 
has appropriated money to pay for the expenses of super- 
vised summer playground work to be conducted during the 
months of July and August. The benefits of this work are 
so clearly manifest that the Commission has had no doubt 
at all about the continuance of this activity. It is convinced 
that this work should be carried on as a part of permanent 
public policy and that it affords a nucleus to which should 
be added expansions of a corresponding nature for the bene- 
fit of individuals and for the benefit of adults. 

A second line of work which the Commission has carried 
on has been the garden work for school children. This work 
was begun during the war and has been conducted with great 
success during the succeeding years. Although originally a 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 291 

war measure there has been much in the character of this 
work to justify it as a policy for the general good of certain 
children of our city. The lack of areas particularly adaf>ted 
to this purpose and the legitimate claim upon public park 
spaces for recreational purposes are reasons which combine 
to make the conduct of school gardens as a public policy one 
less obviously the duty of this Commission than are some 
other activities within the scope of the Commission's power. 

The resignation in October, 1922, of William B. Moore, 
Supervisor of Gardens, caused a loss to this line of work 
which it would be difficult to over-estimate. Mr. Moore had 
had charge of the garden work since the early days of the 
war and through his original methods, his efficient knowledge 
of garden-making, and his extraordinary facility in dealing 
with children, had brought to this work a degree of success 
wholly out of proportion to the means at his disposal. 

The Commission is glad to pay this tribute to Mr. Moore 
and to express in this public way its sense of the loss which 
must come to the juvenile garden-makers of Somerville 
through his resignation from this position. 

The third line of activity which has been conducted by 
the Commission during the past year is also one which had 
its beginning in previous years. This is the one dealing with 
social and educational opportunities for adults. The main 
feature of this work has been that taken up in the Neighbor- 
hood House on Poplar Street which is described in one of 
the reports submitted herewith. Another line has been that 
of social meetings in the Clark Bennett and Bingham Schools. 

During the year the Commission has cooperated with 
organizations having for their purpose the promotion of civic 
betterment. Among these are the Somerville Playgrounds 
Association and the Ways and Means Committee, represent- 
ing the various women's clubs of the city. The Commission 
wishes to acknowledge the high purpose and the devoted ser- 
vice rendered by both of these organizations. The former, 
in addition to its general activity in aid of the summer play- 
grounds, contributed a lump sum of $475 to be expended by 
the Commission for the purchase of play material, and the 
latter has supported in large part the work of the Neighbor- 
hood House. The Commission has continued to work as a 
clearing house in securing cooperation among the various 
departments of the City Government having recreational or 
welfare interest. It has sought and has secured cooperation 
from all of these in promoting its own activities. In all the 
ways under its control, the Commission has tried to create 
a healthy public interest in recreation and to increase the 



292 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

opportunities therefor. It has been conservative in adopting 
new policies or in making recommendations for the enlarge- 
ment of its present activities. It has deemed it important 
to thoroughly study the situation in Somerville for the pur- 
pose of finding out in what direction improvements should be 
made in public-controlled recreation. The Commission firmly 
believes that public health, safety, and contentment, all re- 
quire the development under public control of a scheme of 
recreation which will be adequate to the needs of the whole 
population. Because it was not ready to choose and start a 
new undertaking in the line of adult recreation, the Commis- 
sion did not use all of its appropriation this year but turned 
over a part of it to be applied to the erection of the Eichard 
Tram Field House. 

During the next year the Commission hopes to formulate 
and announce a definite policy of such a reasonable charac- 
ter as to be adapted to not alone the needs but the financial 
ability of the city. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Charles S. Clark. 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF SCHOOL GARDENS 

Somerville, Mass.. 
December 7th, 1922. 

Members of the Public Welfare and Recreation Commission. 
Somerville. Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

In presenting my annual report of this branch of work 
under your control. I desire to summarize the accomplish- 
ments of the past season, pointing out some of the most prom- 
inent features and making some suggestions for the work in 
the future. 

My work as garden supervisor is divided into four dif- 
ferent lines of work, namely: (1) The teaching of simple 
and practical gardening in the public schools: (2) the abso- 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 293 

lute control and supervision of public and private areas de- 
voted to school gardens; (3) the giving of advice and assist- 
ance to every person desiring it in the conduct of a home, 
vacant lot, or community garden; (4) and the organizing and 
supervising of canning operations. 

1. Your Garden Supervisor has been regularly employed 
during the winter months by the School Department in teach- 
ing classes composed of children who have an opportunity 
to have a garden at home, who express a desire to have a 
school garden, or who have an opportunity to pursue agricul- 
tural activities during the summer season outside of the city. 

This class-room instruction is along simple and practical 
lines of agricultural gardening. By means of this instruc- 
tion the children are better prepared to take up this line of 
work when the time for actual garden activities is at hand 
in the spring. In the school-yards of four schools your Super- 
visor built cold-frames last fall and as soon as weather condi- 
tions permitted started tomato, radish and cabbage to be 
transplanted into the garden areas at the proper time, 
Through this instruction about nine hundred children received 
some permanent benefit. 

2. The same general plan used the past four years in 
the conduct of school gardens was continued during the sea- 
son of 1922. Each child cultivated a plot, the area of which 
was 300 sq. ft. The child paid for the seeds and plants actual- 
ly used in his plot, and what was raised was the property of 
the child and could be taken home or disposed of as he saw 
fit. 

One-half day each week was devoted by your Supervisor 
to each garden area, and the children showed their interest 
and enthusiasm in this work by their prompt and faithful 
attendance during the entire garden season. Two hundred and 
eighty-five children conducted school gardens the past sea- 
son, the public areas totalling about seven acres. Each child 
planted twelve different kinds of vegetables in his garden, 
besides doing his part in the cultivation and care of a piece 
of land devoted to the raising of sweet corn and winter squash. 
These two crops were harvested by your Supervisor and dis- 
tributed equally among the children having school gardens. 

Weather conditions the first part of the season of 1922 
were not ideal for the carrying on of garden work. Because 
of excessive rains, it was necessary to replant several of the 
school garden areas. This involved a large amount of extra 
work for the boys and girls as well as for the Supervisor, 
but in spite of adverse conditions the school gardens in the 
City of Somerville this year were most successful both from 



294 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

the standpoint of general appearance and the value in dollars 
and cents of the crops raised and harvested. 

The keeping of a garden record book by every school 
gardener was a part of his regular garden work. In keeping 
this book, the children are not only taught practical arithme- 
tic and spelling but get some idea of the value of the things 
they raise and the manner in which they are sold or marketed. 
The books are all turned in to the Supervisor at the end of 
the garden season, and from a careful analysis of these books 
some very interesting facts and figures are obtainable. The 

total value of the corn and squash alone more than offset 
the entire expense of this commission for carrying on the 
garden work for the season of 1922. The value of the vege- 
tables raised in the individual plots was approximately 
$7500.00. One-third of that amount represents the value of the 
vegetables sold by the children, while the other two-thirds were 
used in the home as fresh vegetables or were canned for use 
during the winter. 

Your Supervisor endeavored this year to devote more 
time and space on the school garden areas to the cultivation 
of flowers, and on the different areas this undertaking was 
highly successful. The flowers grown at Broadway Park at- 
tracted a great deal of attention from passersby and brought 
forth many favorable comments from the general public. It 
also was an object lesson to the children, and in the cultiva- 
tion and care of these areas devoted to flowers, I believe, 
lessons were taught to the children that will be productive 
of results around their homes in the years to come. 

At the end of the garden season, exhibits were made in 
two different places, first at Boston at the Massachusetts Hor- 
ticultural Society building where we exhibited products from 
the school gardens and the canning clubs and received many 
cash prizes. These prizes were won in competition with many 
other cities in this part of the State and show the kind of 
work done and that the results obtained by the children in 
the City of Somerville compared most favorably with the 
work in other localities. At the New England fair held at 
Worcester, your Supervisor made both canning and garden 
exhibits, and we were awarded prizes totaling $46.00 in money 
at this fair which draws entrants from cities and towns from 
all over New England. One exhibit made up of twenty-four 
jars of fruit canned by one of our canning clubs not only 
won first prize of $10.00 but was awarded a special prize of 
$5.00 more because it had the highest score of any collection 
ever entered for competition in this class at the New Eng- 
land fair. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 295 

All of the areas of land devoted to school gardens were 
this year cleaned up by the children and the refuse carted 
away. Most of these areas have been fertilized, plowed, and 
seeded to winter rye with the idea of turning this green crop 
under in the spring and putting back humus in the ground 
for use another year. 

3. Giving of advice and assistance in the conduct of 
home gardens and community gardens is a line of work that 
has greatly increased during the last two or three years. 
While it may be true that less area is devoted to garden work 
since the close of the war than during the war, those conduct- 
ing gardens seem to have met with more serious difficulties 
and have called upon your Supervisor for more assistance 
than they did during the war and when garden activities 
were at their height. Weather conditions^ the control of 
disease, and insects are a constant source of trouble and have 
been the occasion for repeated calls for advice from your 
Supervisor as to the best method of control and procedure. 
Most of the adults conducting gardens in the City of Somer- 
ville have gone through the experimental stage and the re- 
sults obtained are far more satisfactory and more remuner- 
ative than ever before. When one considers the small amount 
of space available for garden work and the poor quality of 
the soil throughout the entire city, the results obtained are a 
revelation to agricultural people. 

4. This year your Supervisor devoted more time and 
energy to the forming and carrying on of canning clubs than 
ever before. One hundred and twenty-six children were en- 
rolled who carried on canning clubs at two centers, one lo- 
cated in the cooking room of the Western Junior High School, 
the other at the Senior High School. Two instructors were 
regularly employed five days a week. The work of these clubs 
was carried on under the direction of the State and County 
agricultural organizations, the requirements of which are 
very strict. 

Some idea of the volume of work done by these clubs 
may be obtained by examining the reports submitted by your 
Supervisor to the State Department of Agriculture. In this 
report, I stated that each of the one hundred and twenty- 
six members canned an average of thirty- two jars apiece, or 
a total of four thousand and thirty-two jars; the average 
value of each is 40c per jar or a total value of $1612.80. 

Some idea of the quality of the work done by these chil- 
dren may be realized when I state that in every exhibition 
of canned products that was made this year we. won a first 
prize in every class. These exhibits were made at Boston and 



296 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Worcester. In the exhibit at Worcester to which I have re- 
ferred before, the prize won there was in competition with 
twenty-six hundred jars of canned products. 

Exhibitions of the products of the canning clubs were 
lield in nine different schools this fall at which a judge pro- 
vided by the State was present and scored five jars exhibited 
by each one of the one hundred and twenty-six club mem- 
bers. Out of a possible hundred per cent, the average score 
of all participants was 93.6, which is a very creditable score 
and one seldom equalled, so I am told by the Department of 
Agriculture. This useful form of summer work has gained 
very rapidly during the past few years. Many other cities 
and towns now carry on canning operations on a larger and 
more comprehensive scale, and I would recommend that more 
equipment and better facilities be provided another year for 
this most useful and productive branch of your work. 

In closing, permit me to express my appreciation to all 
those who have shown an interest and been a help in this 
work. It is through the co-operation of the members of this 
Commission and the interest and work of the boys and girls 
themselves that this work has been a success. 

Yours very truly, 

William B. Moore, 

Garden Supervisor. 



Hr. Charles S. Clark 

Chairman of the Public Welfare and Recreation Commission 

Somerville, Massachusetts. 

Report of the Annie E. McCarthy Neighborhood House. 

The work of the Annie E. McCarthy Neighborhood House 
is going on in a live, active way, and the vicinity of Poplar 
Street is benefiting by it. 

A Girls' Club having a membership of sixty makes the 
House its headquarters. The girls pay fifty cents a year dues, 
payable in two installments October first and February first. 
A few are allowed to become members without the fee when it 
is known that the money is hard for them to get. They meet 



WELFARE ANT) RECREATION COMMISSION. 297 

for social times and mutual helpfulness, and there is a fine 
spirit of co-operation growing up among them. 

On Monday afternoon a sewing class meets with Mrs. 
Holland as leader. In this class handkerchiefs are made from 
old muslin and when finished are sold for a penny apiece. 
Others made from new lawn or muslin bring two cents apiece. 

The gymn classes meet on Tuesday. A class of twenty 
little girls from seven to ten years of age, and a class of 
twenty older girls from twelve to fourteen years meet in the 
afternoon, and two classes of boys meet in the evening. These 
classes are held in the Bennett School. Most of the boys were 
a hard, unruly set of individuals, but they now show an im- 
provement in spirit and willingness to work together. 

Through the kindness of Miss Alice Fox, four girls are 
receiving private music lessons from Miss Coleman, who also 
conducts two kindergarten music classes. These lessons were 
given free at first, but now a charge of ten cents a lesson is 
made and the girls buy their own music. 

Wednesday evening is spent with games and entertain- 
ments at the House. An enthusiastic cooking class of eight 
girls meets on Thursday with Miss Emily Hood. Also on the 
same day a class in chorus singing is held under the direction 
of Miss Margerite Henis and Miss Mary Boika, two Jackson 
College students. 

On Fridays Miss Edith Fox conducts a class in sewing. 
The girls in this class have been making warm flannel night- 
gowns for their own use. Miss Hood also has another class in 
cooking on Fridays. 

One of the most important groups at the House is a club 
of twenty-eight women. They meet once in two weeks and at 
present their chief interest is a course in Home Nursing, with 
a Red Cross nurse acting as instructor. At Christmas time 
they made up seven baskets of food and clothing, which were 
taken to poor people. 

In all, about two hundred people take an active part in 
the affairs of the House, but the number who receive the good 
influence which the House broadcasts in the neighborhood is 
inestimable. 

It is around Mrs. W. L. Holland that the machinery of 
the House revolves. She has reached the hearts of the people 
and brought them together. And by keeping her faith with 
them she is gradually teaching them a spirit of kindness, a 
spirit of truth, and a spirit of co-operation. In other words 
she is leading them into the ways of good American citizen- 
ship. 

Bertha E. Keyes, 
Secretary for the Ways and Means Committee. 



298 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF THE SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



Office of Sealer of Weights and Measures, 
City Hall Armex, Somerville, January 1, 1923. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen: — 

The following report of the 1 sealer of weights and meas- 
ures for the year 1922 is respectfully submitted: — 

Work of Weights and Measures Department for 1922. 



Scales 
Platform over 5000 capacity 
Platform under 5000 capacity 
Counter 
Spring . 
Computing 
Slot personal 
Prescription 
Beam 
Track 

Weights, 
Avoirdupois 
Apothecary 
Metric . 

Capacity Measures 
Dry 

Liquid . 

Gasolene pumps . 
Oil pumps . 
Molasses pumps 
Ice cream cans 
Yard sticks . 

Baskets .... 

Leather measuring machine 

Totals .... 







Non- 


Con- 


Adjusted 


Sealed 


sealed 


demned 


1 


41 




— 


— 


23 


278 




15 


— 


27 


548 




5 


2 


7 


753 




7 


2 


15 


342 




3 


— 


— 


62 
38 
32 




— 


— 


48 


3262 








— 


553 
16 




— 


— 


— 


77 







4 


— 


879 




— 


15 


5 


93 and 


272 


stops 


18 


79 
31 




12 





— 


140 




— 


3 


— 


13 




. — 


— 


— 


1 




— 


— 



144 



7238 



42 



26 



Fees collected and paid to City Treasurer, f 619.79. 
Amount paid City Treasurer for Pedlers' Licenses, 



$959.00. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS ANT) MEASURES. 299 

Trial Weighing in Stores. 

Number Incorrect 

Commodity Tested Correct Under Over 

Coal in paper bags .... 36 25 10 1 

Coal in wagons — — — — 

Flour in paper bags .... — — — — 

Butter 30 30 — 

Dry commodities 207 178 25 4 

Bread 12 12 — — 



Totals 285 245 35 5 

Inspections: — 

Hawkers and Pedlers Licenses .... 161 

Ice dealers' scales ....... 48 

Coal certificates ....... 32 

Junk scales 25 

The decrease in number of capacity measures sealed in 1922 
as compared with number sealed in 1921 is due to the fact that 
ice cream containers are now sealed by the manufacturers 
under the provisions of Section 10, Chapter 98 of the General 
Laws. 

B. S. Abbott, 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



300 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF THE LAW DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable, the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Somerville: 

The annual report of the law department for the year 
ending December 31, 1922, is as follows: 

A bill presented to the legislature by the town of Dover 
asking to be taken out of the Metropolitan Park District 
passed both branches of the legislature. At my request the 
governor gave a hearing on the bill and I secured the pres- 
ence of representatives of many cities and towns who ex- 
pressed their opposition to the proposed legislation. The 
governor vetoed the bill and the legislature failed to pass it 
over his veto. If it had become a law other municipalities 
situated like Dover in respect to the district would have asked 
to be taken out and the result would probably have been a 
large increase of the contribution by Somerville to the ex- 
penses of the district. 

A bill was presented to the legislature providing for an 
extension of the Metropolitan Water District at an estimated 
cost of more than sixty millions of dollars. If this bill had 
been passed it would have added several millions of dollars 
to the obligations of Somerville. Every year of delay means 
a saving of many thousands of dollars in interest charges. I 
joined in the opposition and it failed to become a law at that 
session of the legislature. 

An act was passed by the legislature for widening a por- 
tion of Bridge street in Cambridge authorizing the work to 
be done by the County Commissioners of Middlesex County. 
A hearing was held by the County Commissioners and the act 
was accepted by them. It does not provide for any special 
assessment upon Somerville. 

An action for personal injuries mentioned in my report for 
the year 1921 in which there was a verdict of $9,000 was set- 
tled for |8,000. An action brought by a suspended member 
of the Fire Department was tried before a jury in the Mid- 
dlesex Superior Court and a verdict was given in his favor. 
An action brought by a member of the Fire Department to 



CITY SOLICITOR. 301 

test the validity of a regulation under the two-platoon law 
was argued before the full bench of the Supreme Court and 
a decision was rendered sustaining the reguation. 

A large tract of land was taken for a Junior High School 
on Marshall street by right of eminent domain, having a front- 
age of 300 feet and comprising 13 lots. Settlement of claims 
for damages were made with all the owners and conveyances 
by them to the city were recorded. 

A parcel of land on Marshall street formerly occupied by 
a fire station was offered for sale by the city and the title be- 
ing questioned the land was registered in the Land Court 
and the sale was carried through. 



Very respectfully, 

Frank W. Kaan,, 

City Solicitor. 



302 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF SOMERVILLE PLANNING BOARD 



December 31, 11)22. 
To His Honor, the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen. 
Gentlemen : 

As required by the provisions of Chapter 494 of the 
Acts of 1913 the Planning Board herewith submits its annual 
report, containing also suggestions and recommendations for 
the improvement of the City. 

During the year 11)22 two new members were appointed 
by His Honor, Mayor Webster, namely, John Williamson and 
Benjamin J. Surett. The Board organized for the year by 
re-electing William F. Riley Chairman and David J. Kelley, 
Secretary, the other members of the Board being George J. 
Rauh, .John Williamson and Benjamin J. Surett. 

During the past year the Planning Board held several 
meetings and discussed the various matters of public interest 
for the welfare of the city, which is herein set forth. Some 
of these matters have been mentioned in previous reports of 
the planning Board, but no action has as yet been taken in 
regard to their adoption by the Board of Aldermen. 

Fire Districts 

Although the importance of the enactment of an ordi- 
nance establishing tire districts has been repeatedly called to 
the attention of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen, nothing 
has been attempted, and no action taken, nor has the subject 
been considered during the past year. 

The Planning Board again earnestly recommends that 
some definite action be taken by the Board of Aldermen to 
provide proper fire protection for the city by establishing 
some fire districts without further delay. The Planning 
Board is ready to cooperate in every way with the Board of 
Aldermen in order to hasten action in this important matter. 

Public Parks and Playgrounds 

The Board again recommends that more small play- 
grounds be established in the different sections of the city 
for the exclusive use of small children. Particular attention 
is called to the necessity of providing a playground in Ward 
six, in the Morse School section. 

Somerville's only bathing beach at the Wellington 
Bridge on the Mystic River, although under the direction and 



PLANNING BOARD. 303 

control of the city has been so neglected that its usefulness 
as a bathing bench is doubtful. The beach needs to be sanded 
and cleaved of mud, so that the children and older people 
who use the beach can do so in safety and comfort. The 
city should either improve the beach, or turn its manage- 
ment over to the Metropolitan Park Commission. 



Mystic River Development 

The subject of the development of the Mystic River for 
commercial purposes has been discussed frequently in recent 
years, and efforts have been made from time to time to obtain 
the assistance of the National Government. 

In 1892 the United States government dredged a chan- 
nel in the Mystic River from the B. & M. Railroad bridge 
to the head of navigation or Craddock Bridge in Medford. 
This channel is about one hundred feet in width for about 
one mile, and gradually narrows in width until it is about 
fifty feet wide at the Craddock Bridge in Medford. At the 
Wellington Bridge in Somerville the channel is about fifty 
feet in width and the natural channel is about eight feet 
is about eight feet i)ee]) at mean low water. From the Boston 
& Maine Railroad bridge up to Craddock Bridge in Medford 
the river is very crooked and unsuitable for the navigation of 
vessels over one hundred fifty feet in length, and is not of 
sufficient depth to accommodate vessels of a size suitable for 
commercial purposes. 

Somerville has about thirty-six hundred feet of water 
front on the Mystic River. Part of this is owned by the 
Boston & Maine Railroad and private parties, and another 
part of it is controlled by the Metropolitan Park Commis- 
sion. The only shipping interest on the Mystic River in 
Somerville at the present time is the Somerville Coal Com- 
pany, which occupies Dennings Wharf, so called. The river 
is so winding and the draft so shallow that only barges of 
light draft can use the river for commercial purposes. 

In order to make the Mystic River suitable for ships 
which would be of sufficient size to be useful for commercial 
Ymrposes the channel of the river must be widened and 
dredged, as the existing channel is obviously inadequate. 

The United States government has refused to expend 
any money for this purpose in that part of the Mystic River 
running through Somerville and Medford for the following 
reasons : — 



304 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

1. Difficulty in navigation on account of the many bends in 
the river. 

2. The use of the largest part of the land on both sides of 
the river for park purposes. 

3. The small number of business concerns using the river in 
their business either in Somerville or Medford. 

As a remedy for this condition the Board suggests that 
your- Honorable body urge upon our representative in Con- 
gress the necessity of some action towards securing an ade- 
quate appropriation so that this water way with the adjoin- 
ing terminal facilities furnished by the Boston & Maine Rail- 
ad may be fully utilized, and the commercial interest of 
the City improved thereby. 

The Board strongly recommends that the city immedi- 
ately purchase the land north of the Wellington Bridge as 
the first step in the development of the river front. If the 
city acquires this land on the river front a bulkhead or pier 
could be built out into deep water by using the ashes or other 
filling now being dumped outside the city limits and thereby 
provide additional dumping facilities which would at the 
same time be of great value in reclaiming the marsh land 
and building a suitable wharf for the use of the City and 
business interests. 

Survey of City 

The Planning Board has considered the advisability of 
the enactment of a zoning ordinance which would correct the 
evils existing today on account of the absence of building 
regulations or restrictions. The subject is, however, very 
important, and should only be acted upon after having a com- 
prehensive survey made of the enitre city by a city planning 
engineer who would give an unbiased and disinterested report 
of conditions and suggest the establishment of zones based 
upon studies of the whole city. 

The comprehensive survey should cover the following 
subjects : 

(A) Business districts 

(B) Residential districts 

(C) Miscellaneous business and residential districts 

(D) Industrial sites 

(E) Population centres 

(F) Schools, public buildings and parks 

(G) Plan showing valuation of real estate by districts 
(H) Transportation facilities and streets 

(I) Water front 

(J) Building regulations 

(K) Fire Districts 

The survey should be illustrated by plans which would 
be of great assistance in working out a zoning ordinance, and 
planning for the future development of Somerville. 



PLANNING BOARD. 305- 

The draft of a zoning ordinance based on the facts 
found by the survey should be undertaken only after public 
hearing, to give all citizens an opportunity to be heard and 
to make suggestions. 

Zoning was discussed in our last year's report, and is 
fast becoming important to the life of every modern progres- 
sive city. Springfield last year spent $20,000. ; Worcester- 
spent about $28,000. and Newton spent about $10,000. in 
making a comprehensive study, and in providing a zoning 
ordinance to protect the property values and regulate the use 
of property for the benefit of all the citizens. 

Revision of Building Laws 

In connection with zoning, and as supplementary there- 
to a complete revision of our building laws should be under- 
taken, as both are necessary to accomplish the desired result. 
The construction of all buildings should be carefully consid- 
ered at the same time that the use to which the building may 
be put is determined by the zoning ordinance. 

In the opinion of the Planning Board there should be a 
preliminary survey of the city by an expert city planner, so 
that both the building laws and zoning ordinance would be 
framed with facts in the possession of the Board to assist it 
in framing such ordinances as would be for the best interests 
of the city for consideration and acceptance by the Board of 
Aldermen. 

Appropriation 

Somerville must do its share to provide for the welfare 
of its citizens, and the Planning Board is anxious to accom- 
plish some definite results by cooperating with the Board of 
Aldermen in recommending public improvements, but has 
been seriously handicapped by lack of cooperation on the 
part of the city government by its failure to provide sufficient 
appropriation to the Planning Board. If the work of the 
Planning Board is unnecessary and of no value to the citi- 
zens of Somerville, then the Board ought to be abolished, and 
no appropriation given to it, but if its work is of assistance, 
and is of value to the city the city government should not put 
Somerville in the saute class as a town of a few thousand 
inhabitants by appropriating $50. for the use of the Planning 
Board. The Planning Board can accomplish nothing with 
such a small appropriation, and returns it herewith to the 
Treasury of the City of Somerville. 

The Planning Board recommends that the city govern- 
ment appropriate $5000. for its use during the year 1923, so* 



306 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

that it may proceed along scientific lines, and with the aid 
of expert assistance submit to the Mayor and Board of Alder- 
men a comprehensive plan for the future development of Som- 
erville, and also a suitable zoning ordinance, so that Somer- 
ville may keep pace with the neighboring City of Cambridge 
in providing adequate laws for the future growth of the city. 
Necessarily the work of the Planning Board must be for 
the future. The results obtained the Planning Board be- 
lieves will be for the best interests of Somerville, and will in 
the long run result in saving money for the city. The appro- 
priation if given will be carefully used in accomplishing the 
desired results. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Williamson, Chairman 
George J. Rauh 
Benjamin J. Surett 
David J. KellEy, Secretary. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
CITY OF SOMERVILLE 



School Committee Rooms, December 18, 1922. 
Ordered, that the annual report of the Superintendent of 
Schools be adopted as the annual report of the Board of 
School Committee, it being understood that such adoption 
does not commit the Board to the opinions or recommenda- 
tions made therein; that it be incorporated in the reports 
of the City Officers ; and that 1,000 copies be printed separate- 

iy. 

Charles S. Clark, 

Secretary of School Board. 



308 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1922. 

Herbert Cholerton ........ Chairman 

Walter I. Chapman ....... Vice-chairman 



Members. 

EX-OFFICIIS. 



John M. Webster, Mayor, 
Enoch B. Robertson, 



President Board of Aldermen, 
ward one. 



76 Boston street, 
39 Highland road. 



Julia A. Crowley, 
Francis J. Fitzpateick, 

Daniel H. Bradley, 
Christopher J. Muldoon, 

Charles W. Boyer, 
Oscar W. Codding, 

Katherine C. Coveney, 
♦Richard L. Rice, 
t Ed ward I. Tripp, 

Harry M. Stoodley, 
Minnie S. Turner, 

Walter I. Chapman, 
Walter Frye Turner, 

Herbert Cholerton, 
Paul O. Curtis, 



ward two. 



WARD THREE. 



WARD FOUR. 



WARD FIVE. 



WARD SIX. 



WARD SEVEN. 



2 Austin street. 



19 Concord avenue. 
88 Concord avenue. 

66 Avon street 
59 Vinal avenue. 

73 Marshall street 

296V 2 Broadway 

21 Wigglesworth street. 

283 Highland avenue. 
64 Hudson street. 

18-A Central street. 
15 Highland road. 

94 College avenue. 
41 Mason street. 



Superintendent of Schools. 

Charles S. Clark. 



Office: City Hall Annex, Highland Avenue. 

Residence: 75 Munroe street. 

The Superintendent's office will be open on school days from 8 
to 5; Saturdays, 8 to 10. His office hour is 4 o'clock on school days, 
and 8:30 on Saturdays. 

Superintendent's Office Force. 

Mary A. Clark, 42 Highland avenue. 

Mildred A. Merrill, 26 Cambria street. 

H. Madeline Kodad, 104 Sharon street, West Medford. 

Marion E. Marshall, 30 Gilman street. 

Ruth O. Elliott, 4 Lincoln place. 

Marguerite E. Flanagan, 10 Auburn avenue. 



January 30. 
February 27. 
March 27. 



Board Meetings. 
April 24. September 25. 

May 29. October 30. 

June 26. November 27. 

8:15 o'clock. 



December 18. 



* Resigned September 25. 
t Elected November 16. 



309 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Standing Committees, 1922, 
NOTE. — The member first named is chairman. 

District I. — Fitzpatrick, Crowley, Bradley. 

PBESCOTT, HANSCOM, BENNETT. 

District II. — Muldoon, Bradley, Fitzpatrick. 

KNAPP, PEBRY, BAXTER. 

District III. — Boyer, Codding, Muldoon. 

POPE, CUMMINGS. 

District IV. — Rice, Coveney, Codding. 

EDGEBLY, GIJNE8. 

District V.-— Miss Turner, Stoodley, Coveney. 

FORSTER, BINGHAM, PROCTOR. 

District VI. — Chapman, Turner, Stoodley. 

CARR, MORSE, DURELT,, BURNS, BROWN. 

District VII. — Curtis, Cholerton, Chapman. 

HIGHLAND, CUTLER, LINCOLN, LOWE. 



High School — Chairman Bradley, Stoodley, Crowley, Codding, Cov- 
eney, Chapman, Cholerton. 

Finance — Chairman Stoodley, Fitzpatrick, Muldoon, Codding, Rice, 
Chapman, Cholerton, Webster, Robertson. 

Text Books and Courses of Study — Chairman Chapman, Muldoon, 
Crowley, Boyer, Coveney, Miss Turner, Curtis. 

Industrial Education — Chairman Boyer, Miss Turner, Crowley, Mul- 
doon, Rice, Turner, Curtis. 

School Accommodations — Chairman Codding, Rice, Fitzpatrick, Brad- 
ley, Stoodley, Turner, Cholerton, Webster, Robertson. 

Teachers — Chairman Cholerton, Chapman, Fitzpatrick, Muldoon, Cod- 
ding, Rice, Miss Turner. 

Health, Physical Training and Athletics — Chairman Curtis, Bradley, 
Fitzpatrick, Boyer, Coveney, Stoodley, Turner. 

Rules — Chairman Miss Turner, Boyer, Crowley, Bradley, Coveney, 
Turner, Curtis. 



310 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



TO THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE : 

Hereby is submitted an annual report upon the condi- 
tion of the public schools for the municipal year 1922. This 
is the fifty-first in the series of annual reports and is the 
fifteenth which I have written. As it is the custom of the 
School Committee to use this report as its own, I have pre- 
pared and present herewith the usual statistical tables, 
showing facts concerning pupils, teachers, and expenditures. 

The first thing to consider is the membership. The num- 
ber of pupils belonging to the day schools December 5 was 
14,419, an increase of 196 pupils over the number belonging 
at a corresponding time last year. The average membership 
for the school year ended June, 1922, was 14,004, an increase 
of 608 over the average membership of the preceding year. 
These figures, taken with those of the preceding year, repre- 
sent a steady growth in the membership of the schools. The 
following table shows distribution of the membership among 
the large divisions of the school system. 

Membership 

Junior Elementary Voca- 
High High including Kgn. tional Total Increase 

Dec. 1922 1962 3493 8878 86 14,419 196 

Dec. 1921 1966 3367 8766 124 14,223 

It will be noted that the membership of the High School 
is practically the same as that of last year at this time. 
This condition is especially significant when taken in con- 
nection with the fact that last year there was a double senior 
class numbering 631. The present senior class now numbers 
437. The present junior class numbers 634, and the present 
first year class 858. Last year these classes numbered 524 
and 794. The present senior class of the four Junior High 
Schools now numbers 1098, exceeding the membership of ]ast 
year by 85. These conditions indicate that the Senior High 
School is still growing. They also show a disposition on the 
part of the pupils to remain longer in school. 

The shrinkage in the Boys' Vocational School is due to 
the withdrawal of the students in training under the Rehabil- 
itation Act. • This withdrawal was due to a change in the 
policy of the Government in respect to training the veterans. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 311 

They are now being taught in a government school and the 
Boys' Vocational School now has only boys to deal with. 

Teachers 

Junior Elementary Voca- 
High High including Kgn. tional Total Increase 

Dec. 1922 71 116 226 9 422 1 

Dec. 1921 72 115 224 10 421 

Thirty-three teachers were elected during the last year, 
and were assigned as follows : High School 7, Junior High 
Schools 9, Elementary Schools 16, Boys' Vocational School 1. 
Twenty teachers resigned, — four to be married, twelve to ac- 
cept better paying positions elsewhere, four from other causes. 
Two teachers were transferred from the Junior to the Senior 
High School. Two were transferred from Elementary to 
Junior High School. There were two deaths and three retire- 
ments. 

The work of the schools during the past year has been 
successful to a high degree. With the exception of over- 
crowding in certain schools there have been no especially un- 
favorable conditions to meet. A brief review will be pre- 
sented to show in part what has been attempted and accom- 
plished in the several departments of the school system. 

Elementary Schools 

Under our present practice the elementary schools com- 
prise the kindergarten and the first six grades. These grades 
correspond to the years of childhood, stretching from 5 to 12 
years of age. During this time the children are characterized 
by great physical activity, robust health, and retentive mem- 
ory. It is a period when the forming of habits of obedience 
to authority, the mastering of details through repetition and 
drill, and the cultivating of the memory will constitute in 
a large measure the work of teachers and pupils. During 
this period the child will be engaged in acquiring the essen- 
tials of an education. These are reading, writing, language 
and spelling, arithmetic, geography, history, civics, hygiene, 
music, and drawing. Along with these studies goes instruc- 
tion in morals and conduct. These are the time-honored fun- 
damentals of education. They constitute the foundation up- 
on which the future structure must be built. There must be 
no skimping on these if the future work is to be solid and sub- 
stantial. 

On the other hand, with so much to be done by pupils 
and teachers with the wealth of material that is inviting con- 
sideration, it is necessary that methods be used which ensure 



312 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

to the highest degree the efficient and economical use of time 
and effort. Herein the modern elementary school differs great- 
ly from its predecessors. Much material has been eliminated 
from the subject matter of the various studies of this period, 
and improvement has been made in methods of teaching and 
study. Our teachers have been alive to both of these necessi- 
ties. They are keeping abreast of the times in both respects. 

Among the numerous interesting illustrations which 
could be given of the present methods of conducting elemen- 
tary school work the following are cited: 



History and Civics in Our Elementary Schools 

At my request, Mr. Knight, Supervising Principal of the 
Cutler, Lincoln, and Highland Schools, has furnished a state- 
ment quoted below: 

During the past year an effort has been made to improve 
our teaching of History and Civics. When we stop to think 
that the problem of democracy is a problem of education and 
that democracy rests upon education, then the teaching of 
these subjects becomes a matter of great importance. Since 
education must be for life and not merely for efficiency, our 
task is to develop each individual into an intelligent, self- 
controlled, and sanely-balanced member of society. 

"If we want democracy to succeed, we must educate for 
democracy. It is nothing short of treason to democratic in- 
stitutions to send forth from our schools young men and wom- 
en who know nothing of the responsibilities, duties, and privi- 
leges of citizens in a democracy, and of social conditions and 
ideals which are necessary for the success of democratic so- 
ciety." 

History skillfully and truthfully taught is its own preach- 
er. Our object is to awaken interest, encourage reading, pre- 
sent worthy ideals, and thus arouse patriotism. The aim of 
our teaching of Civics is to make the child see that his future 
welfare depends upon his possession of certain social virtues 
which will enable him to function efficiently in his own com- 
munity. However, care should be taken to give the child a 
vision beyond Somerville. He should realize that he is also 
a citizen of the state, and of the United States, and made to 
understand his responsibilities. 

The following course of study was formulated with these 
ideals in mind. It has been tried out during the past year 
in some of our schools, and later will be extended to all. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 315 

Course of Study in History 
FIRST GRADE 

1. The Home — Members of the family ; Their services to 
the home; Activities in the home; Manners applicable to the 
home; Dignity of home life. 

2. The Community — Activities which assist the home 

The grocer, baker, milkman, etc., 
in their relation to the home. 

3. Holidays 

The celebration of holidays should bring out our 
particular qualities of personal character and national ideals 
as exemplified in the persons involved. 

Thanksgiving, Christmas, St. Valentine's, Lincoln, 
Washington, Arbor and Bird Day. 

Others may be added to these at the discretion of 
the teacher. 

4. Civic Duties 

The training for citizenship will consist largely 
in training in morals and manners. The object of this work 
is the building of character. It aims to form habits and 
should be continuous and cumulative throughout the grades. 

Use and abuse of school building and property; 
Participation in school life: playground, fire drill; Coopera- 
tion with classmates; Respect for school regulations. 

SECOND GRADE 

1. The Community 

In relation to individual needs — Pood, Shelter, 
Clothing 

How these are supplied 

In relation to community needs — Protection (po- 
licemen, firemen, postmen) ; Service (water, lighting) ; Pleas- 
ures (parks, playgrounds); Education; Transportation. 

2. Indian and Eskimo life 

Contrast with our mode of living 

3. Holidays 

See First Grade 
Add Flag Day 

Study of our flag; Colors, Use, Care, Why we 
should love it, Salute. 



314 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

4. Civic Duties 

Respect for the rights of others in the community 
Daily walk to and from school; Use of side- 
walk ; Right and wrong places to play. 

Care of school and city property 

THIRD GRADE 

1. Local History 

First inhabitants — Indians 

First settlers of our city — From Whence; Occupa- 
tions : Homes : Neighbors ; Transportation ; Communication ; 
Descendants in school of early settlers. 

First buildings and streets 

Origin of name 

Contrast with present mode of living 

2. Holidays — Review; Add Memorial Day; Emphasize 
the story of the Pilgrims. 

3. Civic Duties — Proper conduct in public places 

Stealing rides on vehicles 
Visiting library, parks, etc. 
How to avoid accidents at home and 
on the street 

Proper treatment of new pupils at 
school and newcomers in the neighborhood, especially those of 
foreign birth. 



-& j 



FOURTH GRADE 

1. Local History — Review and strengthen work of third 
grade; Historic hills of Somerville, in their relation to its 
early history; Leading events of Somerville history; Historic 
landmarks: Powder House, Prospect Hill Tower, French Re- 
doubt, Greene House, Lee House, Ten Hills Farm; Dates: 
1842, 1872. 

2. National History — Story of Columbus in detail. 

3. Holidays — Review work of previous grades; Add Co- 
lumbus Day, and such holidays as are closely related to Som- 
erville history. 

4. Civic Duties — Important city officials and their du- 
ties; Special celebration of patriotic days; Relations and du- 
ties towards those less fortunate than ourselves: Junior Red 
Cross activities; Thrift: School Banking. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 315 



FIFTH GRADE 



1. Early Explorers — Review Columbus ; Americus Vespu- 
cius, naming continent; English: Cabots, Drake, Raleigh; 
Spanish: Balboa, Magellan, DeSoto; French: Champlain, Jo- 
liet and Marquette, La Salle. 

2. Colonization — Oldest towns: St. Augustine, Santa 
Fe; Virginia; New York; Massachusetts. 

3. Holidays — Continue and elaborate work of other 
grades. 

4. Civics — Economy in use of water and light; Wise 
use of leisure time; Fire; Prevention, Conduct in case of fire; 
Police; Dignity of force, Best ways of assisting them. 

SIXTH GRADE 

1. National History — Spain in America: Results of ex- 
plorations; England in America: Review colonies taught in 
fifth grade, take other colonies in story form ; France in Amer- 
ica: Results of explorations, reasons for conflict with Eng- 
land, leading up to French and Indian Wars ; French and In- 
dian Wars, very briefly, in story form; Revolutionary War 
by biography: emphasize causes and results. 

2. Local History — Show Somerville's part in important 
events of national history; Study of Flag. 

3. Holidays — See fifth grade. 

4. Civics — Necessity for paying taxes, rent, license fees; 
Wise use of telephone and telegraph; Significance of election 
day; Our relations with, and duties toward aliens; Written 
work in connection with Junior Red Cross; Participation in 
school government. 



Project Method and Socialized Recitation 

Another interesting way in which the work of the Ele- 
mentary Schools has been modified for the purpose of improv- 
ing the power of the pupils as well as increasing their knowl- 
edge, is shown in the use of the Project Method, the Socialized 
Recitation, Silent Reading, and Opportunity Classes. These 
methods have definite objectives. They are the means by 
which certain social values are attained and individual devel- 
opment promoted in connection with the study of regular 
subjects of the curriculum. How this work is carried on in 



316 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

some of the Elementary Schools, is shown in the following 
statement which I have asked Mr. Ryan, Supervising Princi- 
pal of District 2, to prepare: 

Four phases of modern educational practice appear to 
be worthy of especial mention in the schools of Ward Two: 

I. The application of the project method to the teaching 
of the regularly required subjects with a view to getting pu- 
pils into closer rapport with their environment by consider- 
ing subjects in "wholes" rather than in parts. 

For example, through the story of rubber — a project in 
Geography — worked out by the pupils, with each one making 
his small though important contribution to the "whole", ex- 
periencing thereby the joy of being a real worker in a group 
wherein his work counts, and finally having his work in Eng- 
lish, History, Spelling, etc., motivated unconsciously by the 
wealth of associations in such an experience, one learns the 
geography of South America in no uncertain way, and for 
all time. The pupil works not because of the fiat of the teach- 
er, but by the compelling power of his native curiosity or in- 
terest in a story, a " whole". 

II. The use of the Socialized Recitation as a means of 
developing a social consciousness. 

Personal responsibility, mutual toleration, a knowledge 
of the proper meaning and use of freedom are necessary for 
the individual if he is to be a real democrat within a de- 
mocracy. Through the Socialized Recitation the pupil has 
opportunity for the practice of these virtues in their broadest 
sense. The moment he neglects to practice them he finds him- 
self shut out by his comrades from participation in his class 
activities. The social consciousness is developed; one must 
practice the social virtues in order to be recognized by the 
"Chair" in the Socialized Recitation. 

III. The development of Silent Reading as a more ef- 
fective means of thought- getting. This is always accompanied 
by a time-reaction. Clippings from newspapers and maga- 
zines are used here. 

IV. Opportunity Classes. There are special classes 
usually held now from 3 :30 to 4 o'clock on certain afternoons. 
They are composed of small groups of pupils who need drill 
along some particular line. A pupil is discharged from this 
educational clinic as soon as he is ' 'cured", but may be re- 
admitted at any time for further treatment. 

I have found that these classes are not only helpful to the 
pupils as such, but are also helpful to the teachers because 
they are brought into close rapport with the pupils* actual 
needs. 



.SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 317 



Junior High Schools. 



The Junior High School or the intermediate school is 
a transitional school, the function of which is to insure for 
the pupil a gradual passage from childhood school experience 
into that of the secondary school stage. In the past strong 
criticism has been directed at the condition which made this 
change so sudden and violent. The Junior High School pro- 
vides gradual changes by means of which the child passes with- 
out shock from the elementary to the senior high school. But 
in addition to this, and more important than this, is the func- 
tion of the Junior High School to provide differentiations 
adapted to the varying needs, interests, and aptitudes of chil- 
dren. This variation is given by devoting a portion of the 
time to studies from which a child may make selection of 
what is most beneficial to him. 

About one fifth of the time is given to electives; the re- 
maining four-fifths are given to the subjects which all the 
children have in common. The course of study is so arranged 
as to give force to both of these ideas. Elective subjects be- 
gun in the Junior High School are continued in the Senior 
High School. Required subjects of the Junior High School 
are presented in ways which go on naturally and progressive- 
ly into High School. 

Tn order to give unity in all subjects in the work of the 
Junior and Senior High Schools, the heads of departments 
of the Senior High School have been placed in supervisory 
direction over the work in both schools. Frequent confer- 
ences are held by heads of departments with the teachers of 
the Junior High Schools by means of which a common under- 
standing is reached by all of the teachers of the several 
schools. 

In providing electives in the several years of the Junior 
High School care is taken to offer opportunity to children to 
change from one choice to another when it has been proven 
that such change is desirable. Flexibility is maintained to 
give the children the largest opportunity possible for self- 
discovery. In this way individual differences are provided for 
without the sacrifice of thorough work in required subjects. 
Experience has shown that while most children have made 
a permanent choice of electives by the beginning of the second 
year, others do not do so until well on in the Senior High 
School. While it is desirable to allow the child to cross over 
from one course to another, even as late as the junior year 
of the Senior High School, it is unreasonable for him to ex- 
pect to complete without loss of time a course chosen so late. 



318 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

In view of the fact that the Junior High School is a re- 
cent development in school organization, it is interesting to 
note that it is being adopted rapidly in all parts of the coun- 
try. An article in the November number of the "School Re- 
view" gives the result of a questionnaire sent out to all cities 
of the United States of 100,000 or more population; 68 in- 
quiries resulted in 60 replies. These replies showed that 20 
cities have Junior High Schools. Of the 34 which replied "no" 
to this question 20 reported that Junior High Schools would 
soon be established in their cities. The article concludes with 
this generalization: "The unanimity about Junior High 
Schools in the cities which have such schools in actual opera- 
tion is impressive. * * * * * Summarizing the status of Junior 
High Schools in cities of more than 100,000 it may be said 
that both the attitude and the action of the school men in 
these cities are distinctly in its favor. ***** From this 
evidence it appears ***** that the Junior High School 
is needed in the coming plan of organization for schooling 
pupils during the period of early adolescence." 

Various phases of the work of the Junior High School are 
shown by the following statements made by Junior High 
School masters : 

''We have continued the efforts set forth in the statement 
of our intentions last year and we reaffirm them at this time. 

Many things have interfered with our attempts at incor- 
porating extra curricula activities and we have now practical- 
ly decided to set apart for them an hour within the school 
day each week. 

Overtime work necessary because of crowded conditions 
and afternoon employment of many pupils have made it im- 
possible for many to attend the meetings that have been held 
thus far. 

Another impediment is the scarcity of rooms at our dis- 
posal, which tends to make the number of clubs comparative- 
ly small and the clubs themselves too large. It is hoped that 
the new building on Marshall Street will obviate this diffi- 
culty. 

We have been more successful in organizing classes for 
self-regulation. Evidences of this are noticeable daily. 

With the small appropriation made for encouragement of 
general sports, very little more than coaching the baseball 
team has been accomplished. To bring about the desired re- 
sult, much more must be done on suitably equipped play- 
grounds." 

Samuel A. Johnson, 
Master of the Eastern Junior High School. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 319 

"The efficiency of the past year's work in the Southern 
Junior High School will be measured by the success of its 
graduates who are now pupils in the Senior High School, and 
by the industry and faithfulness of those who have taken up 
some other kind of work. We hope to be able to give even a 
better equipment to those who go from us this year. 

'To give pupils a broad outlook upon the world's work, 
and to help them to ascertain their own aptitudes, interests, 
and abilities with reference thereto/ is one of the aims of the 
Junior High Course. To that end, incidentally 'to develop 
certain civic qualities, to meet health needs, and to prepare 
for the worthy use of leisure', perhaps the outstanding feature 
of this year's work at the Southern Junior High has been 
carried out along the lines of "extra curricula". Club life 
under the counselorship of the different teacher directors, de- 
velops the pupil along the line of his choice, the effort being 
made to give the pupil the largest possible freedom as to choice 
of club. The club-field covers a wide range of subjects, and 
furnishes territory, often virgin soil, where the pupil works 
out an interest which later develops into his life's work. 

Among our various Junior High activities, one of the 
most important projects supported by us is our school pa- 
per, "The Southern Bell", which is now in the third year of 
a very active and prosperous existence. Those teachers whose 
work it is to guide the Staff of pupils who carry on the publi- 
cation, have found a steady, marked improvement in the stand- 
ard of manuscript submitted for print. We are able each 
year to publish, with less effort, an eight-page, cardboard- 
covered magazine of recognized worth. 

Another aid to the growth of culture in our school is our 
Library, consisting of four hundred twenly non-fiction and 
two hundred seventy-six fiction, a total of six hundred ninety- 
six books placed on our shelves by the Public Library. Each 
class is assigned a Library Day when, accompanied by the 
Home Room teacher, books for home reading are discussed 
and taken out by the pupils. 

Noth withstanding the large variety of subjects to which 
the attention of the pupils is called, the Southern Junior High 
School intends to conserve fully the interest of the three R's. 

In the department of Practical Arts, the question of time 
to be given to shop work has arisen. In the seventh and eighth 
grades, every pupil is required to take two hours of shop 
work. There is no doubt that this requirement should be made 
in the seventh grade, the trying-out year. But after a pupil 
has been tested and found to have no aptitude for a particu- 



320 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

lar elective course, why should he be forced to spend two 
hours a week in it? A possible solution to this question may 
be found by making the Practical Arts course entirely elective 
in the eighth grade, as it is in the ninth." 

Geo. M. Wadsworth, 
Master of the Southern Junior High School. 



"Children entering this year from the sixth grades and 
private schools have come with minds tuned to the Junior 
High School ideals. The six-three-three system is so well 
established that the younger boys and girls are looking for- 
ward to differentiated courses and related activities. It is 
evident that this has led to a better and more regular attend- 
ance, for the child is interested and realizes absence will 
mean retardation in his elected subjects. 



We would recommend a summer school conducted by the 
school department of the city to assist those pupils who, for 
various reasons, wish to strengthen the work of the year or 
who are seeking for more rapid advancement. This feature 
of our school system would in a measure take the place of 
the teacher-coach, whom so many cities are employing in the 
Junior High Schools." 

Frank W. Seabury, 
Master of the Northern Junior High School. 



il I take pleasure in reporting that the past year has been 
a happy and prosperous one for the school. The attendance 
of the pupils for the year ending June 1922 was 95.5% ; for 
the first quarter of this year it was 97%. This proves that 
the pupils are greatly interested in their work and school 
and that the parents, for the most part, realize the impor- 
tance of regular attendance. 

I wish here to express my appreciation of the support 
which the parents of the pupils in this school have given in 
all the efforts of the master and the teachers to make this a 
live junior high school. 

One matter which has received attention recently from 
prominent educators is the time devoted to extra curricula 
activities. In order to provide for this modern development 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 321 

the periods of one day in the week have been shortened, there- 
by allowing for these activities within school time. Twenty- 
one Clubs were formed, namely: 



Dramatic 


f Latin 


Debating 


Glee 


Travel 


Orchestra 


Science 


Scout 


Fancy Work 


Knitting 


Busy Bee 


First Aid 


Basketry 


Story Tellers 


French 


Bird and Flower 


Civics 


Radio 


Carpentry 


Spanish 




School Paper 



These are carried on by the pupils under the direction 
of one or more teachers. Each pupil was required to make a 
choice of the activity in which he was most interested. Though 
this plan is in the experimental stage, many pupils have al- 
ready shown an increased interest in school work because of 
these activities. 

A library hour is one of the most valuable periods in a 
junior high school and, therefore, an hour has been set apart 
for this purpose in so far as is possible with the limited num- 
ber of teachers available. I recommend that an experienced 
teacher for this work be provided. 

As an evidence that the junior high school has helped to 
bridge the chasm formerly existing between the elementary 
and the high school, I draw your attention to the following: 

In June 1921 the Western Junior High School grad- 
uated 319 pupils; of this number 310 entered High School in 
September 1921. In June 1922 the Western Junior High 
School graduated 306 pupils ;. of this number 288 entered High 
School. 

As a result of the action of the School Committee in pro- 
viding a paid coach for the boys and another for the girls, a 
greater amount of work has been done in the way of physical 
development of the pupils. Better baseball, football and track 
teams have been trained, and more girls have taken part in 
tennis, basket ball, bat-ball, hikes and other interests. 

In spite of the noise, confusion, and dirt which neces- 
sarily accompany the construction of our new building, pu- 
pils and teachers are delighted with the prospect that corri- 
dor recitations and other inconveniences will soon be at end. 
We are to have an auditorium which will enable us to hold 
assembly periods of all pupils and to extend our physical ex- 
ercises, thereby giving the school opportunities which now are 



322 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

impossible. By the fitting up of the space under the hall a 
lunch room of sufficient size to accommodate all pupils will 
be provided. 

May I say in closing that the marked progress of the 
school has been due largely to the interest and united effort 
of the school committee, the superintendent, the parents and 
the efficient corps of teachers." 

Arthur L. Doe, 
Master of the Western Junior High School. 



High School 

The final division of the school system is the High School 
now known as the Senior High School. This organization 
consists of three years, and deals with youth of adolescent age. 

The activities of this school are divided into four gen- 
eral groups : college preparatory, commercial, general, and 
the household arts. Each of these courses is a continuation 
of work begun in the Junior High School. Each is well organ- 
ized and affords an opportunity for pupils to secure thorough 
training in the work best fitted for their needs and aptitudes. 
The work of the college preparatory department is planned 
to fit pupils for the varying kinds of higher institutions. Pu- 
pils enter colleges, universities, and normal schools, either by 
certificate or by examination. The record of the High School 
in these institutions is good. One hundred and thirty-four 
members of the last class entered the following higher insti- 
tutions of learning: 

Bates College, Boston College, Boston University, Dart- 
mouth College, Emerson College, Harvard University, Jack- 
son College, Lasell Seminary, Lowell Textile School, Massa- 
chusetts Agricutural College, Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, Mt. Holyoke College, New Hampshire State College, 
Normal Schools, Northeastern College, Radcliffe College, Sim- 
mons College, Smith College, Tufts College, and Wheaton Col- 
lege. 

The Somerville High School provides thorough drill for 
those who wish to prepare for admission to college but this 
work is done to meet the exactions placed upon the secondary 
school by the colleges themselves. The nature of these exac- 
tions is shown by the following statement furnished by Head- 
master Avery: 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 323 

"The Situation Regarding Preparation for College in a Comprehensive 
High School such as the Somerville High School 

"First, what is a comprehensive High School? This type 
of High School necessarily varies in different communities 
owing to the character of the community and the special in- 
dustry which is found there, but in general a comprehensive 
High School aims to supply pupils with any and all forms of 
secondary training for which the young people of the com- 
munity have use, with the reservation that such a school is 
not vocational and does not aim to train primarily for spe- 
cial industries and occupations. To explain still further, the 
comprehensive High School should train young people to con- 
tinue their studies in higher institutions ; to go into business 
with a fair basic knowledge of business demands and customs ; 
to have for the girls, a knowledge of the various phases of home 
making; for the boys of manual tendencies, a general funda- 
mental knowledge of manual arts, particularly with reference 
to the special industries of the community; or to provide a 
broad fundamental training along general lines. These dif- 
ferent types of efforts are in general characterized as courses, 
— the Preparatory, the Commercial, the Domestic Science, the 
Manual Arts, and the General. Of these, the Commercial 
Course comes the nearest to being vocational, since it does 
send out into business offices stenographers, typists, bookkeep- 
ers, and general office workers; yet the aim of the course as 
a whole is to give to pupils an understanding of stenography 
or business principles rather thiin to train for a particular 
type of business or office. 

I shall discuss the first only of these courses, although 
much can be said about and many improvements suggested in 
all of them. 

Few, outside of those making a special study of the re- 
quirements of higher institutions, understand the conditions 
imposed on secondary schools in training boys and girls to 
continue their studies in college, scientific schools, normal 
schools, etc., or the little leeway given the secondary school, 
once a pupil has selected the particular college for which 
he wishes to prepare. 

If the pupil could alwavs decide at an early age that he 
wanted to continue his education after high school, if he 
could definitely select his college and never change, if he and 
his parents could be made to know that a high school diplo- 
ma does not insure entrance to college, and if only the bright- 
er pupils desired to attend college, the task of the high school 
would be simple indeed. 



324 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

In the eastern states especially, the requirements for 
entrance to college are very explicit and vary considerably for 
different colleges. Harvard, Radcliffe, and Wellesley repre- 
sent one type and perhaps the most exacting; Dartmouth an- 
other, Boston University, Brown, and Tufts another; and the 
Institute of Technology still another. Any pupil of good 
ability should be able to enter any of these colleges if he 
makes his choice early enough and works hard. His decision 
to go to college should be made not later than the beginning of 
the last year of the Junior High School, as the preparation 
demands at least four years' work, and his choice of college 
should be made finally upon entrance to the Senior High 
School. Pupils who do not decide to go to college until they 
enter the Senior High School must expect to take an extra 
year after graduation in order to satisfy the requirements. 

Parents often think that a high school diploma is all that 
is necessary to gain admission to college. This fallacy should 
be suppressed early in the Junior High School. Pupils in or- 
der to satisfy the college must do much better than passing 
work and must do much more than the amount of work just 
necessary for securing a High School diploma. 

The rigorous and exacting requirements imposed by the 
colleges make college preparation very difficult and fill the 
short school day to repletion. Little opportunity is, therefore, 
granted the college-bound pupil to indulge in the so-called 
extra-curriculum activities of the high school, such as music, 
debating, work on the school paper, dramatics, etc. In this 
respect pupils of the preparatory course are largely deprived 
from taking part in many of the broader activities of the- 
school and from securing that all-round preparation which 
gives them the best foundation for valuable citizenship and 
efficient membership in society. In brief, college preparation 
is narrowing rather than broadening, — in general, uninspira- 
tional. 

Even with these limitations, college statistics show that 
public high school trained young men and women do better 
work in college than those from private preparatory schools. 

What is the solution of this problem? A longer school 
day would help somewhat and that seems all that one can 
suggest under present conditions. Even that would be at- 
tended with some risk as time would thereby be taken by some 
from needed physical exercise or home study. 

A real solution must come from the colleges through a 
readjustment of the requirements, a letting up of the gruel- 
ling and deadening repetition in the languages, the substitu- 
tion of interesting authors in both ancient and modern Ian- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 325 

guages, the study of modern history, social sciences, and the 
problems of citizenship, and a recognition of the value of a 
real study of music, debating, or art. 

May the day soon come when all the courses in a high 
school may fit for citizenship and a real appreciation of right 
living." 

The Commercial Department. This department provides vo- 
cational training in bookkeeping, typewriting, and stenogra- 
phy. A pupil who has taken the regular course in these sub- 
jects can easily find employment upon graduation, and can 
meet all the requirements which it is reasonable to expect 
a beginner of the age of a high school graduate to have in 
any of these subjects. Pupils of the commercial department 
of the graduating class are required to spend one week in 
office work during the senior year. These pupils by their 
work in the City offices, have clearly demonstrated their ef- 
ficiency in stenography and typewriting, and in their ability 
to meet office requirements usually placed upon a beginner. 
Some graduates of the high school attend commercial schools, 
either to specialize in advanced work or to complete the 
course which they have begun too late to finish before grad- 
uation. Such instances in no way reflect upon the work of 
the school. They are variations of the rule which is that 
completion of the commercial course of the Somerville High 
School fits a pupil to begin work in some one of the three 
branches taught. 

The General Course. The general course affords an oppor- 
tunity for pupils who for any reason plan to defer specializ- 
ing until after graduation. This course is rich in material 
and affords a fine opportunity for study and improvement 
under good conditions. 

The Household Arts Course. This department is of recent 
development in the hi^rh school. It is fully explained in the 
report made by the Director of Household Arts. In this 
course a girl divides her time equally between a group con- 
sisting of dressmaking, millinery, cooking, household eco- 
nomics and other related subjects, and a group of academic 
studies taken from the general curriculum. It is valuable 
not alone on account of the special training which it provides 
but also for the reason that it fits girls to enter a variety 
of vocations upon graduation, wherein they can be self-sup- 
porting until the time for home-making arrives. 

Extra Curricula Activities 

Personal development of the students of the High School 
in initiative, self-reliance, executive ability, and social co- 



326 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

operation, is promoted by certain activities which the stu- 
dents themselves conduct. These are commonly classed as 
extra curricula activities. What is being done in the High 
School along this line is shown in the following statement 
which has been prepared, with the approval of the Head- 
master of the High School, by Stephen H. Mahoney, a mem- 
ber of the High School Faculty: 

The Extra Curricula Activities of the 'Somerville High School 

Besides the regularly prescribed activities there are 
many undertakings connected with the High School course 
which are open to the pupils. These activities are conducted 
by the pupils themselves, but are under the guidance or super- 
vision of members of the faculty. The administration of the 
High School fosters and encourages these miscellaneous un- 
dertakings as helpful to the pupils from a cultural, recrea- 
tional, or scientilic standpoint. 

The Students' Council is the representative organization 
for the entire membership of the school. The four officers 
of each class, namely, the president, vice-president, secretary, 
and treasurer are ex-officiis members of the council. In addi- 
tion there are six members known as Floor Proctors, each 
proctor representing the rooms on one floor of each of the 
High School buildings. The Council in its representative 
capacity acts for the student body in offering suggestions to 
the Headmaster and Faculty relative to student cooperation 
in school affairs. Illustrations of the work of the Council 
are: planning methods of filing to and from recitations, pro- 
curing posters and mottoes for school activities, conducting 
school assemblies for the promotion of some particular un- 
dertaking, acting as ushers at assemblies and public gather- 
ings, and acting as monitors in the fire drill. The projects 
of the Council are transmitted to the pupils of the school 
through the medium of Proctors, each home room in the school 
building being represented by a Proctor selected from the 
membership of the room. 

In addition to the Students' Council, as has been inti- 
mated above, each of the three classes in the High School has 
its own organization for the administration of class affairs. 
The class officers, namely, a president, vice-president, secre- 
tary, treasurer, editor, and assistant editor are elected an- 
nually by ballot. Each election is conducted in accordance 
with the custom of municipal and state elections, the candi- 
dates being placed in nomination by the filing of the proper 
papers and, in the case of the senior class, the election is 
conducted at a city polling booth under the supervision of 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 327 

student election officials. Each class conducts its own meet- 
ings during the school year as occasion demands, the routine 
work being attended to by the officers. 

Chief among the literary activities of the school is the 
publication of a school paper, "The Radiator/' This paper 
which is issued monthly is managed entirely by students. 
This publication serves as a journal for recording school activ- 
ities, and as a medium for promoting interest and coopera- 
tion among the pupils. 

The Boys' Debating Society, with an active membership 
of about fifty pupils, aims to foster practice in public speak- 
ing, to train the boys in logical reasoning, and to promote 
interest in public questions. Meetings are held weekly in 
the school building, and in addition the society usually com- 
petes in one or more contests with other schools. 

The Girls' Debating Society serves the same purpose for 
the girls of the school. This organization is a member of a 
triangular league, the other members being representatives 
of the Newton and Brookline High Schools. These three 
schools meet annually in a triangular contest. 

The Somerville High School Players' Club is a recently 
organized undertaking in the school. With a membership 
of approximately 125 pupils, its purpose is to promote in- 
terest in dramatic activities. Included in its membership 
are pupils representing the Art Department, the Dressmak- 
ing Department, and the Manual Training Department, thus 
enabling the organization to procure within its own ranks the 
costumes, scenery, and stage property essential to the pres- 
entation of plays. 

The Somerville High School Orchestra heads the list of 
musical activities. Its membership of sixty pieces is drawn 
from the pupils in the school capable of playing orchestral 
instruments. Most of the players have already been mem- 
bers of similar organizations in the Junior High School Sys- 
tem and accordingly have profited by such experience. The 
orchestra is under the supervision of the director of music, 
and aims to teach concert playing for both school affairs 
and other functions which have the sanction of the School 
Committee. 

The School Band with a membership of approximately 
thirty-five pupils rehearses weekly and furnishes music for 
many of the school activities, particularly those of an out- 
door nature. The band is also occasionally called upon to 
render music for parades and other undertakings which have 
the approval of the school authorities. 

The Fife and Drum Corps is a boys' organization which 



328 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

renders music chiefly for the physical training activities of 
the school, particularly those of an outdoor character. It is 
composed of 40 pupils who meet weekly for instruction and 
rehearsal. 

The Fife, Drum and Bugle Corps is a similar organiza- 
tion for girls, and alternates with the boys' organization in 
furnishing field music. There are at present about 40 mem- 
bers in the corps. 

The Mandolin Club is composed of 24 pupils who play 
the stringed instruments. Its purpose is to provide pleasure 
for its members in concert playing and also to furnish an- 
other type of entertainment at school functions. 

The Boys' Glee Club has a membership of 30 and meets 
weekly for rehearsal. Its objective is socialized concert sing- 
ing for the purpose of the pleasure it affords those partici- 
pating, as well as for the purpose of rendering selections in 
public. 

The Girls' Senior Glee Club numbers 80 members from 
two upper classes in the High School and serves the same 
purposes as the similar organization among the boys. 

The Girls' Junior Glee Club secures its membership from 
among the first year pupils. Its present membership is ap- 
proximately 45 girls. 

The Somerville High School Athletic Association is the 
medium through which the pupils support the major athletic 
activities of the school. An executive committee, on which 
the students and alumni are represented, conducts the ad- 
ministrative business of the association. Under its super- 
vision Baseball, Football, Hockey. Basket Ball, and Track 
activities are conducted for the boys of the school. TJhis 
association conducts its work in cooperation with and under 
the direction of the School Committee. 

The Girls' Athletic Association is a similar organization 
for the purpose of promoting athletic activities for girls. Its 
organized undertakings thus far include Tennis, Basket Ball, 
and Field Hockey, and in addition it has conducted informal 
bikes, swimming groups, toboggan parties, and similar activ- 
ities. 

The "S" Man's Club is a newly formed society in the 
school. All athletes who have been awarded letters by the 
Athletic Association are eligible to membership. The pur- 
pose of the club is to cooperate with the school faculty in 
the conduct of athletic undertakings, to promote a better 
feeling among those participating in school athletics, and to 
exert its influence in general school affairs. 

The School Bank is the medium througli which thrift 
is encouraged among the pupils. At a stated time in the 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 329 

week's program a brief period is provided during which the 
pupils of the school are encouraged to make regular deposits 
in the bank or its sub-stations which are conveniently located 
throughout the school. 

The French Club was organized to stimulate interest in 
the French Language, and give opportunity for speaking 
French in recitations, dialogues, plays, songs, etc., and to 
help pupils to gain confidence and to become better ac- 
quainted with teachers and fellow pupils. 

The Chess Club has at present a membership of 25 boys 
and meets weekly to promote interest in this scientific game. 
Matches with other schools are occasionally arranged. 

The Radio Club is now in the process of organization. 
Its objective is to instruct pupils who are interested in the 
subject of Radio to build or improve Receiving Sets and also 
to provide instructions in the reading of the Radio Code 

The Art Club is the most recent organization in the 
school and is not yet sufficiently established to report its ac- 
complishments. Its function will be to promote interest in 
art as an asset to culture and also to assist other school activ- 
ities by furnishing posters and like material. 

Vocational School 

Under the State Law any child fourteen years of age or 
over is entitled to attend a vocational school in his own town 
or elsewhere in the state, provided his own town does not 
maintain the type of school which he wishes to attend. In 
the latter case, the home town must pay the tuition for every 
such pupil to the town maintaining the school which the pu- 
pil attends. Somerville has for a number of years maintained 
a day Vocational School for Boys. For a number of years 
it also maintained a day Vocational School for Girls, but in 
October, 1919, this school was closed and in its place a de- 
partment of Household Arts was established in the High 
School as a vocational opportunity for girls. Under present 
conditions, then, the local youth may choose between attend- 
ing the vocational school maintained by the City of Somer- 
ville or attending some other type of vocational school main- 
tained in other communities. At present, attendance of Som- 
erville youth at day vocational schools is as follows : 

In Somerville Day Vocational School 90 

Household Arts, S. H. S 34 

In Boston 14 

Of the number of pupils attending the Boys' Vocational School 52 
are residents of Somerville and 38 of other co:mn>unities. 



330 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Five departments are maintained : academic, wood-work- 
ing, machine-shop, automobile repairing and mechanical draw- 
ing. The school is well equipped, has competent instructors, 
and prepares boys to enter the trades as advanced appren- 
tices. Its course of instruction is three years in length. Un- 
der the rules of the Department of Education, fifteen pupils 
is the maximum number to be taught by a trade instructor. 
While the present school plant is so occupied that there is 
no room for additional classes, there is room for additional 
pupils in a number of the departments.. 

The possibility of increasing the scope and influence of 
this school is great. Such development can only come, how- 
ever, as a result of greater appreciation of this type of school 
on the part of parents whose boys would find their best ca- 
reers in industry. In a community where construction is one of 
the greatest enterprises in which the people are engaged, well- 
trained tradesmen are essential to its welfare and progress. 
Honorable careers of usefulness and profit are open to such 
workers. The Vocational School for Boys gives a chance to 
learn the elements of a trade and at the same time to advance 
in academic study. It is possible, of course, to develop this 
school by the addition of a year to its course of study should 
the public demand therefor be sufficient. In the same degree, 
instruction in other trades could be added, thereby increasing 
the opportunities for boys to prepare to earn a living and to 
get academic instruction at the same time. 

Continuation Schools 

In a referendum vote in 1919, the people of Somerville 
decided to accept the provisions of the law in reference to 
continuation schools, and in September 1920 such schools 
were opened by the School Committee. Two kinds were pro- 
vided, one for girls and one for boys, each having two teach- 
ers. The classes were located in the High School building, 
each using two rooms. The equipment of the two schools 
was furnished mainly by transfer from the High School. To- 
day both schools are located in the High School building, 
and improvement has been made in the space provisions made 
for them. Under the law, all children fourteen to sixteen 
years of age, who are at work, must attend Continuation 
School four hours every week, in the town where they are 
employed. As many of our youth work in other places than 
Somerville, not all of them are in our Continuation Schools. 

The present membership of our schools is as follows: 
Boys, 88; Girls, 48. Both schools are organized in two 
general departments, academic and practical arts. The work 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 331 

in both departments is well organized and holds the attend- 
ance and interest of the youth who attend the schools. 

One element of difficulty in the management of these 
schools is the problem of the twenty-hour pupil. Under the 
law a child fourteen to sixteen years of age who is out of 
work must attend Continuation School twenty hours a week. 
As there is a good deal of variability among the individuals 
of this group, due to the fact that changes of employment 
and idleness are constantly occurring, it is difficult in schools 
as small as ours to arrange satisfactory programs for these 
pupils. The problem, however, has been handled as well as 
possible under the conditions now obtaining. Future devel- 
opments may point to ways of improvement in this matter. 

t 

Americanization 

Classes in English for adults of foreign birth have been 
conducted in accordance with the general plans which have 
been developed in the two preceding years. So far as the 
organization goes, an attempt has been made to provide the 
most convenient opportunity possible for those who wished 
to learn the English language. Classes have been conducted 
in school buildings in the evening, in factories wherever ar- 
rangements to that end could be made, and in schoolhouses 
and homes during the day. A special effort has been made 
to provide afternoon classes for mothers and interesting re- 
sults have followed this attempt. A class in citizenship was 
conducted in the Morse School with an attendance of 22 men, 
of whom 21 passed the examination for final papers. Two 
supervisors have visited the homes of many non-English speak- 
ing families to spread information about these classes and to 
create a friendly attitude towards our language and customs. 
A very eager spirit has been shown by all of those who attend 
these classes and a strong desire to become acquainted with 
the English language and identified with our habits and com- 
munity life. The classes average 67 sessions a year. General- 
ly the attendants of these classes are sorry to have the ses- 
sion come to a close. In looking for a justification for con- 
ducting this work at public expense one would have to esti- 
mate the following values : 

(a.) A considerable number of men have qualified for 
citizenship through the instruction received in these classes. 

(b.) A much larger number have improved their knowl- 
edge of English and thereby have increased their value not 
alone to themselves but also to the other members of the com- 
munity. 

(c.) All of the attendants have gained in knowledge of 



332 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

and sympathy for our institutions and have thereby become 
more identified with our interests. 

The work in Somerville has been conducted in harmony 
with the general plans formed by the Department of Educa- 
tion for the carrying on of this work throughout the state. 
These state plans indicate that the problem of educating the 
foreign-born in the English language and customs is regarded 
as of large importance to the future welfare of the state. 
In connection with the meeting of the N. E. A. in Boston a 
conference of leaders in Americanization work lasting two 
days was held. The general state of this undertaking through- 
out the country was considered. The common opinion was 
that this work is necessary and should be pushed vigorously 
among all people of foreign speech residing in this country. 
This opinion was maintained on grounds of national interest 
as well as on grounds of the interest of the newcomers them- 
selves. The local work is in harmony then with the purposes, 
plans of organization, and methods of procedure which are 
approved by the workers in this field both in the State and 
the Nation. 

* 
Night School 

Night schools now include the Evening High School, ele- 
mentary academic classes, vocational classes for men and 
women, and Americanization classes. This enumeration shows 
a change in the character of night school instruction from the 
type formerly given, which was mainly academic. The Eve- 
ning High School has been conducted on the general lines 
followed in previous years. The membership has been some- 
what larger than last year, and has been made up of earnest 
young men and women. Never has there been more interest 
in the subjects studied or better progress made by the stu- 
dents. ■ 

The classes in strictly elementary work were only two in 
number, one at the Bell School and one at the Western Junior 
High School. In this department of Evening School under- 
taking a considerable shrinkage is shown from the numbers 
of earlier years. It is probable that the local native-born 
youth advance so far in school before leaving that the kind 
of night school instruction they desire to obtain will be found 
in the high school rather than in elementary grade work. This 
condition is no reflection upon the organization or offering 
of the Evening Schools, but is an indication of the change of 
day school conditions. 

The vocational evening classes have been conducted for 
men and women. Those for the men have been located in 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 333 

the Vocational School for Boys, and consisted of classes in 
machine shop practice and automobile mechanics. The Voca- 
tional School for Women consists of classes conducted in the 
High School building, and in the Western Junior High School. 
The subjects offered are dressmaking and millinery. These 
classes are well attended and are meeting a very positive de- 
mand. All vocational classes, whether held in the day or 
evening, are conducted in co-operation with the State Depart- 
ment of Education under the plan by which the State pays 
one-half of maintenance cost. 

Atypical Classes 

Section 46, Chapter 73, General Laws of Massachusetts 
is as follows: 

"The school committee of every town shall annually as- 
certain, under regulations prescribed by the department and 
the commissioner of mental diseases, the number of children 
three years or more retarded in mental development in attend- 
ance upon its public schools, or of school age and resident 
therein. At the beginning of each school year, the committee 
of every town where there are ten or more such children shall 
establish special classes for their instruction according to 
their mental attainments, under regulations prescribed by 
the department." 

Before the enactment of this law Somerville already had 
established three classes for such children. These have al- 
ways been full but have taken care of only a fraction of the 
number of children for whom such classes are intended. During 
the summer of 1921 a psychological clinic began work in Som- 
erville under the direction of the Department of Education 
and has continued in operation ever since. As the members 
of this clinic devote only part-time to this city, the progress* 
of the work is necessarily slow. 

It has, however, completed the examination of a number 
of children and has made definite report upon them. At the 
present time the situation is as follows: 

Thirty-seven additional children have been declared to 
be eligible for this type of school. One hundred thirty-nine 
more children have been reported for and are waiting exami- 
nation. Without doubt a large part of these children will 
be found to be three years or more retarded. It is apparent 
from this review of the matter that a considerable problem 
must be met and solved in the near future. With fifteen 
pupils to a class there are now enough of these children to 
make two additional classes. This number will be increased 
as the examination progresses. Consequently we shall be 



09 



34 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

called upon to provide additional classes, probably at least 
four or live in number. With an undertaking of this size to 
be handled, methods of organization will necessarily have to 
be considered. At present the three classes are piaced sep- 
arately in different parts of the city, each conducted as an in- 
dependent unit. Each receives and teaches pupils of various 
ages and stages of physical and mental development. This 
arrangement has, in the past, been necessary for various rea- 
sons. The classes have done the work for which they were 
established as well as possible under such conditions, but with 
the larger undertaking to be managed a different scheme of 
organization should be followed, and very much more should 
be done for these children. As soon as circumstances will 
permit, all of these classes should be gathered in one build- 
ing, the work should be graded by age or capacity, and more 
adequate provision of handwork equipment should be pro- 
vided. Such an arrangement would be more economical so 
far as the needed equipment is concerned and it would pro- 
vide opportunities for older children of this type which they 
do not now have. 



Sight Saving Class 

In accordance with plans disclosed in the last annual re- 
port the sight saving class was established by the School 
Committee last June. This class is located in the Highland 
School and is properly equipped and has at present an attend- 
ance of ten pupils. 

As the children who ought to attend this class are scat- 
tered about the city, it becomes with some of them a prob- 
lem how to get to the school. Parents of some who attend 
are asking for transportation because they are not able to 
meet the daily expense for carfare. It is the practice in other 
communities where such classes are conducted to provide 
carfares. In order that this school may fully meet the pur- 
poses for which it is established, it is desirable that carfares 
be provided for those pupils who live at a long distance from 
the school. 

Attendance 

For the first quarter of the present school year, the per- 
centage of attendance for all the day schools of the city, with- 
out the Continuation Schools, was 95.9%. The percent of 
average attendance for the school year ended June 30, 1922, 
was 94.2%. This is the highest annual percent since 1915, 
when it was 94.5 % . The percent of average attendance since 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 335 

that vear is as follows: 1910, 93.4; 1917, 93.7; 1918, 92.2; 
1919, 91.2; 1920, 91.9; 1921, 93.6; 1922, 94.2. 

The low rate of attendance during the war and shortly 
after may have been caused by the general unrest or by the 
fact that many children had part-time jobs after school tak- 
ing their attention in a large part, away from the thoughts 
of school obligations. The present rate shows an improve- 
ment over former conditions. Apart from the change in the 
times, various other reasons contribute to better attendance. 
Teachers are making extra exertions to secure good attend- 
ance and they are having greater success than attended sim- 
ilar movements during the years just passed. One of the 
important lessons to be learned during childhood is the value 
of constant and sustained response to duty. School offenders 
of all sorts are usually found among those whose attendance 
is' poor. Most juvenile court cases are those of children who 
are out of school either through truancy or irregular attend- 
ance. Most successful scholarship is found among children 
whose attendance is constant. These facts indicate clearly 
the importance of regular attendance. The schools cannot 
train the child who is absent nor can the home make up to 
the child the loss which absence causes. There is, therefore, 
the strongest reason for the closest cooperation between home 
and school in the matter of insuring the regular attendance 
of all children. 

Thrift 

Instruction in thrift has been given in all the schools even 
more vigorously this year than at any other time. The results 
of this work are gratifying. The methods employed and the 
amounts deposited in the school savings bank are shown in 
the following statement prepared by George I. Bowden, Chair- 
man of a Committee of Supervising Principals on Thrift : 

I submit the following report for the Committee on School 
banks for the year of 1922. The present year has been, on the 
whole, a year of progress. 

School banking is now carried on in all of our schools 
and its value to the children is better appreciated by the 
teachers than ever before. At first this undertaking was 
looked upon by many of us as a troublesome interruption in 
an already over-crowded day. It is now regarded as a very 
important and helpful aid in forming the valuable habit of 
thrift in our pupils. 

The fact that so many of our people are spending their 
money as fast and in many cases faster than they are earning 



336 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

it is looked upon by many of our most thoughtful men as a 
danger to the very foundations of our social and economic 
order. 

The schools have a very important duty to the rising 
generation in this matter. It is not enough to give them the 
power to earn more money, for it is known beyond a doubt 
that the better the children are educated the greater will be 
their earning power. We must teach them the value of money, 
how to spend it wisely, how to save and safely invest a 
part of it. 

That $38,934.10 has been deposited in the Somerville 
Institution For Savings by 4400 children is a very convinc- 
ing fact to show that thrift is being taught in our schools. 

We are sure that a means of depositing the children's 
savings at frequent periods, such as is afforded bv the school 
banks, is essential to this instruction, for the amount saved 
during the summer vacation is much less than that saved 
in the same length of time when the school banks are in 
operation. 

The number of children in our schools who are deposi- 
tors is not as large as it is in many communities that have 
school banks. 

Is not the number of children who are learning to save 
of greater importance than the total amount saved? Can- 
not this number be increased during the coming year? 

Health 

The health of public school children is the joint concern 
of the School Committee and the Board of Health. More 
remotely, it is a concern also of the Commissioner of Public 
Buildings, who has charge of the school buildings including 
sanitary conditions, heating, lighting, and furniture. The 
Board of Health employs and directs the school physicians. 
It also employs two school nurses. The direction of the 
school nurses, however, is through the courtesy of the Board 
of Health exercised by the Superintendent of Schools. The 
School Committee has charge of all the school activities de- 
signed to promote the health of pupils through instruction, 
physicial training, and general care. Health instructions 
are given in accordance with a course in hygiene extending 
through the elementary schools, and the first two years of 
the Junior High. Physical training exercises are conducted 
(or the purpose of promoting physical development and 
health. These exercises are conducted under the direction 
of a Director, Assistant Physical Director, and two cadet 
teachers. The Assistant Physical Director has charge of the 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 337 

extension work in games and athletics designed to promote 
participation by pupils in outdoor games after school. The 
plan Cor this work which was adopted by the School Board 
at the January meeting has been carried on during the year. 
Many obstacles have prevented the rapid and successful de- 
velopment of this plan. None of them have been of a na- 
ture, however, permanently to retard the work. With the 
experience of this year to guide us it ought to be possible 
lor those in control of this matter to make a larger showing 
next year. Health work in the schools has received emphasis 
by the entrance into this field, this year, of the State De- 
partment of Education. This department has appointed of- 
ficers whose function it will be to promote the interests of 
this work throughout the state. Without going further into 
details of this matter, I wish to report that much interesting 
and successful effort is being put into this part of the school 
undertaking, and that the importance of the physical de- 
velopment and health needs of the pupils of the public schools 
is likely to grow in importance and the amount of attention 
demanded for. it. There are some important questions now 
requiring consideration and answer. These will, doubtless, 
be considered by the School Committee during the coming 
year. 

Credits for Music 

In 1919 the School Committee authorized the giving of 
diploma credits in the High School for outside study of mu- 
sic. A method of procedure was carefully prepared and the 
plan was put into operation in the following September. As 
this work has been going on now for two years, some idea 
can be obtained of the interest which pupils have taken in 
this opportunity and of the extent and character of the work 
in music which has been fostered thereby. Therefore, I have 
asked Wesley A. Maynard, High School Instructor in Band 
Music, an enthusiastic believer in the value of the study of 
music, to write a statement about the present status of this 
work. His statement follows : 

Credited Music in the Senior High School 

Since the School Committee, in the summer of 1919, au- 
thorized the giving of credit for music in the High Schools, 
there has been a constant growth of interest, yearly increase 
in the number of pupils enrolling for credit, and steady im- 
provement in results attained. 

This year 75 pupils have been entered by their parents; 



338 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

or guardians for the two points of credit allowed for work 
under private teachers outside of school. The number of pu- 
pils, though not much in excess of last year, includes a great- 
er diversity of musical activity, the voice and 8 instruments 
being comprehended. Instruction on piano is being taken by 
±7; violin by 18; voice by 5; drums and xylophone 2; clari- 
net, trumpet, cornet and alto horn, 1 each. 

The music teachers of Somerville are not organized in- 
to an association, such as exists in many other communities 
and while such associations have advocated and endorsed and 
cooperated with the system of credit for applied music real- 
izing that it furthers the cause of music, the talent of the 
pupils and the standards of the music teaching profession, 
feome of the Somerville teachers unfortunately have not looked 
\vith favor upon the movement, and have not encouraged their 
pupils to enroll for credit. If some means could be found of 
securing the united interest of the local private teachers the 
opportunity ottered by the school would be taken more ad- 
vantage of. 

There are 3So pupils enrolled for the one point of credit 
given for membership and satisfactory performance in the 
different musical organizations of the school which include 
orchestra, band, girls' fife, drum and bugle corps, boys' life 
and drum corps, mandolin club, senior-junior girls' glee club, 
sophomore girls' glee club and boys' glee club. These organ- 
izations take a prominent part in the functions of the school 
and in such other public atiairs as are authorized. They are 
an important tactor in the strengthening of the school spirit 
and the upbuilding of loyalty to the school and the commu- 
nity. The band and drum corps especially have an impor- 
tant part in the physical training program and in the outdoor 
activities of the school. The other organizations, by their na- 
ture, are associated more particularly with the indoor func- 
tions. 

The school orchestra numbers upwards of 60 players in- 
cluding, but not in the right proportion, all the instruments 
of the modern orchestra. Some thought has been given to the 
proposition of dividing the orchestral players into two groups, 
the first of which would be a balanced team of the most com- 
petent performers playing music suitable for any occasion 
where their presence might be desired, the second being a 
training group from which the most proficient players would 
be transferred to the first group as opportunity offered or 
need arose. 

The school band, numbering some 30 members, and the 
two drum corps, numbering about as many players in each, 



SCHOOL, DEPARTMENT. 339 

are composed of pupils able to play upon the necessary in- 
struments. A knowledge of music and an ability to perform 
is required of members of the band, as also of the orchestra 
ihe experience gained by pupils who are members of these 
organizations is chiefly in ensemble playing and an increased 
knowledge of musical literature. Instruction on fife or drum 
is given to such members of the drum corps as are in need of 
it, the pupils so instructed being added to those organizations 
as soon as their musical ability warrants. 

There are at present 47 girls, either playing or learning 
to play fife, drum, or bugle and 67 boys who can either play 
life or drum or are learning to play the fife. In addition 
there are 48 boys who have enrolled for instruction on the 
arum who have as yet received no attention owing to the 
i'act that the instructor of field music is employed for only 
i wo days a week, and that amount of time is more than filled 
by the amount of work now being carried on. 

The mandolin club, which has a membership of 24, is the 
newest of the musical activities, having been started for the 
first time in the Fall of 1921. 

Interest in singing among the girls has increased to such 
an extent recently that this year, as last, it was found ex- 
pedient to organize two glee clubs, one of senior and junior 
^irls and another of members of the sophomore class. The 
boys who sing, though less numerous, are fully as much inter- 
ested in that art as are the girls. Their organization numbers 
157 voices. 

The musical activities fostered by the school, besides pro- 
moting a greater general interest in music, have awakened 
in a considerable number of pupils a desire to give expres- 
sion to their musical sense and have in some individual in- 
stances promoted a proficiency in music which has brought 
not only pleasure but profit to its possessors. 

Interest in, and knowledge of, music, in one form or an- 
other, has never been as general as now, and while the musi- 
cal opportunities afforded at the Senior High School are not 
as broad or extensive as in some more fortunate communities, 
I hey have developed to such an extent as to justify their fur- 
ther extension. 

The further extension and development of musical op- 
portunities that might well be considered, and which have 
been found to give satisfactory results where introduced, in- 
clude the organization of instrumental units, such as bands 
;*iid drum corps, in the junior high schools, and the estab- 
lishing of classes in ear training, theory, perhaps harmony, 
and music appreciation, the giving of musical memory tests, 



340 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



and the providing of instruction on piano, violin, and other 
instruments either gratuitously or at a nominal cost in either 
the junior or senior high schools, 
paid in full to this office by I shall institute 



Accommodations 



In last year's report a detailed statement was made con* 
cerning school accommodations. No material change has oc- 
curred since then to modify the application of that statement 
to present conditions. A vacant room in the Proctor School 
has been occupied by an additional class but in other respects 
conditions are the same as last year at this time. While this 
statement is true now, very important action has been taken 
during the present municipal year which will soon change 
these conditions very materially. Upon recommendation of 
Mayor John M. Webster, the Board of Aldermen in April of 
tiiis year passed an order making provisions for a very im- 
portant addition to the school accommodations of the City 
of Sonierville. These provisions as a whole constitute the 
largest, the most comprehensive, and the most far-reaching 
building program ever recommended by a mayor and author- 
ised by a Board of Aldermen in a single year in the City 
of Somerville. It is responsive to the needs of the situation 
as they have been expressed by the School Committee in rec- 
ommendations made to the Mayor and Board of Aldermen. 

This building program consists of a new Junior High 
School building to be located on Marshall Street and of ad- 
ditions to the Western and Southern Junior High Schools. 
Work began on all of these projects in the early summer and 
has continued vigorously ever since. The corner stone of 
the new school on Marshall /Street was laid with due cere- 
mony on November 21, 1922. It is expected that this build- 
ing will be finished in November, 1923. It is expected that 
the additions to the Southern and Western Junior High 
schools will be finished early in 1923 so that the over-crowd- 
ing in both those places will then be relieved. When these two 
additions are completed the conditions at the Western and 
Southern Junior High Schools will be very greatly improved 
At the Western, an assembly room capable of seating about. 
1,000 pupils and convertible into an exercise room, and lock- 
ers and showers for boys and girls have been provided The 
new building on Marshall Street when completed will be 
a model in design and adaptation to use, and will be a source 
of pride to the city. When these improvements are all com- 
pleted, the junior high schools, which have so far been con- 
ducted under very adverse circumstances, will have an oppoi- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



341 



tunity to demonstrate plainly the efficiency which they have 
already attained, and will be able to add others which will 
be made possible by these improved accommodations. 

Teachers' Council 

One of the important developments in the field of school 
management in recent years is the Teachers' Council. As 
che relation of the Somerville teachers with the School Board 
has always been cordial and cooperative, the forming of a 
Teachers' Council was the natural thing to do when once it 
became clear that such an organization was worth while. Ac- 
cordingly, the School Board in June, 1921, authorized our 
teachers to establish and maintain a Teachers' Council. An 
account of this undertaking is given in the following state- 
ment which has been prepared at my request by George M. 
Hosmer, Chairman of the Teachers' Council. 



Report of the Chairman of the Somerville Teachers' Council 



Somerville, Massachusetts 
December 12, 1922. 

Mr. Charles S. Clark 
Superintendent of Schools 
Somerville, Massachusetts 



Dear Mr. Clark: 

The Teachers' Council is an outgrowth of the need for 
greater co-operation of the teachers with the School Board. 
Two years ago a tentative constitution was presented by a 
committee chosen by the School Board. This constitution was 
not accepted, and further action was postponed. 

In the fall of 1921 a committee was appointed of four 
representatives from each of the following groups : Kinder- 
garten, Primary and Elementary grades, Special and Voca- 
tional school teachers, Junior High, Senior High, American- 
ization and Continuation Schools, masters and masters*' as- 
sistants. 

From this representative group, five were appointed to 
revise the tentative constitution. ***** As revised by this 
committee the constitution was presented for approval by the 
various representatives to their respective groups. After 



342 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

their acceptance, the School Board approved the constitution 
kt the meeting in April, 1922. 

A ballot was made of twenty nominees, two chosen by 
each of ten groups. The election occurred May 10, 1922; and 
the Soinerville Teachers' Council was organized into an ac- 
tive body. 

The first meeting called to organize was held on June 
G, 1922. The following officers were elected by ballot: 

Chairman, George M. Hosrncr 
Vice-Chairrnan, Frank W. Seabury 
Secretary, Mary L. Bryant 
Treasurer, Mary H. Joyce 

It was voted to hold the meetings of the Council in the High 
School Library at i P. M., on the Monday preceding the last 
Monday of each month from September to June. The run- 
ning expenses of the Council are met by an annual assess- 
ment of ten cents from each Somerville teacher. 

At the first regular meeting held on September 18, as 
Superintendent, you accepted our invitation to be present, 
congratulating the Council on its organization, and asking 
its co-operation in dealing with the many educational prob- 
lems demanding solution. The Council pledged its loyal sup- 
port and readiness to help in all ways affecting the welfare 
of the schools. 

At the October meeting Miss Hazel ton gave a full ac- 
count of the origin of the curfew ordinance, and explained 
the difficulties in the way of its present enforcement. It 
was voted to promote the observance of American Education 
vVeek, December 3 to 9. The Council, therefore, at its Novem- 
ber meeting made definite plans for a constructive program 
to interest the public in the needs of our schools. The Som- 
erville Post of the American Legion co-operated with the 
Council and invited the chairman to address them, December 
7, on the need of Physical Education. A letter was sent to 
all the ministers of the city, urging them to preach upon the 
subject of Education, December 3. The local papers, at the 
request of the Council, gave good publicity to American Edu- 
cation Week. The different schools introduced special fea- 
tures, carrying out the purposes of the observance. 

At the November meeting of the School Board the Coun- 
cil offered some recommendations from a report of First 
Grade Teachers, concerning the admission of children to the 
first grade: 1. To admit into Grade 1, on or before the 

Monday following the opening of school, 
all children who are six, or who will be 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 343 

before December 31, and those only. 
2. To limit the number of pupils to a class 
in Grade 1 to forty; and the seating ca- 
pacity in each room to forty ; all desks and 
chairs in excess of that number to be re- 
moved, in order to allow more room for 
schoolroom activities. 

The Council desires to be of real service in the affairs 
of our schools, and hopes it may bring to bear upon the 
problems of the future the experience and judgment of the 
different groups which it represents. It also wishes to ac- 
knowledge your willing co-operation in every way, especial- 
ly in circulating with official bulletins a record of the Coun- 
cil's proceedings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(signed) George M. Hosmer, 

Chairman. 



Professional Improvement of Teachers 

The professional improvement of teachers in service is 
one of the most important influences -affecting the charac- 
ter of school instruction. It is the element which, added to 
professional training before entering the service, determines 
the character of a teacher's work. Last year an inquiry 
taken at this time showed that a large number of our teach- 
ers were engaged during the school year on some kind of pro- 
fessional study. This condition is repeated again this year 
as shown by recent reports. More than 190 are engaged in 
some form of educational study. Such continued interest 
by our teachers in efforts for self-improvement cannot fail 
to be beneficial to our schools. Inasmuch as this is all done 
without expectation of material reward greater credit is due 
them. 



Cooperating Agencies 

During the year the work of the schools has been helped 
by cooperation of a number of interested agencies. First of 
all among these should be mentioned the work which teach- 
ers have done outside of their classroom teaching. In com- 
mittees and as individuals working with the Superintend- 
ent they have furnished substantial help in the selection of 
text-books, in the improvement of courses of study, and in 
the study of problems of educational procedure. This work 



344 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



is still going on in respect to some very important problems 
of school organization and procedure. 

A substantial gift of money was one of the outstanding 
contributions from outside sources. In June 1922 a group 
known as the "Women of Somerville" gave the School Com- 
mittee $429.59 to be expended in improvements of the Den- 
tal Dispensary. From this gift it has been possible to pro- 
vide a new chair and motor. 

Impetus to the study of history has been given through 
offers of medals and money for prize essays on historical 
subjects. The organizations which offered such prizes were: 
Major John A. Cummings. Camp 3, Sons of Veterans; Ameri- 
can Legion, Post Xo. 19; Anne Adams Tufts Chapter, D. A. 
K. The Women's Christian Temperance Union offered prizes 
for compositions upon the "evil effects of alcohol and tobac- 
co." 



Summary 

This review has dealt briefly with many things which 
are being done in our schools but more have been passed 
over without comment lest this report exceed proper limits. 
The selection, however, has been made for the purpose of 
showing the larger parts of the undertaking and what each 
is doing. The dominant note of the whole story is the high- 
est development of the individual, both for his own sake and 
lor the sake of the social order of which he is a part. This 
note is dominant today more than at any other time in the 
history of public education in this country. The right of 
every child to have a chance for making the most of him- 
self is conceded. It is a proud boast that the public schools 
are for "all the children of all the people." It is recognized 
that children differ from one another in interests, aptitudes, 
and abilities. It is no longer attempted to conduct schools 
as though pupils were all alike. The child is the center of 
interest in whose behalf books, studies, equipment, and all 
other agencies of education are used to the end that he may 
attain his highest possible destiny. As children differ from 
one another so must agencies used and opportunities offered 
differ. As children are alike so must agencies used and op- 
portunities offered be common to all. Account has been giv- 
en in this report of the different opportunities which are now 
provided for our children. These are in the main different 
types of schools or courses of study. They are provided and 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 345 

maintained to meet the most outstanding differences in the 
needs of children. Much more can and should be done in 
this direction when means permit. As the dominant note 
dictates these provisions for the development of the individ- 
ual as such, so it compels the use of these provisions for the 
social welfare of the individual and of the society of which 
he is now a ward, but of which he will soon be an active par- 
ticipant to contribute his share in determining its nature 
and destiny. What the children in the public schools be- 
come, so will society be. Manifestly the schools must train 
the pupils in qualities which will make them capable of main- 
taining the institutions of a democracy. The schools must 
consciously visualize these qualities and consciously and con- 
stantly strive to develop them in all pupils. The means for 
doing this is instruction. Instruction is the function of 
teachers. In all types of schools or courses, in all grades of 
all schools, instruction is the means and teachers instruct. 
It is then through instruction from teachers that the pupil 
must be made fit for the duties which he must assume as a 
member of society, an equal of every other member under 
the law. As demand for this social training is more insis- 
tent now than ever before, so now, more than ever before, 
the school must find ways and means for performing this 
service. As this can only be done through instruction, the 
materials of instruction must be consciously and constantly 
used to this end. The statements which have been made by 
my associates and included in this report all bear testimony 
to the fact that the work of our schools is consciously motiva- 
ted by these ideals and that the work is being vigorously 
and successfully carried on. 



Conclusion 

I want to acknowledge again the courtesy and consider- 
ation shown to me by all members of the School Committee 
and to express my appreciation of the loyalty and coopera- 
tive spirit of our teachers and principals. These have been 
the means of a year of success and progress. The end crowns 
the work. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Charles S. Clark, 
Superintendent of Schools. 



346 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF THE 
PRINCIPAL OF THE VOCATIONAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS 

Mr. Charles S. Clark 
Superintendent of Schools 
Somerville, Mass. 

Dear Sir: 

I submit the following report for the Department of 
Manual Arts anrl for the Vocational Work for the year 1922. 

The free-hand drawing of the six grades continues as in 
past years with instruction by the room teachers under the 
direct supervision of Miss Gale. This method is the most 
satisfactory one yet devised and is in vogue throughout the 
country. 

The free-hand drawing in the Junior High Schools is now 
in charge of a special teacher in each school as in the Senior 
High School. There is great need of special and additional 
equipment for the free-hand drawing work in the Junior High 
Schools, as these schools now seem to be able to accomplish 
more intensive work than was formerly attained by pupils 
from the 7th, 8th and 9th grades. 

The drawing of the boys of the Junior High Schools 
covers more ground than heretofore and is more closely re- 
lated to the hand work. A special room would be of great 
advantage and would enable us to achieve better results in 
this work. 

The shops of the Junior High Schools need to be more 
fully equipped in order to provide adequate facilities for the 
work. Educators are still debating the question as to the 
advisability of providing a varied number of activities for 
Junior High Schools. However, our present activities are of 
a basic nature and therefore are the most important ones 
for any school to have. In my opinion, if one or two activ- 
ities are provided, these should be fully and adequately equip- 
ped in order to obtain good results. 

The Rehabilitation of the Ex-Service men, which was 
maintained for three years, has been discontinued and the 
Boys' Vocational School is now devoting its whole effort to 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



347 



the training of boys in Wood Work, Machine and Auto Me- 
chanics. 

The school has been unable to accept all applicants be- 
cause of lack of room. If the school were enlarged to pro- 
vide instruction in other trades such as Printing, Electrical 
Work, and possibly sheet metal and laboratory work in con- 
nection with the auto department, much more could be ac- 
complished in trade lines. 

The State Report on Productivity for the past year pre- 
sents the following audited report : 



Value of all products . . . $5,834 79 

Cash received and turned back to City 

and School 1,568 83 

Value of products for School and City 

Departments . . .... 1,374 35 

Value of products increasing value of 

school plant 1,549 01 

Value of material furnished by custom- 
ers . 1,172 45 



Financial Statement, 1921-1922 



Gross maintenance 


$27,265 87 


Income from 




Smith-Hughes Fund 


1,699 46 


Non-resident tuition 


3,576 16 


Veterans' Bureau . ». 


9,885 58 


Cash from products 


2,219 24 


Credits .... 




Total . . .... 


. '*.. 17,380 44 


Net maintenance cost 


9,885 43 


Net cost per capita . 


9 


State Reimbursement 


4,942 72 



Net cost to City 4,942 71 

Net cost per capita to City 

Labor and value of products on work 

for School and City Departments for 

which no charge was made . . . 930 67 

Net Cost to City . . . . . 4,012 04 

Net Cost per Capita to City . 



$83,213 



41.61 



33.77 



Respectfully submitted, 

Harry L. Jones. 



January, 1323. 



348 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE CONTINUATION SCHOOLS 
AND AMERICANIZATION WORK 

January 1, 1923. 

Mr. Charles S. Clark 

Superintendent of Schools 
Soruerville, Massachusetts 

Dear Mr. Clark: 

I herewith submit a report of the Continuation Schools 
and Americanization classes for the year 1922. 

Continuation Schools 

The Continuation Schools, opened in September 1920, 
have completed their second full year and have begun the 
third with the same organization, equipment and accommo- 
dations with which they started. In small schools like ours, 
which are organized in two general departments, academic 
and practical, it is a considerable problem to offer a desir- 
able variety of practical activities for the students. In Sep- 
tember 1920 the schools offered Household Arts for the girls 
and Woodworking for the boys. During the past year an in- 
tensive course of twelve lessons in Home Nursing was given 
for all the girls. Arrangements were made with the Som- 
erville Hospital for the use of the instruction room of that 
institution and the lessons were given by the instructor of 
Training Nurses. 

Some new equipment has been purchased and soon the 
activities for the boys will include sheet metal work and 
electric wiring. Xo increase in the cost of instruction, how- 
ever, will accrue for the woodworking instructor will carry 
on this proposed new work. 

In woodworking new and more advanced projects have 
been added to the already large list, without in the least 
reducing the high standard of workmanship. By this and 
other means interest and attendance of the youth is held 
in the various departments. 

Our productivity returns to the State Department of 
Education for the year to June 1922 show a market value 
of products made in the school of $745.34. Material accom- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 349 

plishment, however, does not show the whole or real value of 
the school. That is shown by the inspiration and strength 
given most of the students to see and follow the path of 
duty as it conies to them in future years. Pupils are guided 
to positions of better remuneration and opportunity ^when- 
ever possible, thirteen having been thus aided during the 
year. An attempt is made to teach them how and why to 
conduct themselves that they may become better citizens of 
our city, state and country. We realize that these youths 
will, some in five and some in seven years, be voters and di- 
rectors of the policies and actions of this great country of 
ours. Is it any wonder then, that we are vitallv interested 
in these fourteen to sixteen year old minors, and do what we 
can to show them the path toward a better and more success- 
ful citizenship ? Various cases might be cited to show that 
the teachers, who teach boys and girls rather than subjects, 
and guide the progress of the employed adolescent youth, are 
getting at least within sight of the road toward success. 

It is important that the students realize that, although 
they have left the regular schools, their education is not 
complete, and that they must cultivate the habit of learning 
and earning at the same time. To accomplish our aims we 
must do more than simply teach a subject in a classroom, 
and we solicit and (with few exceptions) receive the hearty 
cooperation of parents and employers through the medium 
of follow-up visits to the homes and places of employment. 
The teacher, sympathetic and desirous of helping the stu- 
dent, becomes a friend and advisor with the result that at- 
tendance is improved, interest increased, and discipline made 
easier. The employer sees that the school can be an asset to 
him inasmuch as it provides that which will make the work- 
er a more industrious and competent citizen. 

The country-wide depression in business, which followed 
the apparent closing of the World War has made itself felt 
to a considerable degree in the matter of enrollment in these 
schools. Minors under sixteen must remain in the regular 
schools unless they are fourteen, have completed the sixth 
grade and have a written promise of employment. The scarci- 
ty of jobs makes it impossible for many of the under-six- 
teen group to leave the regular schools and fill the places in 
the Continuation Schools vacated by those who become six- 
teen and automatically leave our jurisdiction. The number 
of eligible students, therefore, steadily decreased, reaching 
its low limit about September 1922. Since that time, how- 
ever, the employed groups have been very slowly increasing 
in size, but it has been found that employers are refusing 



350 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



to employ minors under sixteen because they can now find mi- 
nors over sixteen who are permitted by law to work nine 
hours a day, and who will work for the same wages as would 
be paid to those under sixteen. As business improves, the 
over- sixteen group will fina better opportunities, thus leaving 
jobs open for those now in the regular schools, which will tend 
to normalize the enrolment in the Continuation Schools. The 
enrolment will undoubtedly be substantially increased in case 
legislation, now pending, concerning the compulsory school 
and Continuation School ages, and an amendment to the Con- 
tinuation School tuition bill, is passed. 

The following tabular statement of the educational ac- 
complishment of the fourteen to sixteen year old residents 
in Somerville, employed here or elsewhere, will, without 
doubt, sho\s the need tor s longer compulsory school attend- 
ance period for the youth who will in from rive to seven years 
be called on as intelligent citizens to consider the problems 
of this democracy. 



Table Showing Distribution of 14-16 Year Old Holders of 
Employment Certificates by Grade 
Completed in Regular Schools 

Grade Below 

Completed 4 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total 

Girls 2 Z 12 39 69 55 28 6 4 267 

Boys 6 4 26 128 90 32 46 10 2 394 

Total 8 6 38 217 159 137 74 16 6 661 



39.3% 
41.7% 
40.7% 

60.7% 

58.3% 
59.3% 

33.3% 

32.5% 

25.8% 
22.8% 



Some Pertinent Facts Shown by the Table: 

Complete Grade VI or less 



of the employed girls 
of the employed boys 
of both 



of the employed girls 
of the employed boys 
of both 

of all employed girls 
of all employed boys 

of all employed girls 
of all employed boys 



Complete Grade VII or better 

Complete Grade VI 
Complete Grade VII 



Americanization 



Four years after the Legislature of Massachusetts dis- 
covered the need for teaching the English language to adult 
foreigners, the term "Americanization" is still rather elastic 
and has been stretched to cover all sorts of movements and 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 351 

activities. It stilJ means, however, making good American 
citizens of both native and foreign-born. Tt also means ser- 
vice, equal opportunity and the awakening of loyalty of the 
foreign-born. 

Desirous of leading normal lives, they must overcome 
certain obstacles, the greatest of which are ignorance of our 
language and ignorance of our laws. 

Many people still consider the work of Americanization 
a war activity, since such an enormous problem of illiteracy 
was brought to light by the operation of the draft legisla- 
tion. Such is not the case, for our State for thirty years 
has compelled the attendance of illiterate minors in Evening 
Schools for the purpose of learning English, and voluntary 
classes for illiterate adults have been carried on for over 
twenty years. 

Our city and state are jointly providing means to over- 
come the obstacles confronting the foreign-born, who readily 
grasp the opportunity and appreciate the value of the under- 
taking to themselves as well as to our country. 

As evidence of this joint undertaking on the part of the 
city and state may be cited the twenty-three classes we are 
now conducting. The .membership of 356 includes Italians, 
Greeks, Swedes, Danes, Portuguese, Germans, Hebrews, Poles, 
Armenians, Chinese, and others. The ages of the attendants 
on these classes range from sixteen to sixty years, and the 
periods of residence in this country vary at date of enrol- 
ment from two days to thirty years. Some are well educated 
in their native tongue while a large majority are illiterate in 
any language. The locations and numbers of the various 
racial groups have not changed to any material degree dur- 
ing the year. 

The organization, as last year, consists of a Directoi, 
two fall-time organizers (who also supervise and teach) and 
twelve teachers. The supervisors, who rank very high among 
the teachers of the State, have done excellent woik in or- 
ganization and instruction. In addition to the time spent 
in teaching and supervisory work in their respective districts, 
many hours during mornings and between classes are used 
in making visitations to the students in their homes, for the 
purpose of following up absentees and assisting in solving 
household and other problems. Confidential problems of all 
kinds, and entanglements of various sorts concerning Natural- 
ization papers, insurance, money exchange, et cetera are 
solved by them. An exceptional personality is a necessary 
requisite in obtaining such excellent results and attaining 



352 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



the respect, appreciation and affection of the non-English 
speaking people. 

Each year, the Anne Adams Tufts Chapter, D. A. It. of- 
fers a $50 scholarship to the International College at Spring- 
field for a deserving, reliable, and ambitious student of our 
classes. The ladies of this organization have been greatly 
interested and have assisted materially in our work. Through 
their efforts, girls in the Social Service Course of Jackson 
College have given freely of their services in caring for the 
children who must accompany the mothers to the afternoon 
classes. Other cities find it necessary to hire persons for the 
care of such children. 

The appended table shows the scope of Americanization 
work in operation when the schools were closed for the Christ- 
mas recess. 

The results of the work in Americanization and the Con- 
tinuation Schools during the year have been gratifying to 
me and I wish to express my appreciation to all who have 
shown interest and have aided in making the work success- 
ful. 



Very truly yours, 
Everett W. Ireland, 

Director. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



353 



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354 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL OF THE EVENING HIGH SCHOOL 

Mr. Charles S. Clark 
Superintendent of Schools 
Somerville, Massachusetts 

Dear Mr. Clark: 

The Evening High School has registered seven hundred 
and sixteen pupils during the fall term of 1922. They vary 
in age from fourteen to fifty-eight years, the average" being 
twenty years. They range in previous school training from 
non-graduates of elementary schools to graduates of colleges. 
They may be grouped as follows: 



From elementary schools 
From junior high schools 
From senior high schools 
From colleges 



212 

138 

347 

19 

716 



Attendance in the school is voluntary. All subjects, in- 
cluding English, are elective. The following table gives the 
number of pupils electing each subject: 



Typewriting 


. 259 


Shorthand 


. 230 


Business English . . . 


. 115 


General Course 


110 


Salesmanship 


. 84 


Bookkeeping 


69 


Mechanical Drawing 


51 


Algebra 


37 


Freehand Drawing and Arts and Crafts . 


34 


Geometry . . 


32 


Chemistry 


28 



A brief outline of the courses offered is given below. 
Shorthand and Typewriting. Pupils are graded into begin- 
ning, intermediate, advanced and speed classes. Necessary 
instruction is given in English grammar, spelling, and punctu- 
ation. The speed classes, composed largely of professional 
stenographers, aim for the highest degree of business effici- 
ency. 

Business English. This course provides opportunity for a 
study of spoken and written English as needed in business 
communications, in advertising and in salesmanship. It cor- 
relates closely with the stenography and the salesmanship 
courses. 
General Course. English, arithmetic, and penmanship are 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 355 

the principal subjects. In addition, each pupil has a choice 
of civics, United States history, or debating. Preparation 
is given in this course for civil service examinations. The 
classes include many persons of mature age who see the need 
for review or further study of the fundamentals of education. 
Salesmanship. A study of the general principles and ethics 
of selling goods. Class discussions and practice sales tend 
to develop self-confidence. Talks by practical salesmen and 
the free use of books and magazine articles on commercial 
subjects are features of the course. 

Bookkeeping. Arithmetic and penmanship are studied with 
the bookkeeping. Pupils are fitted for office positions and 
clerical work and prepared for the further study of accoun- 
tancy in other institutions. 

Mechanical Drawing. The beginning class is taught the use 
of instruments, geometry, projection, inking and blue print- 
ing. In the advanced class instruction is given in machine 
and architectural drawing and in special work as desired 
by pupils. 

Freehand Drawing. This subject includes work in fine and 
practical arts. Individual instruction is given in designing 
for fabrics, costumes, posters, and wall papers and in craft 
work in metal, leather, and basketry. 

Chemistry. This is a practical course for prospective drug- 
gists and nurses and for persons interested in industries 
such as the manufacture of soap, rubber goods, drugs and 
paper. It teaches the composition of substances, their com- 
binations and reactions. 

A questionnaire recently submitted to the pupils required an- 
swers to the following two questions : 

I. What benefit, financial or otherwise, do you expect 
to obtain from attending the Somerville Evening High 
School? 

II. If your attendance here has already been of value 
to you, state in what way. 

A summary of replies received may be of inteiest. 

First question, benefits expected 
Better positions. Factory and bundle girls wish to become 
ehjrks and typists. Sales and filing clerks want general office 
or shorthand positions. One boy writes, "I am an office 
boy and was offered a higher position if I learned bookkeep- 
ing." 

Advancement in present positions. Pupils hope to increase 
their economic efficiency through a more confident use of Eng- 
lish, through greater speed and accuracy m mathematics and 
through a better knowledge of the theory and underlying prin- 
ciples of their work. 



356 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Improvement in general education. One writes, "1 know that 
any knowledge will help me wherever I may be/' Another 
writes, "I expect broadening of mind/' 

Assistance in preparation for higher institutions, as Tiffs 
College, Northeastern College, Lowell Institute. 
Preparation for Civil Service Examinations, federal, state. 
and municipal. 



Second question, benefits already obtained 

Advancement and new positions. One young woman states 
that she secured her present position at the State House 
through her training at the Somerville Evening High School. 
Wage increases and more desirable employment are mentioned 
by others. 

Increased working ability. Pupils write of making daily use 
of their evening school training in their occupations. The} 
claim a better understanding of their duties. One writes, 
'"I have been taught to take an interest in my work." 
General Education extended. U I have proved to myself that 
I can get an education and training for business at the same 
time." "It (the school) has given me a higher standing 
among people." "I have learned to talk when I have an idea 
so that I can be easily understood." "I think my attendance 
here is time well spent ; it brightens up my English and my 
pronunciation." A desire for knowledge has been developed. 
One class has studied the history and civil government of 
Somerville and shown great interest in these subjects. 

Graduation and Diplomas 

The commercial value of a diploma is recognized by the 
pupils. There is also a sentimental value which appeals par- 
ticularly to those who were obliged to leave the day high 
school before graduation. Members of the evening school 
senior class find pleasure and social profit in their class 
activities. About sixty pupils will graduate in March, 1923. 

Membership and Attendance 

Many who register drop from membership after a few 
days or weeks. The reasons so far as they are known include 
late working hours, fatigue, ill health, and the pressure of 
social engagements. Doubtless, also there is the faint heart, 
the lack of determination to follow the undertaking through. 
On the other hand, it is encouraging to note that of seven 
hundred and sixteen registrants about four hundred and fifty 
earnest pupils are now enrolled and. if we may believe the 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 357 

evidence of the questionnaire, are making substantial prog- 
ress in their work. 

The Teachers 

Many factors contribute to the making of the successful 
evening school teacher. There should be the professional 
training of the day school teacher. There should be also the 
personality, the tact, the interest in the individual pupil suf- 
ficient to insure his continued voluntary attendance. On the 
teachers rests in a large degree the responsibility for main- 
taining the membership and interest of their respective 
groups of pupils, and to them should be given the credit for 
success. The principal desires here to record his apprecia- 
tion of the good results due to the ability, experience, and 
faithful service of the teachers in the Evening High School. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Everett W. Tuttle, 

Principal. 
January, 1923. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF HOUSEHOLD ARTS 

Mr. Charles S. Clark 
Superintendent of Schools 
Somerville, Mass. 

Dear Sir : 

Following is a summary of the development of House- 
hold Arts instruction, showing its growth since it was in- 
augurated ten years ago. 

Household Arts in the High School 

THE 50-50 PLAN OF ORGANIZATION AUTHORIZED 

by the 
STATE BOARD FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

This course offers sufficient variety of subject matter to 
make a wide choice. The number electing this course has 
grown steadily since it was established three years ago ; 
twice as many enrolled this year as last, and with definite 
ideas as to what training to select after graduation. 



358 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The course of study is so planned that half of the school 
day is given to the regular subjects required each year in 
the general high school course, and the other half to house- 
hold arts and the related studies. The major subjects are 
cooking, household management, nursing, dressmaking, and 
millinery. 

^ A part of this household arts education is the close corre- 
lation made between the school and the home in the form 
of projects. These projects are planned after visits to the 
homes, and conferences with the mothers as to what each 
girl needs to gain initiative and responsibility in caring for 
her home. Most of the problems are definitely related to the 
individual. In one case the mother works in town and the 
daughter does all the housework and cooking, so projects 
of planning meals, buying supplies, and the care of the house, 
were given this girl for a certain time until a satisfactory 
report should be made by the mother. In another case the 
mother is an invalid and much of the care falls upon the 
daughter, so projects in the care of a sick person are given 
as well as projects in the preparation of meals. When inter- 
est in mending needs to. be encouraged projects are given Li 
that for a limited time. In all cases reports are made by 
the mother to the director by means of report cards and home 
visits. 

This project work covers approximately 200 hours a year, 
and as there are no home studies it is the equivalent of the 
time used by students in other courses for home study, and is 
credited to each girl, who must complete each year 1400 hours 
of school and project time. Until a visit is made to the 
home, there are certain projects that are general for all girls. 
They include the preparation of foods, the care of household 
linens, the repair of clothing, the care of house equipment, the 
making of dresses or hats for some member of the family, 
the making of underwear, personal expense accounts, and pre- 
serving. 

Through the interest of a member of the School Com- 
mittee arrangements were made last year with the trustees 
of the Somcrville Hospital to hold classes in home nursing 
at the hospital. These classes were held once a week for 
three months, the nurse in charge of the training class there 
giving the lessons to the different school groups. The les- 
sons were oi the most practical kind, dealing with the care 
of the patient in the home, and covering the twelve parts 
of the modified Red Cross course; the cause and prevention 
ol disease, personal hygiene, equipment of a sick room, care 
of bed and bedding, bed-making with and without the patient, 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 359 

baths of different kinds, utensils and methods used in a sick 
room, hot and cold appliances, child care, emergencies, and 
first aid. In three cases where there was illness the lessons 
were put to immediate use at home. Great enthusiasm was 
shown by all the girls for this course, and by some of their 
mothers as well, who were interested enough to send in ques- 
tions, and one even volunteered to take her babv for the 
demonstration of bathing the baby. 

New courses have been added this year for the senior 
class, one in the study of occupations open to the high school 
graduate. This is a short course covering half a year and 
deals with the types of employment, the preparation, skill, 
and knowledge needed by each, and the qualifications neces- 
sary for each type. The questions of unemployment, seasonal 
occupations, and "blind alley jobs" are also studied. We feel 
this to be an important study for pupils who are to earn 
their living and who take ignorantly anything that offers 
without knowing what the demands of a position are or 
whether they are fitted for it especially. 

Another half-year course is the study and care of cloth- 
ing. This covers the following points : the making of per- 
sonal expense accounts, personal clothing budgets, study of 
textile fabrics from the standpoint of the individual ward- 
robe in renovating garments, how to purchase clothing, reno- 
vating and remodelling clothing, and care and repair of 
clothing. The making of a clothing budget is the basis for 
this study. 

Closely i elated to this is the course in household ac- 
counts which deals with the family budget and the plan- 
ning and furnishing of a home, with emphasis on the costs 
and the appropriate selection of furniture and furnishings. 
The girls have little or no knowledge of the family finances, 
so a teaching base is made from data collected of the actual 
experiences of families in the seven problems that are stud- 
ied. 

These problems are: 

The school girl's account book which is kept daily 
by each pupil. 

A personal account kept by those giris who are earn- 
ing money outside of school hours, and a simple budget plan- 
ned on these experiences. 

A budget of time for girls working at home after 
school hours. 

A budget of household expenses for the girl in charge 
of the home. 

The problem of the young couple who before mar- 
riage are working and who are keeping an individual expense 



360 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

account in order to save a certain amount to begin house- 
keeping. 

Problem of wh r i can be bought with these savings. 
Problem of housekeeping budget after marriage. 

Giaduates from the Household Arts Course have various 
opportunities for employment and an idea of what higher 
institutions offer in the way of advanced training. The class- 
es are small and one learns to know the girls intimately so 
that it is possible to advise and suggest what is the best 
course to follow after graduation. Catalogues of different 
training schools are studied. Some schools recognize the 
Household Arts Course in a high school and give credit for 
time spent on this vocational work. 

There are innumerable positions for the graduates as 
dressmakers' assistants. There are opportunities for girls 
working into business for themselves; also by keeping the 
trade contact, and with professional improvement, taking po- 
sitions as inrtructors of vocational subjects in evening schools, 
where there are more positions offered than applicants to 
fill them. 

Although miliinery is seasonal, opportunities are many in 
first class shops if a girl is willing to begin at the bottom 
aod work to gain speed. 

Tea rooms oifei positions as waitresses, where hours are 
short, pay excellent, and the conditions good; but except 
for a few there is no advancement. They offer excellent train- 
ing for girls who wish to open their own tea rooms, where 
there is liUie expense but much profit. 

The study and preparation of foods helps in positions re- 
sulting from hospital training and public health nursing, 
t'ramingham is also offering a special course for training 
teachers for vocational subjects. 

Household Arts as an Elective in the High School 

The number selecting dressmaking this year is about the 
Fame as last y^ar — L70. One important change has been 
made by the elimination of cotton dresses from the Sopho- 
more year, and the substitution of the making of woolen 
dresses, except in cases where pupils have not had two years 
of dressmaking in the junior high schools. This means that 
advanced work can be doue, and the waste of repetition re- 
moved as far as possible. 

Last year the approximate cost of all material used in 
the elective course was $1805.12 and the estimated market 
value of the garments $3895.00. Following is a list of the 
garments made; 96 voile and organdy dresses including 40 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 361 

graduation dresses; 98 gingham dresses; 46 serge dresses; 
Si silk dresses ; 29 separate skirts, wool and satin ; 3 polo 
coats, 24 separate blouses, including voile and satin; 10 coat 
suits including 3 linen and 1 velvet ; 3 velvet dresses. 

Sixty have elected cooking this year. The class work 
is planned as last year, the pupils preparing the food served 
at lunch time to the teachers. 

Household Arts in the Junior High Schools 

Sewing is taught in the first year, continuing progres- 
sively from the graded schools, and in the second and third 
years cotton dresses are made. If dressmaking is elected the 
third year, woolen dresses are made when entering the High 
School, otherwise a cotton dress must be completed first. 

Each junior high school had a most creditable fashion 
show last year when the pupils exhibited the dresses they had 
made by wearing them to a meeting of the Parents' Associa- 
tion. 

Preparing a lunch for the teachers supplies a practical 
outlet for lessons in cooking. The food is prepared and 
cooked by the different classes, served to teachers, and when 
conditions permit, to pupils. While it is felt that this meal 
preparation is the best way to teach cooking because it is of 
immediate benefit to girls who are obliged to prepare meals 
at home without any assistance, it has its disadvantages when 
first and third year pupils are in the same class, and where 
advanced pupils who ought to have the experience of pre- 
paring lunch, are sometimes obliged to have lessons after 
lunch when there is nothing but the cleaning to be done. 

At the Western Junior High School a lunch room was 
opened two years ago for the pupils, in charge of a compe- 
tent woman, where hot food at a low price could be pur- 
chased. The extra food prepared by the regular cooking 
classes is also served here, and it is hoped that when the 
new lunch room is properly equipped for cooking, a greater 
variety of foods can be served, and a greater number accom- 
modated. 

Household Arts in the Graded Schools 

The teachers remain the same for the sewing classes, ex- 
cept for one part-time teacher who takes the place of a 
teacher regularly appointed to another position. 

The course of study has not been changed, but again 
emphasis has been placed on the proper implements to use 
in sewing, and the correct position for sewing and for light, 



362 ANNUAL RBPORTS. 

rather than the completion of a definite number of articles. 
The required articles made in the 5th grade are a sewing 
bag, needle book, and pincushion, with an optional list which 
the teachers may use at their discretion. 

In the 6th grade a cooking apron, uniform in style for 
all schools, is made, the material and ornamentation varying 
to suit individual preferences. Other sewing is optional when 
this has been completed. The aprons are used through the 
junior high schools where caps are made in the special style 
adopted by that school. The course of sewing develops 
through grades, junior high school, and senior high school, 
and covers the best processes of sewing accepted by the best 
training schools. 

Household Arts in Evening Schools 

The registration for dressmaking and millinery classes 
this year exceeded the accommodations or the number of 
available teachers. Those registering at the High School 
numbered 130 when 100 could be accommodated; those at 
the Western Junior High School 71 with an accommodation 
for 60. Waiting lists were formed at both schools, and the 
classes were filled in from these as pupils dropped out. 

The classes are organized on the "unit" system, each unit 
of twenty lessons being complete in itself, and yet so ar- 
ranged that the complete instruction in either dressmaking 
or millinery covers two years. These short units have been 
arranged because evening school attendance through the 
whole winter has not always been possible with the home- 
maker who is often absent because of illness, church, and so- 
cial engagements. This lack of attendance because of outside 
interests is the biggest problem of evening schools, for when 
a social engagement conflicts with school, the school suffers, 
and it is difficult to keep the attendance above 85%. Last 
year the attendance for the eight classes was 81.3%. 

Even with this irregularity of attendance there has al- 
ways been the greatest interest shown by those in the eve- 
ning classes, and appreciation of all that the teachers have 
given in the way of instruction. The standard of workman- 
ship is as high as any in the State-aided evening schools. 
Last year 350 hats were finished at a cost of $1508.08 and a 
market valuation of |5789.50. 

There were three dressmaking classes where 94 dresses 
were made at a cost of $532.88 and a valuation of $1751.75. 
Besides these there were a number of dresses and hats not 
brought in for examination, the pupils dropping out of the 
course as soon as they had completed one article. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 363 

For the most part the working conditions are good. The 
rooms are large and well lighted, and tables take the place 
of school desks. 

This year the first unit offered was the making of a wool- 
en dress instead of a cotton one, as cotton dresses are so 
simply made with a good pattern and instruction guide, and 
it was felt that the interest would be held better by offering 
instruction on woolen materials. The second unit offers in- 
struction in sport clothes, and the third and fourth units 
remain the same as last year. 

In the first unit of millinery, construction and proc- 
esses of making were considered in making small model hats 
of buckram. We tried to have the essential thing the mil- 
linery principles that could be applied to all kinds of hats, 
rather than the making of many hats. In all classes a regu- 
lar order of progressive steps has been carried on; the selec- 
tion of hats to suit the individual, the construction of a 
frame, the stitches used for different parts, the making of 
ornaments and flowers, and the completion of two hats for 
application. 



High School Lunch Room 

In the management of the lunch room the aim has always 
been to have wholesome food prepared in our own kitchens 
and sold at a reasonable price. This year it was found pos- 
sible to lower the selling price in spite of the fact that all 
overhead expenses except for gas and electricity are covered 
in the selling price of food. These include the salaries paid 
manager, helpers and pupils, new equipment necessary each 
year, and the maintenance cost of paper towels and napkins, 
lunch checks, and kitchen supplies. 

The menu offers a variety each day. There are served 
three kinds of sandwiches, two to three hot dishes, two des- 
serts, besides ice cream, individual bottles of milk, and choco- 
late bars. 

There is no way of estimating the number of pupils ser- 
ved a day ; but an average would be between 700 and 800 with 
considerably more on stormy days. As we have an open re- 
cess it is encouraging to see how many use the lunch room. 

In the teachers' lunch room sixty are served a day in 
two periods. The food is prepared in the morning preceding 
the lunch period by the pupils electing this course. 

For the year closing last June the receipts were $7725.70 
for the two lunch rooms, and the expenses $7723.11. 

It is hoped that before another year the large lunch room 



364 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



can be made more attractive by having the walls whitened, 
and the dangers resulting from a wet concrete floor elimi- 
nated. . 

In submitting my report I should like to add that the 
activities in all these departments are being carried out suc- 
cessfully, owing to the interest of the pupils and the ready 
cooperation of the teachers. 

Very truly yours, 

Mary Henleigh Brown, 

Director. 
December, 1922. 



Statement Showing Distribution of High School Pupils by Subjects 



DEGEMIBEfRj 1922 



Subject 

English . 

Elocution 

History . 

Latin 

French . 

German 

Spanish 

Greek 

Algebra 

Geometry 

Trigonometry 

Chemistry 

Physics . 

Astronomy and Geology 

Biology 

Physiology 

Bookkeeping 

Stenography 

Typewriting 

Penmanship 

Commerce and Industry 

Salesmanship 

Arithmetic 

Commercial Law . 

Manual Training . 

Mechanical Drawing 

Freehand Drawing 

Cooking 

Sewing 

Arts and Crafts 

Household Arts 



Total 

1961 

718 

1245 

383 

828 

29 
412 

23 

429 

1261 

42 
336 
274 

33 

84 
393 
372 
643 
652 
770 
339 
171 
149 
106 
176 
324 
155 

65 
169 

26 

65 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



365 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Number of Graduates Entering Higher Institutions. 

September, 1922 



Bates College 1 

Boston College 6 

Boston University- 
Business Administration .... 4 

Liberal Arts 3 

Secretarial Science 9 

Law 2 

Dartmouth College 4 

Emerson College 2 

Harvard University 6 

Jackson College 6 

Lasell Seminary 1 

Lowell Textile School 2 

Mass. Agricultural College 2 

Mass. Institute of Technology.... 10 

Mt. Holyoke College 1 

N. H. State College 1 



Normal Schools 

Bridgewater 4 

Framingham 2 

Lowell 1 

Normal Art 9 

Salem 9 

Northeastern College 6 

Radcliffe College 7 

Simmons College 7 

Smith College 2 

Tufts 

College 17 

Pre-Medical ..... 4 

Pre-Dental 2 

Wheaton College 2 

Total 132 



"FOLLOW-UP" INFORMATION REGARDING 
GRADUATES OF CLASS OF 1921 

(Compiled March 1922) 
BY COURSES 



Continuing at College 

Amherst College . 

Boston College 

Boston University 

Dartmouth College 

Emerson College of Oratory 

Harvard College . 

Holy Angels College . 

Jackson College . 

Mass. Inst, of Technology . 

New Hampshire State College 

Northeastern College . 

Radcliffe .... 

Rhode Island State College 

St. Charles College . 

St. Francis Xavier College 

Simmons College . 

Tufts College 

Tufts Pre-Medical School . 

University of Vermont 

Wheaton College . 



Com- Col- Nor- Gen- Scien- 
mercial lege mal eral 



4 
9 
2 

2 
10 

1 



Continuing at Special Schools 
Gordon College .... l 

Mass. School of Osteopathy 
Mass. College of Pharmacy . 2 

N. E. Conservatory of Music . 2 



ific 


Total 


1 


1 


1 


5 


1 


18 


2 


4 




2 




10 




1 




1 


8 


8 


1 


2 


5 


6 




3 




2 


1 


1 


1 


1 




3 


7 


9 


2 


4 




1 




1 




1 




1 


2 


4 




2 



366 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Continuing at Normal Schools 



Boston Normal School 
Bridgewater Normal School 
Framingham Normal School 
Lesley Kindergarten School 
Lowell Normal School 
Salem Normal School . 
Sargent School of Phy. Educa 



Com- 


Col- 


Nor- 


Gen- 


Scien- 


mercial 


lege 
1 


mal 
2 


eral 


tific Total 
1 
2 






1 


1 


2 




1 


1 




1 

1 


2 


7 


2 


1 


12 


3 


1 




3 


7 



Continuing at Art Schools 



Mass. Normal Art School 
Museum Art School 



Continuing at Secondary Schools 



Brown & Nichols School 
Tabor Academy . 
Other Secondary Schools 



1 

1 
15 



Continuing at Commercial Schools 



Bentley School of Accounting 
Bryant & Stratton School . 
Burdett Commercial School 
Chandler Secretarial School 
Comptometer School 
Farnsworth Business School 
Fisher Business School 



1 

1 

4 

12 

2 

1 
1 



In Gainful Occupations 



Bookkeeper . 


6 


Chemist 




Elliott-Fisher Billing Mach. 


Oper. 1 


Bond Recorder 




Clerk .... 


22 


Cornetist 




Dentist's Assistant 


1 


Electrician 




Hairdresser . . . . 


1 


Milkman 




Newspaper Reporter 




Organist . . . . 


1 


Pianist 


1 


Printer .... 




Public Librarian . 


1 


Salesgirl 


1 


Salesman . . . . 


4 


Salesmanager 




Stenographer 


35 


Telephone Operator 


6 


Teacher . 





1 
1 

26 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

10 
1 

36 
7 
1 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



367 



Teacher (music) . 

Typist 

Working (unknown) 

Y. M. C. A. Worker 

At home 

Not heard from . 

Total 



Boy3 
Girls 



Com- 


Col- 


Nor- 


Gen- 


Scien- 




mercial 


lege 


mal 


eral 


tific Total 




2 








2 


'. '. '. 4 






1 




5 


3 






2 




5 


1 










1 


17 


3 




1 




21 


7 


4 

84 


1 

9 


7 
40 


4 
46 


23 


. 142 


321 


Highest 




Lowest 


Average 




Salary 




S»alary 




Salary 




Received 


Received 








.$23.00 




$12.00 




$17.00 




. 22.50 




10.00 




14.63 





SOMERVILLE TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION 
1922—1923 



Vice-Presidents, 



President, Joseph S. Hawthorne 

S George M. Hosmer 
1 Eleanor W. Nolan 

Secretary-Treasurer, Annie G. Merrill 

Executive Committee 
Charles S. Clark, Ex-Officio 



Bernice O. Newborg, High 
Elizabeth J. Mooney, Eastern Jr. 
Arthur E. Gordon, Southern Jr. 
Anna R. Walsh, Northern Jr. 
Florence M. Hopkins, Western Jr. 
Philip J. Heffernan, Boys' Voca. 
Everett W. Ireland, Continuation 
Grace E. Allen, Prescott 
Nellie W. McPheters, Hanscom 
Kate B. Gifford, Bennett 
Sue A. Fitzpatrick, Baxter 
Mary T. McCarthy, Knapp 
Mary A. Mullin, Perry 
Katherine M. Fox, Cummings 



Alice B. Frye, Pope 
Eleanor W. Nolan, Edgerly 
Monira C. Gregory, Glines 
Elizabeth J. O'Neil, Bingham 
Susie L. Luce, Carr 
Helen T. Smith, Morse 
Mary Winslow, Durell 
Alice E. Morang, Burns 
Ethel F. Morang, Proctor 
Helen L. Galvin, Brown 
Eva M. Barrows, Highland 
Clara G. Hegan, Lowe 
Alice A. Libbey, Cutler 
Lillian M. Wentworth, Lincoln 



The meetings held under the auspices of this association 
in the year 1922 were as follows : 

February 8, 1922 — Dr. Teyhi Hsieh, representative from the Arms 
Conference. Subject: "The Spirit of New China and Her 
Aspirations at Washington." Musical program by Apollo 
Quartette. 

April 20, 1922 — Informal Social. Entertainment by the MacDowell 

Quartette, assisted by Mrs. Bailey Hicks, Reader. 
November 21, 1922 — Donald B. MacMillan, Lecturer. Subject: "In 
Unknown Baffin Land," illustrated by moving pictures. 



368 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

SOMERVILLE TEACHERS' CLUB 

Officers, 1922—1923 

President, Miss Clara G. Hegan 

T .. -r, . , :• \ Mrs. Marv B. Soule 
Vice-Presidents, ( Migs Hal £ et E Tnell 

Recording Secretary, Miss Irene Vincent 
Corresponding Secretary, Miss Bernice Newborg 
Treasurer, Mrs. Bertha M. Morton 
Auditor, Miss Mary H. Joyce 

Object 

The object shall be to secure a close union among the 
women teachers in Somerville ; to promote the spirit of mutual 
helpfulness ; to advance professional interests ; to create a 
deeper sense of the dignity of the profession ; to unite the 
interests of the home and school. 

Program 

January 9 — Operalogue "Lohengrin." Mr. Havrah Hubbard. 

January 18 — Open Meeting. Lecture by David Vaughan, D. D. Mu- 
sic, Madame Florence Ferrell, Soprano. 

January 23 — Operalogue "Monna Vanna." Mr. Havrah Hubbard. 

February 15 — Club Dramatics. 

March 15 — Open Meeting — Lecture "100% Man." Mr. T. Franklin 

Babb. 
May 10 — Annual Meeting. Speaker, Margaret Slattery. 
October 11 — Dramatics. Social Evening. 

November 8 — Illustrated Lecture "South America." Albert Leonard 
Squier. 

December 8, 9 — Christmas Market. 



SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 
The Annual Report of Treasurer Jan. 1, 1923 



Receipts: 



Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1922 
Baseball games . 
Football games . 
Membership fees 
Interest on bank deposit . 
Miscellaneous 



$1,231 63 




1,583 37 




5,966 05 




158 50 




18 12 




116 30 






$9,073 97 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



369 



Expenditures: 



Athletic supplies 
Medical supplies and services 
Paid to visiting teams 
Officials 
Police . 

Assistance at games 
Printing 
Postage 

Telephone calls . 
Transportation 
Coaching 

Treasurer's salary- 
Dues to Athletic Associations 
Special expenses 
Miscellaneous expenses 

Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1923 . 



2,204 96 
306 73 

1,520 43 

361 00 

577 00 

140 00 

136 68 

9 50 

8 70 

207 85 

200 00 

400 00 

19 00 

281 70 

119 83 



$6,493 38 
$2,580 59 



George E. Pearson, 

Treasurer, 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

of the 

SOMERVILLE TEACHERS' COUNCIL 

1922 

Article I 

Name 

The Organization shall be called the Somerville Teachers' 
Council. 



Article II 
Purpose 

To provide a means of recording the expression of opin- 
ion of teachers on problems affecting the schools, the chil- 
dren, and the teachers. 

To furnish information and opinions of the teaching staff 
upon questions submitted by the School Board, the Superin- 
tendent of Schools, or initiated by the Council. 



370 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

For the introduction of recommendations concerning 
any of the problems affecting the welfare of the schools. 

To establish and expedite means of communication be- 
tween the teaching body, the Superintendent of Schools, and 
the School Board. 

To secure a more active participation of the teachers in 
the professional direction of the schools. 

To foster a spirit of dignity and responsibility in the 
teaching staff by employing its experience and judgment in 
school affairs. 

Article III 
The Council shall be allowed absolute freedom in its 
debates and deliberations. 

Article IV 
The organization of the Council as set forth in this con- 
stitution shall be sanctioned by the Superintendent of Schools 
and the School Board. 

Article V 
The Superintendent of Schools may attend the meetings 
of the Council. 

Article VI 
All recommendations or communications from the Coun- 
cil to the School Board shall be presented to the Board 
through the Secretary of that Board. 

Article VII 

The membership of the Council shall consist of ten repre- 
sentatives : 

1 from the Senior High School 

1 " " Junior High School 

1 li " Vocational Schools 

1 " '* Kindergarten School 

(First Grade 
1 " " (Second Grade 
(Third Grade 

(Fourth Grade 
1 " " (Fifth Grade 
(Sixth Grade 

1 " " Continuation School and Americanization 

1 " Supervisors and Special Teachers 

1 " " All Masters and Supervising Principals 

1 " " Masters' Assistants 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 371 

Article VIII 

Each group shall elect its own representative to the 
Council. No teacher shall be eligible for election as repre- 
sentative in more than one group. 

Any group may recall its representative by a majority 
vote of that group. 

Article IX 

Representatives shall keep in touch with their groups 
and when instructed must always voice the wishes of their 
groups. 

Article X 

The running expenses of the Teachers' Council shall be 
met by an annual assessment of ten cents (10c) per capita 
upon each Somerville teacher. The representative from each 
group shall be responsible for collecting the assessments and 
paying them to the Treasurer of the Council on or before 
October first of each record year. 

Article XI 

The official and financial year shall begin September 
first. 

Article XII 

Section I — Nominations 

Yearly the Chairman of the Council shall call within 
the second week of May a meeting of each group according 
to Article VII for the purpose of nominating the members 
of the Council. Each group shall choose a Chairman and 
a Secretary, and shall nominate by ballot twice the number 
of nominees to be voted on. Candidates receiving the high- 
est number of votes shall be the nominees. 

Section II — Preparation of the Ballot 

Immediately after the meeting noted in Section I or 
within two days thereafter, the different chairmen and secre- 
taries noted in Section I shall meet and prepare a ballot of 
the nominees, stating on each ballot how many are to be 
elected and shall send a sufficient number of ballots to each 
Principal and Special Teacher. They shall send their own 
names to the Chairman of the Council, with a list of the 
nominees. 



372 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Section III — Election 

The Chairman of the Council during the fourth week of 
May shall call meetings of the teachers for the purpose of 
electing Members of the Council. 

Section IV 

The chairmen and secretaries noted in Section I are by 
virtue of their office tellers, to collect and count all the 
ballots, and to send the ballots and results to the Chairman 
of the Council, certifying to him the names of those elected 
and the number of votes for each candidate. 

Section V 

The candidates receiving the largest number of votes 
shall be elected. 

Article XIII 

Term of Office 

The term of office of the Members of the Council shall 
be for two years. No member of the Council shall serve 
for more than two consecutive terms. 

Article XIV 
Meetings 

The regular meeting shall be held once every school 
month at such time and place as the Council shall direct. 
Special meetings may be called by the Chairman on a written 
request of six members or by the Superintendent of Schools. 

An abstract of the minutes of each meeting of the Coun- 
cil shall be prepared under the direction of the Secretary 
of the Council and a copy shall be mailed to each member 
of the Council to be circulated among the teachers of each 
group. 

Article XV 
Quorum 

At any meeting of the Council six members shall consti- 
tute a quorum for the transaction of business. 

Article XVI 
Vacancies 

Vacancies in the Council occurring on account of death, 
recall, resignation, or by reason of promotion or transfer to 
another group, shall be filled by members of the groups in 
which the vacancies occur. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



373 



Article XVII 

Officers 

The officers of the Council shall be a chairman, a vice- 
chairman, a secretary, and a treasurer, elected from its own 
members. 

Article XVIII 

Standing Committees 

The standing Committees of the Council shall be: 

1. Committee on Educational Progress 

2. Committee on Legislation 

Article XIX 

Executive Committee 

The Executive Committee shall consist of the Officers of 
the Council and chairmen of the Standing Committees. 

Article XX 

This constitution may be amended after a written notice 
of ten days has been given, by a two-thirds vote of the entire 
teaching body. 



LAYING OF THE CORNER STONE OF THE NEW JUNIOR HIGH 
SCHOOL ON MARSHALL STREET, NOVEMBER 21, 1922 

Ceremonies in connection with the laying of the corner 
stone of the new junior high school building on Marshall 
street were conducted on the afternoon of Tuesday, Novem- 
ber 21, 1922, His Honor, Mayor John M. Webster, presiding. 
Short addresses were made by John M. Webster, Mayor of 
Somerville, by Enoch B. Robertson, President of the Board 
of Aldermen, and by Dr. Herbert Cholerton, Chairman of the 
School Committee. Oscar W. Codding, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on School Accommodations, read a record of the 
School Committee taken from the meeting of January 31, 
1921, recommending the construction of a large building to 
accommodate the junior high schools known as the Northern 
Junior High School and the Eastern Junior High School. 
Music was furnished by a chorus of singers from the Northern 
Junior High School under the leadership of Miss Anna R. 



374 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Walsh. The following-named school records were deposited 
in the box which was enclosed in the corner stone. 

Manual of the public schools, 1922 

List of members of School Committee, Superintendent of 
Schools and office force, November 21, 1922. 

Annual reports of School Committee — 1914 

1919 
1920 
1921 

Constitution of the Somerville Teachers' Council 

Speech of the Chairman of the School Committee on the 
occasion of the laying of the corner stone. 

In presenting these records of the School Committee, to 
be preserved in the corner stone, the Chairman, Dr. Choler- 
ton, spoke as follows : 
Mr. Mayor : 

Under the Charter of the City of Somerville the Mayor 
and the Board of Aldermen are responsible for the erection 
and care of schoolhouses and for furnishing money for the 
support of public education. The School Committee is re- 
sponsible for the conduct of public education and for the 
use of the means placed at its disposal by coordinate branch- 
es of the City Government. It is the duty of the School 
Committee to carry on its work with the utmost regard for 
the interests and the development of the children of the 
city. It must maintain efficiently its educational undertak- 
ings and it must see that those undertakings are adequate 
and in keeping with the spirit and needs of the times. In 
the discharge of this duty the School Committee must give 
up any practice whose usefulness has been outlived and must 
adopt new procedures when such are demanded by the changes 
and advances of contemporaneous affairs. 

The duties and responsibilities, then, of the branches of 
the City Government here represented are correlative and 
supplementary. Today's ceremony is significant of the har- 
monious action of the several branches of the City Govern- 
ment in the discharge of a public duty. The building whose 
corner stone we lay this afternoon is a monument to the de- 
votion of this city to the cause of public education. It is 
expressive of a new vision, a new determination, to fit the 
youth of the city for the assumption of the powers and re- 
sponsibilities which will devolve upon them when their time 
shall come to maintain the edifice of a democracy. It is ap- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 375 

propriate that this splendid provision for the education of 
the youth of the pre-adolescent age should be made in the 
neighborhood where this type of educational work was first 
begun. 

In 1914 under the name of intermediate school this organ- 
ization of instruction was established in the Forster School. 
Two years later it was definitely adopted by the School Com- 
mittee as the policy to be followed throughout the city as 
soon as ways and means could be provided therefor. It 
was at that time decided to provide four schools to be 
known as Junior High Schools, one for each of the ma- 
jor geographical divisions of the city. In September 1916 
the Northern Junior High School was established in the 
Forster and Folsom buildings, a continuation of the For- 
ster Intermediate school, and the Eastern Junior High 
was opened in the Prescott and Southworth school- 
houses. In September 1917 the Western Junior High School 
was opened in the new building on Holland Street, the first 
schoolhouse in Somerville planned and provided for this 
special purpose, and in September 1918 the Southern Junior 
High School was opened in the Bell Schoolhouse which had 
been enlarged by an addition provided for use as a Junior 
High School. These provisions were recognized as begin- 
nings only of an undertaking which would require subse- 
quent additions of a nature and size to meet the needs of 
its proper development. Nearly three years later on Jan- 
uary 31, 1921 the School Committee adopted the following 
resolution which was presented by Oscar W. Codding, Chair- 
man of the Standing Committee on School Accommodations.. 

"That in its judgment suitable additions should be 
made to the Western and Southern Junior High School 
buildings, each to include an auditorium, gymnasium, 
and swimming pool ; and, further, that a new junior high 
school building, to provide for the needs of the district 
now cared for by the Northern and Eastern junior high 
schools should be erected at a point accessible to both 
the districts, thus releasing for elementary purposes the 
present buildings in the Northern and Eastern districts 
used for junior high school purposes. In the opinion of 
the Committee, Broadway Park would make an admir- 
able location for the proposed new building. The Com- 
mittee further recommends that the Public Property Com- 
mittee of the Board of Aldermen be invited to arrange 
a conference with the Committee on School Accommoda- 
tions of this Board." 



376 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

This recommendation was supported in substance by 
the Board of Aldermen in accepting on June 9, 1921 the re- 
port submitted by Aldermen Almon F. Heald, Chairman of 
the Committee on Public Property, and later adopting an 
order of the same tenor. 

Now Mr. Mayor, through your initiative, supported and 
made effective by the Board of Aldermen, this schoolhouse, 
imposing in size and architecture, adapted to the use to 
which it is to be put, modern in all of its parts and con- 
spicuous for the extent to which it shows consideration for 
practical utility and practical economy in connection there- 
with, has been provided. It will give a maximum of service. 
It will be an ornament and an honor to this city. For years 
to come it will be a great public instrumentality devoted to 
preparing youth for the struggles of life. 

Mr. Mayor, on behalf of the School Committee, on be- 
half of the citizens of Somerville whose representatives we 
all are, and on behalf of the countless children whose educa- 
tion will be received in part in this spacious and beautiful 
building, and whose interests are to us all alike dear and 
sacred, I express profound satisfaction and gratitude in this 
ceremony which witnesses the will of the city acting through 
its responsible agents in the promotion of a public enterprise 
of the greatest importance. 

And now Mr. Mayor, as a further participation of the 
School Committee in these ceremonies I hand to you these 
documents, to be placed among the records which will be 
preserved in the corner stone of this building through the 
limitless years while it shall endure. 



STATEMENT OF WORK OF SCHOOL NURSES. 
For Year Ending June 30, 1922. 




REMARKS 

September: Received temporary dental reservations at Boston Dispensary. Assisted in general medical inspections. Two cases taken to Psycho- 
pathic Hospital. Hygiene talks given in classes. 

October: Assisted doctors in medical inspections. Child taken to Somerville Hospital for suture in lacerated finger. Appointment made for 
operation at Boston Dispensary. Conference held with school nurse in Medford, and with social workers at Boston Dispensary. Hygiene 
talks given in classes. 

November: Assisted doctors in medical inspections. Children referred to School Dentist, Mass. General Hospital, Tufts Dental Clinic, Porsythe 
Dental Clinic. Conference held with social worker at Boston Dispensary. Orthopedic case at Boston Dispensary. X-ray case at Boston Dis- 
pensary. Consultation held with church worker concerning family. Conference of school nurses attended at Boston. Two pair of glasses provided 
through the Junior Red Cross. 108 children taken to Forsythe Dental Clinic. Hygiene talks given in classes. 

December: Clothing obtained for child in Bennett district. Consultations held with Forsythe Dental regarding reservations. Consultation with S. 
P. C. C. Assisted doctors in medical inspections. Arranged for two tonsils and adenoids operations. Children chosen for Xmas party at 
one of the churches. Two Xmas dinners provided by school for families. Contagion found in school, impetigo. 262 children taken to clinics 
at Forsythe Dental and Boston Dispensary for cleansings and treatments. Hygiene talks in several classes. 

January: Children recommended to School Dentist for treatment. 141 children taken to Forsythe and Boston Dispensary for cleansings. Hy- 
giene talks in classes. Consultation with social workers at Boston Dispensary and Forsythe Dental. 

February: Aid given children by Junior Red Cross and Red Cross. Children referred to School Dentist. Child entered as house patient at 
Boston Dispensary for congenital hip operation. Junior Red Cross to help pay expenses. Glasses provided by Junior Red Cross. Hygiene talks 
in several classes. 33S children taken to Forsythe Dental and Boston Dispensary for treatment. 

March: Children referred to School Doctor for inspection and to Sichool Dentist for treatment. Consultations held with social workers at Mass. 
General Hospital and Boston Dispensary. Assisted doctors in medical inspection. Sent notices of defects to parents. Special case examined 
at Boston Dispensary for tuberculosis. Visted Horace Mann school, Boston, for conference concerning Somerville children. Arranged to have 
boy examined at Psychopathic Hospital. Children referred to Tufts Dental for treatment. Arranged for two tonsils operations. Hygiene 
talks given. 316 children taken to Forsythe Dental and Boston Dispensary for treatments and cleansings. 

April: Consultation with Psychopathic Hospital concerning two children. Expense of tonsil and adenoid operation taken over by Junior Red 
Cross. Arranged for children to visit school dentist. Hygiene talks in several classes. Mirror-writer found in school, taken to Children's 
Clinic, to eye clinic, and to Neurological clinic; case discharged as a proficiency rather than a deficiency. 262 children taken to Boston 
Dispensary and Forsythe Dental for cleansings and treatment. 

May: Consulted with Children's Hospital concerning child to be operated on during the month. Children referred to School Dentist for treat- 
ment. Assisted doctors in medical inspections. Frames for new glasses provided by Junior Red Cross. New glasses provided by Junior 
Red Cross. Consulted with social worker at Boston Dispensary. Hygiene talks in classes. 189 children taken to Forsythe Dental and Boston 
Dispensary for treatment and cleansings. 

June: Glasses paid for by Junior Red Cross. Tonsils and adenoids operation paid for by Junior Red Cross. Hygiene talks in several classes. As- 
sisted school doctors. 34 children taken to dental clinics foi treatment. Arrangements made for summer treatments at Forsythe Dental. 



•Treated by family physician or dentist. 



XNew : Seen first time during the school year. 
+ 01d: Cases followed up. 



378 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



3ht iMem0rtam 

MARTHA A. JENCKS 

Lowe School 

Died March 10, 1922 



ella p. mcleod 

Proctor School 
Died May 3, 1922 



MATHILDA C. WRIGHT 

High School 

Died September 24, 1922 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 379 

CONTENTS OF APPENDIX 



SUMMARY OP STATISTICS 

Population and school census. 

School buildings. 

Teachers. 

Attendance for year. 

Cost of school maintenance. 

Teachers' salaries. 

Results of eye and ear tests. 

MISCELLANEOUS TABLES 
CONCERNING FINANCE 

No. of Table. 

1. Schedule of school property. 

2. Cost of maintaining schools, school year 1921-1922. 

3. Cost per capita of maintaining schools, school year 1921-1922. 

4. Cost of maintaining schools for a series of years. 

5. Cost per capita for maintaining schools for a series of years. 

6. Amount spent annually for new school buildings and for re- 

pairs for a series of years. 

CONCERNING PUPILS 

7. Population and school registration. 

8. Attendance, etc., of the schools for school year 1921-1922. 

9. Statistics of the high school for school year 1921-1922. 

10. Pupils by grades, June, 1922. 

11. Separate statistics for high, junior high, elementary and vo- 

cational schools, for school year 1921-1922. 

12. Admissions to first grade in September. 

13. Number of junior high school graduates, 1922. 

14. Truant statistics for a series of years. 

15. Evening school statistics, 1921-1922. 

16. Grammar school promotees for a series of years. 

17. Attendance statistics of all schools for a series of years. 

18. Statistics of the high school for a series of years. 

19. Promotions, junior high schools, 1922. 
19a Promotions, elementary schools, 1922. 

CONCERNING TEACHERS 

20. Resignations of teachers, 1922. 

21. Teachers .elected in 1922. 

22. Leave of absence of teachers. 

23. Transfers of teachers. 

24. Number of teachers employed for a series of years. 

STATISTICAL AND GENERAL TABLES 

25. Changes in textbooks, 1922. 

26. High and Junior High school graduation exercises, 1922. 

27. Vocational school graduation exercises, 1922. 

28. Organization of school board for 1923. 

29. Teachers in service January, 1923. 

30. Officers in service January, 1923. 

31. School janitors. 



380 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS 

1.— POPULATION AND SCHOOL CENSUS 

Population, state census, 1895 52,200 

Population, United States census, 1900 61,645 

Population, state census, 1905 69,272 

Population, United States census, 1910 77,236 

Population, state census, 1915 86,854 

Population, United States census, 1920 93,033 

Children between five and sixteen years of age, April, 1922, 

by school census 16,717 

2.— SCHOOL BUILDINGS 

Number of school buildings in June 30 

Number of classrooms in use in June 380 

Valuation of school property $2,284,000 

3.— TEACHERS 



In high schools 

In junior high schools 

In elementary schools 

In kindergartens 

Total in elementary schools 
Vocational school for boys . 
Independent Household Arts 

Atypical classes 

Sight Saving 

Cadet teachers 

Special 

Continuation 

Americanization 

Total 



♦1921 


•1922 


Change 


75 


72 


—3 


116 


114 


—2 


211 


211 





13 


13 





224 


224 





9 


8 


— 1 


2 


1 


— 1 


3 


3 







1 


+1 


5 


10 


+5 


11 


9 


—2 


5 


5 





2 


2 






452 



449 



4.— ATTENDANCE FOR YEAR 



Entire enrollment for the year... 

Average number belonging 

Average number attending 

Per cent, of daily attendance 

High school graduates 

Junior High school graduates... 



•1921 

14,500 

13,396 

12,533 

93.6 

316 

877 



•1922 

15,225 

14,004 

13,160 

94.0 

613 

952 



Change 

+725 
+ 608 
+ 627 

+0.4 
+297 

+75 



5.— COST OF SCHOOL MAINTENANCE 

•1921 *1922 Change 

Salaries of teachers $700,975.75 $734,752 79 +$33,777 03 

Salaries of officers 13,883 66 13,152 17 —731 49 

Cost of books and supplies.... 26,328 84 42,682 31 +16,353 47 

Cost of light 12,162 57 10,531 27 —1,631 30 

Cost of janitors' services 61,435 42 61,987 24 +551 82 

Cost of fuel 63,016 60 26,520 98 —36,495 62 

* School year 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 381 

Rent of Armory 350 00 250 00 —100 00 

Total cost of day and evening 

schools 878,152 85 889,876 76 +11,723 91 

Per capita cost 66 55 59 18 — 7 37 

Cost of high school instruc- 
tion 125,319 48 137,088 15 +11,768 67 

Per capita cost 75 77 71 54 —4 23 



6.— MISCELLANEOUS 

*1921 *1922 Change 

Paid for new school build- 
ings $3,285 00 $7,575 86 +$4,290 86 

Repairs and permanent 

improvements 39,573 47 36,628 82 —2,944 65 

Total school expenditures 921,011 32 934,081 44 +13,070 12 

Number of dollars spent 
to maintain schools out 
of every $1,000 of valua- 
tion 10 12 10 09 —0 03 

Valuation of city 86,718,289 60 88,158,139 27 +1,439,849 67 

Number of dollars spent 
for all school purposes 
out of every $1,000 of 
valuation 10 62 10 59 —0 03 



* School year. 



Cost of the Schools 



The total amount spent for the maintenance of the 
schools of Somerville for the school year ending June 30> 
1922, is 1889,876.76. 

This includes the sums spent for care of school build- 
ings, including janitors' services, fuel, light, and school tele- 
phones ; the amount paid for salaries of officers, and the 
amount spent for school supplies ; and the sum paid for sal- 
aries of teachers. 

The expenditure for care for school buildings is wholly 
in charge of the City Government. 

The amount paid for janitors is 

The cost of fuel is 

The cost of light is 

Rental of Armory 



A total cost of 



The cost per capita 
Cost of repairs . 



$61,987 


24 


26,520 


98 


10,531 


27 


250 


00 


$99,289 49 


7 


03 


36,628 


82 



The second important expenditure is wholly under the 
control of the School Committee and is covered by what is 
known as the "School Contingent" appropriation. The fol- 
lowing is the itemized account : — 



382 



ANNUAL REPORTS 





Day Schools. 


Evening Schools. 


Continuation 
Schools and 


Expenditures. \ Total. 


High and 
Vocational 


Elementary 


High and 
Vocational 


Elementary 


Americaniza- 
tion work 


Officers' Sala- 
ries | $13,152.17 












Office Expenses 2,974.05 












Textbooks ! 9 . 615 .05 


$4,409.63 

13,345.73 
2,354.58 


$5,137.99 

10,975.62 
2,207.91 


$31.50 

$633.25 
136.10 




$35.93 


Stationery and 
Supplies and 
Other Ex- 
penses of In- 
struction 

Miscellaneous 
(Tuition, etc.) 


25,345.17 
4,748.04 


$42.80 
8.00 


347.77 
41.45 


Total 


$55,834.48 


$20,109.94 


$18,321.52 


$800.85 


$50.80 


$425.15 



The third, and by far the largest, element of the cost of 
schools is the sum spent for the salaries of teachers. This 
expenditure is under the control of the School Committee. 

The following statement shows the distribution of the 
sums paid for salaries : — 





Day Schools. 


Evening Schools. 


Continuation 
Schools and 


Expenditures. 


Total. 


££fiSi|*-rf * 


High and 
Vocational 


Elementary 


Americaniza- 
tion work 


1 
Supervisors $1 1.523. 00 


$2,003.46 
13,325.00 

208,997.57 


$8,944.54 

35,364.00 

443,391.47 






$575.00 


Principals 

Teachers 


53,305.00 
669.924.79 


$892.00 
6.058.75 


$924.00 
987.00 


2,800.00 
10,490.00 










Total 


$734,752.79 


$224,326.03 


$487,700.01 


$6,950.75 


$1,911.00 


$13,865.00 







The total outlay for all school purposes includes all of 
the preceding and the sums spent for schoolhouse repairs and 
new buildings. 

The total outlay for the school year ending June 30, 1922, 

is as follows : — 

Care $99,289 49 

Contingent 42,682 31 

Salaries 747,904 96 

Total for school maintenance $889,876 76 

Paid for repairs 36,628 82 

Paid for new buildings 7,575 86 

Total for all school purposes $934,081 44 

Each dollar of the sum spent for the support of schools 
has been divided in the following proportion : — 






$134,373 06 $171.00 $2.6 



337 211 $2,608 1 
319 3G MOO ( 



0,185 60 76 00 378 51 21.H0 U 

■0,043 00 179 00 747 36 2,325 00 23,294 3 



62 22 9 82 



$325 1U $424 



42 46 
16 11 



SuDpllo* Supplier 

$2.6 60 

$4 20 39 66 



EXPENDITURES CONTROL 



FOR THE YEAR 



i 58 3 60 



i 82 36 18 



i 23 74 ! 



52 34 39 62 3 15 

6 13 6 80 1 04 

1 35 

76 76 10 20 1G 80 



31 60 9 66 



101)9.741 24 $4,391 00 $18,141 ",0 ilS.423 



$615 55 $1,172 49 $166 52 $4,1 



$1,899 98 $743 61 $1,671 08 



$227 86 $6 77 $81 ' 



$332 US $32 ( 



J6°7 69* J52™05 

46 18 7 35 

56 23 8 80 



24 43 1 60 



33 92 25 






- Lincoln 

Atypical 

Sigbt Saving 

■ - Boys' Vocational 

independent Household Arts 

Evening High 

Evening. Bell 

— .Evening. Western 



$1,106 66 . $616 06 $927 E 



$723 77 $205 10 $180 12 $35 25 $894 02 $2,822 92 $1,847 09 $346 42 $786 09 $1,117 22 $137 62 $232 40 $406 17 $416 05 $154 65 $560 33 $42,9 



CLASSIFIED STATEMENT SHOWING 



SCHOOL 

High 

Eastern Jr 

Southern Jr 

Northern Jr 

Western Jr 

Prescott 

Hanscom 

Bennett 

Baxter 

Knapp 

Perry 

Pope : 

Cummings 

Edgerly 

Glines 

Forster 

Bingham 

Carr 

Morse 

Proctor 

Durell 

Burns 

Brown 

Highland 

Cutler 

Lincoln 

Lowe 

Atypical 

Sight Saving 

Boys' Vocational 

Independent Househ'd Arts.. 

Evening High 

Evening, Bell 

Evening, Western 

Evening, Vocational 

Americanization 

Evening, Practical Arts 

Continuation 

Dental 

Administration 

Miscellaneous 

Total 



Regular 

$134,373 05 

38,725 86 

54,874 70 

40,781 72 

58,662 40 

10,534 75 

16,068 50 

16,956 00 

7,960 00 

15,664 13 

8,114 00 

1S.366 50 

7,377 50 

20,185 50 

20,043 00 

6,460 00 

23,687 38 

23,949 00 

16,060 00 

11,862 00 

6,610 50 

13,528 00 

16,699 00 

12,150 50 

29,425 50 

6,474 50 

13,217 00 

4,850 00 

759 50 

18,720 50 

2,285 50 

4,560 00 

1,080 00 

693 00 

997 25 

7,227 00 

1,128 00 

7,095 50 

1,534 00 



Substitute 
$171.00 

204 00 

157 00 

155 00 

273 00 

90 00 

192 00 

285 50 

113 00 

221 00 

185 00 

229 00 



TEACHERS 



76 00 
179 00 

10 00 
324 00 
215 00 
111 00 
190 00 

35 00 

72 00 

55 00 
206 00 
358 00 

53 00 
154 50 

12 00 

65 00 



Special 
$2,682 04 

1,087 43 

1,087 32 

1,087 39 

1,087 37 

243 45 

337 20 

500 40 

319 36 

600 75 

378 44 

728 99 

213 94 

878 51 
747 36 

226 09 

807 36 

871 10 

536 S9 

466 17 

194 10 

299 00 

540 31 

859 17 

897 19 

194 04 

270 38 



Kindergarten Total 

$137,226 09 

40,017 29 

56,119 02 

42,024 11 

60,022 77 

10,868 20 

$2,608 75 19,206 45 

2,316 50 20,058 40 

1,400 00 9,792 36 

16,485 88 

8,677 44 

19,324 49 

7,591 44 

21,140 01 

2,325 00 23,294 36 
6,696 09 

2,280 00 27,098 74 
25,035 10 

2,135 00 1S.842 89 

12,518 17 

6,839 60 

13,899 00 

17,294 31 

13,215 67 

2,358 50 33,039 19 

6,721 54 

13,641 88 

4,862 00 

759 50 

18,785 50 

2,285 50 

4,560 00 

1,080 00 

693 00 

997 25 

7,227 00 

1,128 00 

7,095 50 

1,534 00 



$13,527 18 



1 00 

2 68 



44 23 
8 21 



Adminis- 
tration 


Books 
$2,949 
452 
829 
746 
1,464 
262 
175 
211 

54 
299 
126 
313 

98 
262 
290 
195 
255 
341 
172 
222 

91 
191 
213 
186 
297 
156 
165 

10 

16 


i 

67 
52 
32 
08 
72 
73 
05 
13 
64 
04 
34 
83 
71 
00 
84 
71 
19 
71 
40 
96 
94 
35 
36 
22 
20 
39 
23 
68 
19 


Bookpg. Bookbii 
Blanks and Su 

$615 55 $610 
112 


iding 
pplies 

32 

51 

02 


Maps 
Charts 

$40 42 


Whit. 
Pape: 

$1,018 

235 

324 

352 

406 

39 

70 

51 

18 

113 

34 

98 

16 

99 

103 

35 

103 

124 

31 

44 

17 

55 

66 

41 

133 

25 

52 

6 


t 

r 
11 




52 




142 


9 


83 


27 






31 




56 


03 






37 






1 

1 
1 


24 
96 
39 
11 
14 


63 




2 


31 


Rfl 






65 








52 




29 


32 


67 






:>s 




12 


60 


9 


96 


56 






99 




44 


27 
96 


9 


25 

24 


66 




51 


64 






?A 




23 


62 






9« 






6 
9 
2 


99 
86 

98 


Kfi 




12 


21 
52 


61 




14 


18 






4? 




8 


58 
22 


18 
9 
1 

17 


65 
82 

78 
48 
90 


66 




52 


fl8 






18 








76 








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84 












13 








12 


44 





75 


76 


33 

3 
3 


22 
95 
66 


11 


30 


11 


88 


63 

18S 


97 
27 



Manila 

Paper 

$325 10 

93 05 
134 45 

88 42 
126 33 

42 46 
61 48 

66 92 
15 11 
53 49 

28 42 
78 58 
19 01 

77 97 

78 20 

18 40 
80 68 

67 27 

43 16 

29 58 
23 96 
55 77 
37 69 
33 08 

79 43 

19 01 
39 52 

5 80 

1 35 

10 20 



15 
6 
3 


36 
56 
45 


1 


08 


4 


67 




34 


97 



Blank 
Books 
$424 31 
40 95 
58 80 
23 63 
42 00 



10 50 
7 88 



11 03 

52 

3 15 

1 04 



16 


80 


15 
3 

1 


75 
15 
05 


8 


40 


6 


30 




6 


05 



Pencils, 
Pens, etc. 
$380 38 
69 95 
94 68 
78 93 
78 94 
22 58 

30 26 

68 14 
20 05 

34 20 
28 37 
40 00 
17 60 

69 39 
58 00 

26 78 
58 41 

35 18 

36 45 

27 27 
20 55 
26 76 
53 25 
45 91 
63 04 
20 49 
48 62 

5 65 
2 50 

31 60 



25 

9 

• 6 


88 
67 
40 


20 


04 


8 


95 


6 


21 





$367 93 

12 06 

17 83 

10 21 

12 93 

3 50 

7 18 

7 16 

2 20 

10 65 

2 22 

3 46 
2 03 

10 00 
5 78 
1 90 
5 48 

4 20 
7 71 

1 93 
76 

2 64 
4 56 
4 17 

16 69 

4 45 

2 24 

56 



9 65 
1 38 

21 52 
1 26 



255 21 
23 88 



Domestic 
Science 
Supplies 



$4 20 

23 66 

9 38 

11 39 



26 96 
8 42 



DISTRIBUTION OF EXPENDITURES 

Seat Work 
and 

Kindergarten 
Slupplies 



Drawing 

Supplie? 

$276 60 

39 66 

27 46 

31 58 

32 20 
9 20 

12 09 
30 05 

6 67 

15 90 

7 48 

14 52 

4 15 

21 76 

16 93 

5 60 

22 41 
18 74 

8 83 

9 76 

4 63 

5 50 

15 58 

17 30 
25 23 

4 15 

16 24 



2 52 
215 27 



58 10 
2 42 



128 23 



Laboratory 
Supplies 

$927 55 



11 


33 


41 


47 


61 


10 


19 


60 


10 


29 


4 


22 


13 


50 


11 


35 


5 


13 


31 


61 


2 


35 


56 


27 


17 


27 


59 


43 


4 


70 


4 


35 


28 


36 


26 


58 


74 


81 


11 


04 


32 


10 


32 


26 


46 


34 



1,741 24 $4,391 00 $18,141 75 $15,423 75 $737,697 74 $13,527 18 $11,116 77 



$615 55 $1,172 49 



$156 52 $4,113 23 



$1,899 98 



$743 61 $1,671 08 



$848 64 



$86 17 $1,106 66 



$616 06 



$927 55 



IE3 CONTROLLED BY THE SCHOOL BOARD FOR THE YEAR 1922. 











Typewriter 










Supplies 










and 




Lumber 


Hardware 


Metal 


Repairs 


J1.878 67 


$350 83 


$227 85 


$6 77 


$81 79 




14S 89 
169 51 


41 37 
31 44 




28 70 


118 91 


32 81 


15 18 


104 80 


398 26 
644 42 


44 15 
127 08 




4 73 


697 62 


45 22 


23 32 



1 18 

2 35 
2 35 
4 14 
1 55 

19 16 

1,217 69 

9 96 

99 95 



3 15 

95 43 



7 69 
322 66 



4 17 

225 14 180 30 



$4,920 63 



$2,079 05 



$723 77 



$265 10 



15 81 
9 59 



$180 12 



Piano 
Tuning 



$8 25 



4 00 
9 50 



3 00 
7 00 



Gradua- 
tion 

Expenses 
$614 94 
38 65 
60 78 
43 93 
66 34 



27 82 
21 42 



Printing 
$332 08 
5 34 
5 35 
28 60 
5 35 



$2,822 92 



918 35 
426 36 



Postage 
$32 00 

"Too 

2 00 

8 50 



1 16 

2 75 



8 41 


9 00 
4 00 


87 84 
8 58 
4 08 


14 20 
2 16 


4 08 




8 59 

i 08 


3 37 
2 45 



246 


37 

10 



Electric 
Power 
$259 00 



Telephone 
$67 69 
46 18 
63 92 
56 23 
89 51 



24 
38 


15 
95 


35 


55 


28 


02 


29 
33 


65 
33 



79 68 
25 37 



1 05 

20 

283 96 



Express 

$52 05 

7 35 

60 

6 30 

5 15 

1 00 

2 10 



24 


43 


1 60 


i>,5 


12 
47 
38 




a a 




27 


25 






25 






60 


39 


81 


60 


33 


92 


25 


27 


78 


9 48 
50 


11 


87 


60 



1 55 
33 84 



$232 40 



TraveJ 

$10 25 

36 59 

6 05 

11 33 

12 61 
8 32 

12 15 



20 35 
3 10 
1 10 



8 60 
11 85 



12 30 
21 10 



■ 5 00 
14 25 



207 45 
6 65 



$154 65 



laneous 


$56 95 


11 


57 


3 


43 


5 


59 


10 


80 




24 


6 


99 


16 


83 


5 


01 


25 


34 


9 


67 


5 


61 


1 


80 


5 


05 


5 


37 


1 


16 


8 


01 


8 


46 


12 


30 


5 


32 


6 


14 


2 


81 


4 


35 


11 


47 


10 


68 


1 


41 


6 


58 


2 


74 


4 


78 


35 


32 



10 62 
1 02 



106 40 
130 14 



Total 

$11,906 81 High 

1.804 95 Eastern Jr. 

2,172 30 Southern Jr. 

2,050 46 Northern Jr. 

3,976 33 Western Jr. 

402 28 Prescott 

444 87 Hanscom 

809 65 Bennett 

I 44 91 Baxter 

663 61 Knapp 

243 63 Perry 

623 89 p p e 

172 69 Cummlngs 

638 89 Eagerly 

693 28 Glines 

289 24 Porster 

665 10 Bingham 

659 12 carr 

422 86 Morse 

395 03 Proctor 

171 58 Durell 

399 84 Burns 

540 30 Brown 

383 29 Highland 

783 56 Cutler 

247 17 Lincoln 

383 13 Lowe 

80 43 Atypical 

118 08 Sight Saving 

3,014 16 Boys' Vocational 

48 21 Independent Household Arts 

412 84 Evening High 

60 19 Evening, Bell 

18 64 EVenlng, Western 

197 34 Evening, Vocational 

59 83 Americanization 

9 68 Evening, Practical Arts 

266 76 Continuation 

Dental 

2,785 55 Administration 

3,837 63 Miscellaneoui 



$35 25 



$894 02 $2,822 92 $1,847 09 



$345 42 



$786 09 $1,117 22 



$187 52 



$232 40 



$406 17 



$416 05 



$154 65 



$560 33 $42,998 11 



SCHOOL 


DEPARTMENT. 






6#6 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


$0,076 


$0,079 


$0,097 


$0,074 


$0,070 


$0,070 


0.066 


0.081 


0.057 


0.063 


0.085 


0.042 


0.018 


0.017 


0.017 


0.020 


0.015 


0.015 


0.062 


0.064 


0.087 


0.053 


0.030 


0.048 


0.778 


0.759 


0.762 


0.790 


0.800 


0.825 



Janitors' salaries .... 

Heat and light 

Administration 

School supplies 

Teachers' salaries 



Total $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 

Per Capita Cost. The proper method of comparison of 
the cost of schools year by year is to consider the sum spent 
for each pupil in the average membership. In this computa- 
tion we exclude the cost of evening schools, and the voca- 
tional schools. The following shows : — 



CM 



Q 

z 
< 



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384 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Including the cost of maintenance of evening schools, the 
per capita cost is as follows : — 

1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 

Cost of Instruction '. $29 58 $31 82 $44 34 $50 07 $50 90 

Cost of Supplies 2 40 2 45 2 80 1 60 2 77 

Cost of Care 6 09 6 43 7 45 9 62 6 73 

Total $38 07 $40 70 $54 59 $61 29 $60 40 

An examination of these tables shows that we have paid 
$4.33 less for the instruction of each pupil in the High 
School than in 1921, and $2.11 more per pupil for supplies. 

The elementary schools have cost 14 cents more per pu- 
pil for instruction, and 83 cents more for supplies. 

The amount spent for the school year 1922 was $10.09, 
or 3 cents less than was spent in 1921. The amount yielded 
for each child in the average membership of the schools for 
1922, not including the vocational schools, was $60.40. 



Teachers' Salaries 

The salaries paid to teachers in January, 1923, are as 
follows : — 



1 man $4,100 



1 

4 
7 
1 
1 
3 
4 
5 
3 
6 
4 
9 
1 
18 



man 

men 

men, 

man 

man, 

men 

men 

men 

men, 

men, 

men 

men, 

man ... 

women 



1 woman 



1 woman 



woman 
women 



6 women 



3,300 
3,100 
3,000 
2,900 
2,800 
2,700 
2,500 
2,300 
2,200 
2,100 
2,000 
1,900 
1,800 
1,750 



women 



1 man, 3 
25 women 

2 men, 16 
1 woman 

*1 man, 

1 man, 221 

20 women 

24 women 

1 woman 

11 women 

1 woman 

13 women 

4 women 

1 man*, 5 women 



women $1,700 

1,650 

women 1,600 

1,575 



4 women 1,550 

1,500 

1,450 

1,400 

1,350 

1,300 

.... 1,250 

.... 1,200 

.... 1,100 

.... 1,000 



•Part time. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



385 



SIGHT AND HEARING 



The following give the results of the eye and ear tests 



Eyes 



Tested 

Defective 

Per cent, defective 

Notices sent to parents 
Professionally treated . 



Ears 



Tested 

Defective 

Per cent, defective 

Notices sent to parents 
Professionally treated ... 



1922 


1921 


Change 


13,948 


12,833 


+ 1,115 


1,567 


1,669 


—102 


11% 


13% 


—2% 


1,135 


1,089 


+46 


193 


173 


+20 


1922 


1921 


Change 


13,989 


13,711 


+278 


161 


206 


—45 


1.2% 


1.5% 


— 0.3% 


101 


139 


—38 


20 


26 


—6 



386 



ANNUAL REPORTS 







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cc" i— ~r-rcc~00 G 


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CO 


LO C>3 r-i *M 


H^HH CO 


rH r- 1 7-* 




9.So^ 














hJ 




-:— * 




OS 




COOOIOHOOMNCONCDOH 


CO H^ OO 




SCONHCXOO^QOOOOOi 


OS CO CO 


CO 


sSnitftts jo -ox 


os >o H< os io -H -H co co co cm cm 


i—l rH rH 


'CO 




oo 




rH 


suioojssbio jo ox 


^^lOONOOCOOMCK! OO 


H< -* f 


<M 


IOHHNHHH* 




OS 




<M 




CO 














<M • • • 


































ft 






































M o 






































^ 







































=1*2 




































-r 


So 




































■S' 


3 a 
1 o 




































c3 


^ a 










o3 
























PIS 


3-^ 














< 


? 






















^ - 










fc 


O 

+3 






















O ; 
o3 + 


3 

H 

3 










,d 






















a o 


3 _ 








E 


■ <- 

\ & 

— 


r 


< 

u 


-1- 
*; 

i 
z 

a 


c 

- 

9 

-H 


'J 


z 

'■ t 

c 

i 


y 
J PC 


a 

5 


H 

■ y 


- 


c 

> 

Z 
+~ 


K 



' l 

V H 


r c 


3 

'a 

1 


o 


13 

+3 

o 
H 



TJ 



u 



388 



ANNVAL REPORTS 



Table 2. — Cost of Maintaining Schools. 



FOR SCHOOL YEAR 1921-22. 



Schools. 



High 

Eastern Jr 

Southern Jr 

Northern Jr 

Western Jr 

Prescott 

Hanscom 

Bennett 

Baxter 

Knapp 

Perry 

Pope 

Cummings 

Edgerly 

Glines 

Forster 

Bingham 

Carr 

Morse 

Proctor 

Diirell 

Burns 

Brown 

Highland 

Cutler 

Lincoln 

Lowe 

Atypical 

Sight Saving 

Boys' Vocational 

Independent House- 
hold Arte 

Evening 

Continuation 

Americanization 



From School Appropriation. 



Spent by City 
Government. 



Instruction 

and 
Supervision. 

$138,819.70 
40,941.68 
57,154.07 
42. -232.94 
61,035,96 
10,982.69 
19,214.69 
21,072.84 
10,788.52 
16,407.46 

8,859.42 
19,630.73 

7,695.85 
21,905.67 
23,819.88 

6,922.80 
26,866.23 
25,489.54 
18,916.01 
12,296.31 

7,003.38 
14,229.48 
17,690.78 
14,087.67 
32,931.21 

6,893.39 
14,121.86 

4,643.58 

145.82 

19,458.20 

2,434.85 
9,052.55 
7,359.45 
6,799.75 



Total ! $747,904.96 



Supplies. 

$13,355.16 

2,100.08 

3,019.20 

2,151.57 

2,800.77 

371.25 

690.44 

1,136.70 

289.61 

617.16 

374.35 

692.96 

312.69 

755.99 

994.90 

281.40 

1,325.77 

878.33 

929.39 

535.17 

226.38 

425.39 

683.91 

539.94 

1,623.71 

264.01 

440.00 

69.05 

56.44 

3,412.95 

49.04 
778.65 
410.63 

89.32 



$42,682.31 



Care. 

$17,447.85 
4,716.02 
5,083.15 
4,774.16 
4,887.44 
1,241.07 
2,346.95 
2,958.49 
1,829.36 
3,232.91 
1,829.36 
2,978.54 
1,531.57 
2,978.52 
2,864.97 
1,531.58 
3,162.38 
3,723.17 
2.978.54 
2,101.17 
1,531.57 
2,101.17 
2,4S2.12 
2,565.11 
4,694.16 
1,531.57 
2,101.16 
726.14 
20.18 
2,261.43 

855.46 
1,972.40 
1,009.24 
1,240.58 



Total 



$169 
47 
65 
49 
68 
12 
22 
25 
12 
20 
11 



9 
25 
27 

8 
31 
30 
22 
14 



16 
20 
17 
39 

8 
16 

5 



,622.71 
,757.78 
,256.42 
,158.67 
,724.17 
,595.01 
,252.08 
,168.03 
,907.49 
,257.53 
,063.13 
,302.23 
,540.11 
,640.18 
,679.75 
,735.78 
,354.38 
,091.04 
,823.94 
,932.65 
,761.33 
,756.04 
,856.81 
,192.72 
,249.0a 
,688.97 
,663.02 
,438.77 
222.44 
132.58 



25, 



3.339.35 

11,803.60 

8,779.32 

8,129.65 



$99,289.49 |$S89, 876.76 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



389 



Table 3. — Per Capita Cost of Maintaining Schools. 



FOR SCHOOL YEAR 1921-22. 



Schools. 



High 

Eastern Jr 

Southern Jr 

Northern Jr 

Western Jr 

Prescott 

Hanscorn 

Bennett 

Baxter 

Knapp 

Perry 

Pope 

Cumniings 

Edgerly 

Glines 

Forster 

Bingham 

Carr 

Morse 

Proctor 

Durell 

Burns 

Brown 

Highland 

Cutler 

Lincoln 

Lowe 

Atypical 

Sight Saving 

Evening 

Continuation 

Americanization 

Elementary 

All schools (without 
state-aided schools) 



Boys' Vocational 

Ind. Household Arts. 



Instruction 

and 
Supervision. 



Supplies. 



$72.87 
64.58 
57.50 
62.85 
60.25 
38.13 
40.54 
44.65 
54.21 
42.28 
46.38 
37.39 
42.05 
38.59 
37.57 
37.02 
41.02 
41.85 
42.41 
39.54 
40.72 
44.19 
46.93 
43.89 
42.00 
47.54 
39.78 

100.95 
20.83 
13.59 
70.09 
26.05 
41.84 

50.90 



$6.97 
3.31 
3.04 
3.20 
2.76 
1.29 
1.46 
2.41 
1.46 
1.59 
1.96 



.32 

,71 
.34 
,57 
.50 
2.02 
1.43 
2.08 
1.72 
1.32 
1.32 
1.81 



.68 
.07 
.82 
.24 
.50 
8.06 
1.17 
3.91 
.34 
1.67 

2.77 



163.51 
122.60 



28.68 
1.29 



Care. 



Total. 



$9.11 
7.44 
5.11 
7.10 
4.82 
4.31 
4.95 
6.27 
9.19 
8.33 
9.58 
5.67 
8.37 
5.27 
4.52 
8.19 
4.83 
6.11 
6.68 
6.76 
8.90 
6.53 
6.58 
7.99 
5.99 

10.56 
5.92 

15.79 
2.88 
2.96 
9.61 
4.75 
6.35 

6.73 



19.00 
22.51 



$88.95 
75.33 
65.65 
73.15 
67.83 
43.73 
46.95 
53.33 
64.86 
52.20 
57.92 
44.38 
52.13 
45.20 
43.66 
46.71 
47.87 
49.39 
51.17 
48.02 
50.94 
52.04 
55.32 
53.56 
50.06 
59.92 
46.94 

118.24 
31.77 
17.72 
83.61 
31.14 
49.86 

60.40 



211.19 
156.40 



390 



A N X r AL REPORTS 



Table 4. — Annual Cost of Maintaining the Schools. 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 

Amounts are given to the nearest dollar and include what has been paid 
for maintaining day and evening schools of all grades. 



Year. 



1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 



- Average 
Member- 
ship. 



11,710 
11,856 
12,320 
12,903 
13,191 
12,770 
12,656 
12,733 
12,836 
13,396 
14,109 



From School Appro- 
priation. 



Sum Spent under Direction of 
Crry Government. 



Instruction 

and Super- 

vision. 

$306,709 i 
320,744 
338,587 
357,581 
363,948 
376,138 ; 
410,589 
437,730 
613,294 
714,859 
747,905 



School 
Supplies. 

830,319 
25,877 
26,843 
29,389 
26,098 
29,221 
33,587 
33,225 
40,079 
26,329 

! 42,682 



Light. Heating. Janitors. 



School 
Tele- 
phones. 



Total. 



$5,995 

5,842 

6,448 

5,755 

6,233 

5,429 

6,966 

8,821 

10,092 

12,163 

10,531 



815,676 
16,055 
18,952 
18,366 
20,197 
25,487 
35,839 
22,960 
37,083 
63,017 
26,521 



s30,219 
32,939 
33,711 
32,674 
34,667 
35,718 
42,063 
55,710 
56,381 
61,435 
59,566 



8512 
542 
624 
213 



18 



$389,431 

402,092t 

425, 165 

443,978 

451,143 

471,993 

529,062 

*559,328 

*757,679 

*878,153 

*889,877 



t $92.50 included for rental of church for schoolhouse purposes in Ward 7. 

* Includes $882.50, rent of Armory, in 1919. 

* " 750.00, " , in 1920. 

* " 350.00, " . in 1921 

* " 250.00, " . in 1922. 



Table 5. — Annual Cost Per Capita of Maintaining Schools. 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



[Based on the average membership. 



" 










1 


Ratio of 




Instruction 


School 


Janitors, 




Assessors' 


Cost of 


Year. 


and 


Supply 


Heat and 


Total. 


Valuation 


School Main- 




Supervision. 


Expenses. 


Light. 




of City. 


tenance to 
Valuation. 


1912 


$23 61 


$2 12 


$3 99 


$29 72 


$69,632,540 


$ .00556 


1913 


24 54 


1 91 


4 18 


30 63 


71,848,811 


.00559 


1914 


24 55 


1 89 


4 27 


30 71 


74,887,800 


.00568 


1915 


24 90 


2 03 


3 92 


30 85 


77,153,500 


.00575 


1916 


26 25 


1 88 


4 41 


32 54 


79,304,329 


.00569 


1917 


26 72 


2 05 


4 61 


33 38 


78,921,472 


.00595 


1918 


29 58 


2 40 


6 09 


38 07 


84,639,280 


.00625 


1919 


31 82 


2 45 


« 43 


40 70 


87,353,424 


.00643 


1920 


44 34 


2 80 


7 45 


54 59 


83,910,855 


.00903 


1921 


50 07 


1 60 


9 62 


61 29 


86,718,290 


.01012 


1922 


50 90 


2 77 


6 73 


60 40 


1 88,158,139 


.01009 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



391 



Table 6. — Amount Spent Annually for all School Purposes. 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 





For New 


For Repairs and 


For Maintaining 


Amount Spent 


"> EAR. 


Schoolhouses. 


Permanent 


Schools. 


for all 






Improvements. 
$14,163 




School Purposes 


1912 


$35,527 


$389,431 


$439,121 


1913 


34,866 


19,341 


402,092 


456,299 


1914 


120,913 


19,700 


425,165 


565,778 


1915 


9,745 


28,212 


443,978 


481,935 


1916 


81,184 


21,634 


451,143 


553,961 


1917 


94,420 


27,283 


471,993 


593,696 


1918 


100,177 


30,126 


529,062 


659,365 


1919 


104,067 


20,492 


559,328 


683,887 


1920 


200 


44,286 


757,679 


802,165 


1921 


3,285 


39,573 


878,153 


921,011 


1922 


7,576 


36,629 


889,877 


934,082 



For years prior to 1912 


see School Report of 1917. 






TABLE 7.- 


-POPULATION 


AND SCHOOL 


CENSUS. 








For School Year 1921-1922 






1842 . . 


1,013 


1901 . . 


63,000 


1913 . . 


81,000 


1850 . . 


3,540 


1902 . 


65,273 


1914 . . 


85,000 


1860 . . 


8,025 


1903 . 


. 67,500 


1915 . . 


86,854 


1865 . . 


9,366 


1905 . 


. 69,272 


1916 . . 


88,000 


1870 . . 


14,693 


1906 . 


. 70,875 


1917 . . 


90,000 


1875 . . 


21,594 


1907 . 


. 72,000 


1918 . . 


91,000 


1880 . . 


24,985 


1908 . 


. 75,500 


1919 . . 


91,500 


1885 . . 


29,992 


1909 . 


. 75,500 


1920 . . 


93,033 


1890 . 


40,117 


1910 . 


77,236 


1921 . . 


94,500 


1895 . 


. 52,200 


1911 . . 


78,000 


1922 . . 


98,000 


1900 . 


. 61,643 


1912 . 


. 80,000 







School Census 

Number of children between 5 and 15 years of age, inclusive 
April 1, 1922 . 



16,717 



School Registration. 

Number of children between 5 and 15 years of age, in- 
clusive, April 1, 1922: — 

In public schools 

In private schools 

Total 

Number of compulsory school age, 7 to 13, inclusive: — 

In public schools, males 4,337 

females 4^507 



In private schools, males 
females 



1,175 
1,221 



12,639 
3,097 

15,736 



8,844 
2,396 



Total 



11,240 



392 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Table 8. — Attendance of the Public Schools for the School Year 

1921-1922 



CD 

13 PI 
CO cc 

3 S 

2 O 
9 O 

2 °» 

O t» 


SCHOOIiS. 


_ Pi 

pi « 

pi s 
Pi o 

«s 


p. 

f-t QJ 


Average 
Attendance. 


Per cent, of 
Attendance. 


bo 

6 a 


No. Attending 
in June. 


pi 

rjl 
l*> Pi 

OS O 

°co 
6 


72 


High 


2037 
686 

1084 
715 

1058 
340 
511 
512 
217 
413 
254 
588 
198 
629 
697 
210 
704 
704 
474 
333 
183 
345 
409 
337 
847 
157 
388 
50 
1 
144 
269 


1916 
634 
994 
672 

1013 
288 
474 
472 
199 
388 
191 
525 
183 
565 
634 
187 
655 
609 
446 
311 
172 
322 
377 
321 
784 
145 
355 
46 
7 
119 
105 


1774 
588 
930 
633 
963 
264 
436 
443 
189 
365 
180 
490 
170 
521 
591 
. 177 
611 
648 
416 
291 
162 
299 
353 
306 
731 
136 
329 
42 
6 
116 
141 


92.5 
93.0 
93.5 
94.1 
94.8 
91.0 
92.0 
93.8 
95.0 
94.0 
94.1 
93.3 
93.0 
92.2 
93.2 
94.5 
93.2 
93.9 
94.2 
93.8 
94.3 
92.7 
93.6 
95.3 
93.2 
93.8 
92.6 
91.3 
93.5 
97.3 
75.3 


1978 
650 

1023 
691 

1021 
306 
482 
497 
188 
388 
192 
537 
187 
575 
635 
185 
616 
653 
397 
308 
177 
330 
382 
319 
748 
150 
357 
46 


1877 
615 
938 
660 
982 
273 
465 
461 
203 
385 
196 
527 
165 
553 
643 
188 
663 
633 
449 
313 
168 
316 
372 
319 
771 
141 
359 
46 
7 
104 
105 


176 


19 

26 

22 

31 

5 


Eastern Jr . High 

Southern Jr. High 

Northern Jr. High 

Western Jr. High 

Prescott 


175 
174 
176 
175 
174 


10 


Hanscom 


175 


11 


Ben nett 


174 


6 


Baxter 


174 


10 


Knapp 


174 


5 


Perrv 


174 


12 


Pope 


174 


4 


Cummings 


175 


12 


Edfferly 


175 


14 


Glines 


174 


4 


Forster 


175 


16 


Bingham 


175 


15 


Carr 


174 


11 


Morse 


175 


7 


Proctor 


175 


4 


Durell 


174 


8 


Burns 


175 


10 


Brown 


174 


8 


Highland 


174 


20 


Cutler 


174 


4 

8 


Lincoln ^ 

Lowe 


175 
174 


o 
o 

1 


Atypical 


175 


Sight Saving 


9 


2 


Boys' Vocational 

Continuation 


126 
115 


182 
180 








380 


Total 


15,494 


14,109 
13,686 


13,301 


94.2 


14,259 


13,897 










875 


Total for 1920-21 


14,772 


12,760 


93.2 


13,607 


13,163 











SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



393 



Table 9. — Statistics of High School for School Year September 14, 1921 

to June 22, 1922 



Number of teachers, including head master . . 72 


Number of days school kept .... . 176 


Number enrolled 






2037 


Average number belonging . 






1916 


Average daily attendance 






1774 


Tardinesses .... 






4879 


Dismissals .... 






566 


In Class 1924, September 






822 


June 






752 


Per cent, of loss 






8.5 


In Class 1923, September 






536 


June 






492 


Per cent, of loss 






8.2 


In Class 1922, September 






637 


June 






618 


Per cent, of loss 


. 




2.9 


Special students, September . 






12 


June 






15 


Per cent, of gain 






25 


Total, September 






2007 


June 






1877 


Per cent, of loss 






6.5 


Number of graduates, male . 






227 


Number of graduates, female 






387 


Total .... 






614 


Average age, male graduates 






18 yrs. 1 mo. 


Average age, female graduates . 






18 yrs. 2 mos. 


Number entering college 






83 


Number of graduates entering scientific schools . 52 


Number of graduates entering normal schools . . 34 


Cost of instruction $137,088 15 


Cost of supplies 

Total cost 


12,514 04 


$149,602 19 


Per capita cost of instruction 71 54 


Per capita cost of supplies .... . 6 53 


Total cost per capita 






78 07 



A 



AXNTAL RETORTS. 



Table 10. — Pupils by Grades. June. 1922 





- 


Teachers. 




Pfpils. 








Hen. 


Women. 


■ 


z 


= 


Never in 


SCHOOL- 


- 
r - 

E 
PC 


i 

- 

z 

< 


First 
Before. 


H-.yr. 


Special.. 

Twelfth _ 




::::::::: 





6 

-•• 


24* 
414 


















Tenth 














Total 














'-- 




- j 


i . .yv 


:.-" 






Ninth 












4- 
567 


-:>4 
607 


1,174 




Junior High 


KigMh 






















Total 












16 


rS 


1 




"_ .»- ~ 


:• . - 'r : 








Fifth 






6. 


34 

33 

'- 
31 
36 
37 




■-■:. 
617 

822 


666 

642 
650 
773 
729 


1.325 

:.::-: 

1.267 
1,551 




Element arv 








Fourth 











Third- 

Second 

First 

Total 

Special 











1 










1 


4.071 


4.127 


vlV- 




Kindergarten 


4 

— 


8 
3 


6 


: r - 


:-.; 


344 






n 


> 


21 






?. i - - 

Boys" Vocational— 
Independent 
Household . 

Continuation 

Sight Saving 






■ 


;- 

104 


19 


46 
KM 






1 
2 

1 










3 




40 

4 


65 
3 


105 
7 












<Trand Total 


* 


-^ 


8 




7,102 


'.: -" 











SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



395 



Table 11. — Pupils in High, Junior High, Elementary, Vocational, and 
Continuation Schools, 1921-1922. 





High 
School. 


Junior 
High 

Schools. 


Elementary 
Schools. 


Kinder- 
gartens . 


Vocational 

School 

for Boys. 


■S'o 

G O 

<jco 


Sight 
Saving Olar-s 


Continuation 
Schools 


o 


Annual enrollment 


2037 
1916 
1774 
92.5 

4879 

566 

1978 

1877 


3543 
3313 
3114 
94.0 
2277 
1017 
3385 
3195 
8 


9076 
8268 
7810 
94.5 
4449 
1894 
8411 
8219 
68 


374 
335 
298 
80.9 


144 

119 

116 

97.3 

15 

16 

126 

104 


50 

46 

42 

91.3 


1 

7 

6 

93.5 


269 
105 
141 
75.3 


15,494 


Average membership .. 


14.109 


Average attendance 


13,301 


Per cent, of attendance 


94.3 


Number cases of tardiness 


11,620 


Number cases of dismissal 








3,493 


Membership. October, 1921 


198 
344 


46 
7 




115 
105 


14,259 


Membership, June, 1922 

No. cases corp. punishment 


7 


13,897 
76 



Table 12. — Number of Pupils Admitted to Grade 1 In September. 



School 



Prescott 

Hanscom 

Bennett 

Baxter 

Knapp 

Perry 

Pope 

Cummings 

Edgerly 

Glines 

Forster 

Bingham 

Carr 

Morse 

Proctor 

Durell 

Burns 

Brown 

Cutler 

Lincoln , 

Lowe 

Total i 

I 



.1918 



46 
114 
67 
31 
30 
42 
55 
35 
43 
86 
21 
65 
79 
82 
48 
28 
65 
63 
136 
60 
82 



1,278 



1919 



32 
153 
104 
34 
53 
38 
50 
47 
43 
92 
25 
86 
75 
69 
43 
34 
83 
76 
86 
42 
74 



1,339 



1920 



66 
126 
96 
34 
47 
40 
71 
47 
54 
110 
31 
95 
81 
78 
36 
30 
77 
72 
116 
32 
72 



1,411 



1921 



78 
78 

117 
26 
74 
37 

' 79 
48 
53 
79 
25 
91 
74 
69 
42 
37 
58 
72 

168 
32 
79 



1,416 



396 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 13. — Eighth Grade Promotions — Junior High Schools — June, 

1922 



Promotion from the eighth grade to the ninth grade in the 
Junior High School corresponds to the promotion from the 
last grade of a grammar school to the High School. 





m 


o 


33 


ua 

O 

O 

o 


O 


-o 


o 


ther 
chools 




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W 55 

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o 

O 




Is 




Elite 

nior ] 

City 




P 

£; 


?P 


6 


1° 


o 
Is 


o 

Is 


l= 


6-3 fl 


Eastern Junior High School... 


210 


203 


191 


3 


2 


Q 

o 


3 


1 


Southern Junior High School- 


321 


316 


266 


9 


27 


12 


1 


1 


Northern Junior High School 


206 


183 


162 


11 


3 


3 


2 


2 


Western Junior High School .. 


342 


326 


304 


10 


9 


2 




1 


Total 


1079 


1028 


923 


33 


41 


20 


6 


5 



Table 13a. — Ninth Grade Promotions — Junior High Schools — June, 

1922 

Promotion from the ninth grade to the tenth is the promo- 
tion from the Junior High School to the Senior High School. 
The tenth grade corresponds to the second year of a four year 
High School. 



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Eastern Junior High 


2 


24 


2 


Southern ' ' 


293 
201 
325 

1006 


276 
193 
306 

946 


231 
165 
275 


5 

9 

13 


16 
14 
12 

44 


24 
5 

6 

59 




Northern " 




Western " 








Total 


808 


33 


2 



1921 


1922 


Change 


442 


354 


—88 


1,347 


781 


—566 


1,459 


884 


—575 



255 


—24 


198 


—29 


46 


+ 11 


11 


—6 


61 


—11 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 397 

Table 14. — Comparative Statistics of the Attendance Department for 
the School Year 1921 — 1922 



Number of visits to the schools 

Number of visits to the homes 

Number of cases investigated 

Number of cases found to be truan- 
cy or absenteeism .... 362 341 — 21 

Number of different pupils who 
were truants or habitual absen- 
tees 279 

Number who were truants for the 

first time 227 

Number who were truants for the 

second time 35 

Number who were truants for 

three or more times ... 17 

Number of girls who were truants 

or absentees 72 

Number of cases of parental 
neglect of children found and re- 
ported to charitable institutions 1 

Number of cases of removal of 
children from the custody of 
parents by order of the court . 1 

Number of visits to mercantile or 

manufacturing establishments . 43 

Number of minors found to be 
working without employment 
certificates ..... 59 

Number of employment certificates 

issued to boys .... 200 

Number of employment certificates 

reissued to boys .... 92 

Number of employment certificates 

issued to girls .... 162 

Number of employment certificates 

reissued to girls .... 48 

Number of educational literate cer- 
tificates issued to minors over 16 
years of age (first issue) . . 883 1,247 +364 

Number of newspaper licenses is- 
sued to boys 12 to 16 years 
of age 

Number of transfer cards investi- 
gated 

Number of truants in the County 
Training school at the close of 

the year 

Amount paid for board of truants 



1 





46 


+ 3 


46 


—13 


229 


+29 


156 


+ 64 


152 


—10 


86 


+ 38 



111 


95 


—16 


1,954 


1,299 


—655 


10 

$1,004.15 


9 

$908.14 


— 1 

—$96.01 



398 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 14. — (Concluded). — Comparative Statistics of the Attendance 
Department for the School Year 1921-1922 



Disposition of truancy and habitual absentee cases 
Warned and returned to school 
Transferred to other schools . 
Obtained certificates (14 to 16 years) 
Left school (over 16 years) 
Removed from city .... 
Brought before court and returned to school 
Brought before court and sent to Training School . 
Returned to Training School (violating parole) 
Parents brought before court for keeping children out of 

school (convicted) 

Sent to Lyman School 

Sent to Shirley 

Sent to Home For Little Wanderers .... 



146 
12 
31 

8 
34 

8 

7 
1 

1 

7 
1 
1 

257 



Table 14-a. — Truancies and Habitual Absenteeism by Ages and Grades. 













BY AGES. 












Grades. 






















Total. 




















16 or 






6 7 


8 


9 


10 


n 


12 


13 


14 


15 


Over 




I 


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1 
















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4 


5 


1 














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2 

1 


4 
1 


3 

2 
6 


5 
3 

7 


7 


2 
4 


1 

2 
5 


2 


1 


15 


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11 


V I 




32 


VI i 










1 


8 


15 


12 


11 


1 


48 


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2 


3 


20 


23 


17 


3 


68 


VIII 














4 


11 


7 


2 


24 


IX 


















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9 


5 


21 


X 




















2 




2 


XI 


























XII 


























Boys' Voc'l 


















3 






3 


Ungraded.. 










1 




2 




3 




6 


Total 2 9 


10 


11 


12 


19 


18 


47 


64 


51 


1.2 


255 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



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fuel, lieht, etc 


a 

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400 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 15-A. — Evening High School — Season 1921-1922, 





Male Female 


Total 




289 282 


571 


. 


161 186 


347 


. 


111 129 


240 


. 


17 






58 






$4,737 00 




light, 


1,323 57 





Enrolled .... 

Average membership . 
Average attendance 

Number of teachers 
Number of sessions 
Cost of Instruction 

• Cost of janitor, fuel, light, 
and supplies . 

Total cost . . . $6,060 57 

Cost per pupil per evening . 301 

Average attendance: October, 309; November, 289; December, 235; 
January, 249; February, 181; March, 191. 



Table 15-B — Evening Elementary Schools— Season of 1921-1922. 



Enrolled 

Average membership . 
Average Attendance . 
Number of teachers 
Number of sessions 

Cost of instruction 
Cost of janitor, fuel, light, 
and supplies . 

Total Cost 
Cost per pupil per evening . 



Male Female 


Total 


122 38 


165 


70 26 


96 


56 21 


77 


2 4 


& 


77 




$1,911 00 




795 95 




$2,706 95 




366 





Table 15-C — Evening Vocational Classes— Season 1921-1922. 



Enrolled .... 
Average Membership 
Average Attendance . 

Number of teachers . 
Number of sessions . 
Cost of instruction 
Cost of janitors, fuel, and light, and 
supplies 



Total expenditure 
Income from sources other than local tax 

ation 

Net expenditure . 

Reimbursement from State 

Net cost .... 

Net cost per pupil per eve. 



Men 


Women. 




77 


229 




58 


171 




48 


139 




4 


10 




40 


39 


$1,070 


75 


$1,149 00 


387 


26 


254 90 


$1,458 


01 


$1,403 90 


141 


07 


255 28 


$1,306 


94 


$1,148 62 


596 


90 


574 31 


$710 


04 


$574 31 


306 


086 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



401 



Table 16. — Promotions from Elementary to Junior High School*. 





1919 1920 ! 1921 


: 

1922 


Knapp. 


62 107 83 


91 

91 


Perrv. 


34 32 39 








Pope. 


139 127 136 129 

i 


Edgerly. 


136 171 171 168 


Glines. 


88 83 ] 94 91 

1 1 1 


Forster. 


35 31 29 35 


Bingham. 


66 j 66 95 87 


Carr. 


106 96 113 142 


Morse. 


46 61 43 68 


Proctor. 


44 59 44 


53 


Brown. 


43 70 43 j 69 


I 
Highland. 143 178 155 161 


Cutler. 


1 
126 120 115 154 


Total. 


1068 1201 1160 1248 


Average 
Membership 
of Elementary 
Schools. 


8345 8334 8270 8268 


Per cent, 
of Average 
Membership 
Promoted 


12.79 14.41 | 14.03 


15.09 



402 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 17. — Attendance Statistics. 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 















Ratio of 






Average 


Average 


Per cent, of 


Number of 


Tardiness 


June 


Enrollment 


Membership 


Attendance 


Attendance 


Tardi- 
nesses 


to Average 
Attendance 


1912 


13,272 


11,710 


11,083 


94.6 


6,307 


0.569 


1913 


13,491 


11,903 


11,216 


94.2 


7,354 


0.655 


1914 


13,932 


12,320 


11,610 


94.2 


7,380 


0.635 


1915 


14,505 


12,903 


12,189 


94.5 


8,000 


0.656 


1916 


14,647 


13,191 


12,323 


93.4 


9,373 


0.761 


1917 


13,967 


12,770 


11,933 


93.7 


7,325 


0.613 


1918 


14,256 


12,656 


11,798 


93.2 


8,970 


0.760 


1919 


14,039 


12,733 


11,609 


91.2 


9,744 


0.839 


1920 


14,091 


12,836 


11,807 


91.9 


11,628 


0.993 


1921 


14,500 


13,396 


12,533 


93.6 


11,337 


0.904 


1922 


15,225 


14,004 


13,160 


94.0 


11,620 


0.883 



Table 18. — Membership, Etc., of High School. 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Year. 


Average 
Membership 
all Schools. 


Largest 
Number in 
High School. 


Per cent, of 

Average 

Membership 

of all 

Schools. 


Number of 
Graduates of 
High School. 


Per cent, of 

Average 

Membership 

of all 

Schools. 


1912 


11,710 


2,023 


17.28 


296 


2.53 


1913 


11,903 


2,081 


17.48 


296 


2.48 


1914 


11,610 


2,111 


18.18 


273 


2.35 


1915 


12,903 


2,258 


17.50 


311 


2.41 


1916 


13,191 


2,288 


17.35 


348 


2.64 


1917 


12,770 


1,973 


15.45 


340 


2.66 


1918 


12,656 


1,520 


12.01 


332 


2.62 


1919 


12,733 


1.854 


14.56 


310 


2.43 


1920 


12,836 


1,714 


13.35 


241 


1.87 


1921 


13,396 


1,762 


13.15 


316 


2.36 


1922 


14,004 


2,037 


14.55 


613 


4.38 



For yearo prior to 1912 see School Report of 1917. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



403 



Table 19. — Promotions for School Year Ending June 22, 1922. 
Junior High Schools. 



Gkadk. 


On June 
omotion List 


conditionally 
romoted 1o 
slext Grade 


Promoted 
on Trial 


CO 

CD 


as 

o P 


o ^ 
Hi? 

O bo 

J* pi 
Pm-S 

Fh 

ft fl 


Promotees 
ropped Back 
after Two 
onths' Trial 




Ph 


P 






i- 1 «3 

P-IX3 


Q S 


I 


1,157 


959 


114 


84 




1 


1 


II 


1,078 


888 


131 


59 






4 


III 


996 


918 


28 


50 






1 


Total 


3,231 


2,705 


273 


193 




1 


6 



Percentage of Promotions for School Year Ending June 22, 1922. 

Junior High Schools. 





S o 


tionally 
ted to 
irade 


oted 
rial 


•a 

CU 
T3 


;d more 
Grade 


2 <u 

o bo 

^ Pi 


otees 
d Back 
Two 
' Trial 


Grade. 


On Ji 
Promoti 


Uneondi 
Promo 
Next ( 


Prom 
onT 


Reta 


o rt 

0H.H 
+2 


^5 




I 


100 


82.9 


9.9 


7.2 




0.008 


0.008 


II 


100 


82.4 


12.1 


5.5 






0.03 


III 


100 


92.2 


2.8 


5.0 






0.01 




100 


85.8 


8.3 


5.9 




0.008 


0.01 



404 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 19-A. — Promotions for School Year Ending June 22, 1922. 

Elementary Grades. 



Grade. 


une 
m List. 


tionally 

oted 

Grade. 


"3 

C 
o 

7D 






Promo- 
ting Year. 


tees 
Back 
hree 
Trial. 




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C 


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Oi o 


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P *" 


Pu 


X 


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53 


Q S 


I 


1,593 


1,253 


88 


246 


6 


5 


4 


II 


1,492 


1,245 


111 


116 


20 


11 


6 


III 


1,285 


1,093 


108 


67 


17 


13 


2 


IV 


1,288 


1,102 


109 


70 


7 


9 


4 


V 


1,341 


1,078 


171 


87 


5 


6 


4 


VI 


1,309 


1,117 


131 


53 


8 


8 


4 


Total 


8,308 


6,888 


718 


639 


63 


52 


24 



Percentage of Promotions for School Year Ending June 22, 1922. 

Elementary Grades. 




SCHOOL DEPARTMENT, 



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ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 22. — Leave of Absence of Teachers 

Sarah E. Murphy, from March 1 to the end of the school year. 

June 30, 1922 
Berta M. Burnett, for school year ending June 30, 1923 
M. Edna Merrill, for school year ending June 30, 1923 
Edith L. Hurd, for school year ending June 30, 1923 



Cadets. 



Barbara E. Brainard 
M. Helen Campbell 
Margaret Burke 
Mildred Dewire 



Mildred M. Harkins 
Alice M. McFarland 
Eleanor D. Nemser 
Mary E. O'Shaughnessy 



Ida Paly 
Hazel L. Smith 
Gladys M. H. Sullivan 



Table 23. — Transfers of Teachers. 

Teacher From 



Helen B. Ryan 
Rena S. Hezelton 
Clara B. Donlon 
L/illias T. Lawton 
Eleanor W. Nolan 
Nettie L. Fay 
Amy P. Woodbury 
Walter P. Sweet 



Eastern Junior High 

Southern Junior High 

Knapp 

Non-English Speaking Class 

Bennett 

Bennett 

Bennett 

Northern Junior 



To 



Senior High 
Senior High 
Eastern Jr. High 
Western Jr. High 
Edgerly 
Proctor 

Sight Saving Class 
Western Jr. 



Table 24. — Number of Teachers. 



FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Year. 



1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 

1991 

1922 



High 

School 



66J 
68t 
75T 
76t 
77* 
70J 
70J 
70° 
69° 
75° 
72J 



Junior 

High 

Schools. 



65 
108 
106 
113 
115 
114 



Elemen- 
tary 
Schools. 



252* 
257* 
266* 
272* 
290* 
238* 
207* 
207* 
212* 
216t 
2161 



Special 
Teach- 
ers. 



Assistants 
not in 

Charge of 
Room. 



22 
28 
30 
31 
30 
33 
28 
26 
23 
25 
22 



9 

12 

20 

15 

15 

17 

5 

9 

8 

14 

16 



1=1 

O 

o 


a 

< 





































5 
5 


2 
2 



Men. 



40 
39 
44 
45 
46 
49 
49 
48 
54 
60 
57 



^Including a secretary. *Including four kindergartners. 

tlncluding seven kindergartners. 
olncluding a secretary and a matron 



Women 



309 
326 
347 
349 
366 
374 
369 
370 
371 
392 
390 



Total. 



349 
365 
391 
394 
412 
423 
418 
418 
425 
452 
447 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 409 

Table 25.— Books Authorized for Use, 1922. 

For High and Junior High schools, — 
As Text Books, — 

Household Arithmetic, Ball and West— J. B. Ldppincott Co. 

Elements of Latin, D'Ooge — Ginn & Co. 

Second Course in Algebra, Hawkes, Luby, Touton — Ginn & Co. 

The Book of Modern Verse, British and American, Forbes — 

Henry Holt & Co. 
Scientific Typewriting, Depew — Allyn & Bacon 

For High School, — 
As Text Books, — 

Selections from Ovid, Kelsey and Scudder — Allyn & Bacon 

For Junior High schools, — 
As Text Books, — 

Junior High school Mathematics, Three-Book Series, Vosburgh 

and Gentleman — Macmillan Co. 
Vital English, Book 2, Taylor-Morss — F. M. Ambrose Co. 
The Junior Song and Chorus Book, Giddings and Newton — Ginn 

& Co. 

For Elementary Schools, — 
As Text Books, — 

Aldine Speller, Parts One, Two, Three, and Manual for Teachers, 
Bryce and Sherman — Newson & Co. 

Eleanor Smith Music Course, Book I — American Book Co. 
As Supplementary Readers, — 

A Day in a Colonial Home, Prescott — Marshall Jones Co. 
For Evening High School, — 

As Text Books, — 

The Business Man's English, Bartholomew and Hurlburt — Macmil- 
lan Co. 

Table 26— HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION 

The graduation exercises of the High School occurred 
Thursday, June 15, 1922. 

ORDER OF EXERCISES 

HERBERT CHOLERTON, Chairman of the School 
Committee, Presiding. 

1. OVERTURE— "Sarabande" Bohm 

High School Orchestra, Lawrence L. Daggett, Leader 

2. SINGING— 

"And the Glory of the Lord" (Messiah) Handel 

Graduating Class 

3. PRAYER— Rev. William H. Dyas 

Pastor, Grace Baptist Church 

4. SINGING— "The Lost Chord" Sullivan 

Boys' Chorus 



410 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

ORDER OF EXERCISES 
Continued. 

5. ADDRESS TO GRADUATES 

Hon. Charming H. Cox 
Governor cf Massachusetts 

6. SINGING— "The Miller's Wooing" Faning 

Graduating Class 

7. PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS TO GIRLS 

8. "VALSE LENTE" Coerne 

Orchestra 

9. PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS TO BOYS 

10. POSTLUDE— "Marche Lorraine" Ganne 

Orchestra 

Singing and orchestra under the direction of James P. McVey, 
Supervisor of Music in the Public Schools 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



411 



SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 
LIST OF GRADUATES 

June, 1922 
♦Graduated with honor. 



Lois Augusta Abells 
Isabel Josephine Ahern 
Hilda Margaret Aikins 
Elizabeth Jean Allen 
Mary Christina Andersen 
Ruth Evelyn Anderson 
Lillian Andrews 
Elizabeth Merie Armstrong 

♦Elizabeth Carter Ashton 
Edith Sara Babino 
Aileen Elizabeth Backus 

♦Iva Rogers Baker 
Mary Carmelita Barden 
Goldie Emma Barton 
Mary Agnes Beaver 
Eleanor Beedle 
Florence Josephine Bellizia 

♦Angelina Berman 
Bessie Anna Berrnan 

*Elsie Bertelsen 
Rena Ersilla Bertucci 
Helen Beatrice Bingham 
Irene Albena Birchdale 
Alice Lucinda Blake 
Irene Evelyn Borges 

♦Mildred Louise Bradshaw 
Helen Claire Bratton 
Ethel Catherine Brennan 
Gladys Mills Briggs 
Ida Bronstein 
Mary Bryson Brown 
Olive Agnes Buckley 
Esther Burke 
Florence Edna Crowe 
Mary Esther Crowley 
Leila Alice Cuneo 

♦Helen Cunningham 
Mabel Elizabeth Cutler 
Ruth Alchorn Cutler 

♦Marie Burnett Damery 
Natalie Davis 
Emily Atkins Day 
Mildred Viola Dearborn 
Olivia Mae Dearborn 
Doris Mary Delany 
Mary Beulah DeMita 
Frances Emma Dempsey 
Mary Antonia Deslnond 
Marion Lucille DeW iU 
Mary Lenore Diamond 



Gladys Edna Dick 
Irene Elizabeth Dingwell 

♦Marian Louise Dodge 
Mary Edwina Doheney 
Helen Nora Dolan 

♦Margaret Anna Donahue 
Helen Theresa Donovan 
Alice Elizabeth Doris 
Jane Ann Doyle 
Ruth Marie Drew 
Rosamond Lillian Duffey 
Marguerite Catherine Duffy 
Alice Wentworth Dunlap 
Gwendolyn Dunn 
Ethel Louise Dunne 
Marion Gertrude Dunning 
Ellen Inez Durgin 
Edna Frances Durning 
Ruth Dyas 
Doris Marjorie Edgar 
Edna Mae Edgerly 
Mildred Esther Burleigh 
Rachel Evangeline Burns 
Hazel May Burton 
Isabelle Beatrice Caldemni 
Irene Marie Callahan 

♦Ada Anna Calzolari 
Doris Dillingham Cameron 
Marion Anna Cannon 
Edith Putnam Carleton 
Alice Violet Carlson 
Eleanor Brown Casey 
Evelyn Marie Casey 
Jennie Manle Casey 
Frances Josephine Catanzano 
Marion Louise Chapin 
Florence Louise ClarK. 

♦Frances Clark 
Anna Marie Clifford 
Veneta Maud Clouther 
Ruth Eleanor Coakley 
Margaret Bernadette Coleman 
Bertina Morona Congdon 
Elizabeth Mae Conley 
Marguerite Connolly 
Bertha Margaret Connor 
Lauretta Agnes Connors 
Dorothy May Conrad 
Anna Luella Cook 
Esther Mary Corcoran 



412 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Dorothy Helen Cowan 

Catherine Gertrude Coyne 

Dorothea Crosby 

Paula Quintard Crosby 

Sarah Ellison 

Edith Emery 

Grace Teske Engelhard t 

Doris Louise Engiund 

Marion Gladys Erb 

Elsie Louise Estabrook 

Irma Celeste Farrington 

Doris May Ferguson 

Janet Alexander Field 

Frances Anne Filippone 

Eva Fishlin 

Loretto Anita Flanagan 

Maude Waddell Flanagan 

Lillian Florence Flinn 

Anna Margaret Flynn 

Grace Frances Fogarty 

Mary Eva Fontana 

Olive Whitney Frazee 

Laura May Freeman 

Gladys French 
♦Mildred Ever French 

Grace Howard Fuller 

Ina May Gassett 

Eleanor Packer Geer 

Apolline Gelinas 
*Lois Pearl Gibson 

Annie Gilman 

Hazel Davis Gilmore 

Arline Girard 
*Dorothy Stockwell Glazier 

Marion Winona Goff 

Dorothy Gordon 

Dorothy Gordon 

Marion Eva Gore 

Orrie Belle Grant 

Honora Marie Grattan 

June Augusta Gray 

Adelaide Greene 

Louise Jeanette Gullion 
♦Mildred Edith Gunning 

Natalie Cecile Hail wood 

Muriel Gladys Hale 

Helen Elizabeth Hamilton 

Florence Gilmore Hanna 

Josephine Louise Harer 
♦Edith May Harmon 

Helen Gertrude Hatchett 

Nora Louise Havican 

Paula Dorothy Heald 

Katherine Elizabeth Henchey 

Marian Juliet Hesse 

Lillian Margaret Hill 

Elsie Ruth Hill 

Alice Mary Hodgkins 



Urana Belle Hogle 
♦Olive Elizabeth Holmes 
Helen Gertrude Hoole 
Agnes Marcella Home 
Helen Jane Howard 
Marjorie Estelie Howard 
Florence Marie Hubert 
Inez Blaisdell Hunter 
Marjorie Alice Hurford 
Ruth Marie Hurwitz 
Doris Marie Irwin 
Mildred Josephine Ivaska 
Lillian Frances Jaques 
Axelina Victoria Johanson 
Genevieve Elizabeth Johnson 
Irene Elizabeth Johnson 
Ruth Miriam Johnson 
Dorothy Andrews Jones 
Edith Hamilton Jones 
Thelma Anna Jones 
Haru Alice Kamemori 
Victoria Ann Kavooghian 
Florence Olive MacFadyen 
Lois Evelyn MacFadyen 
Catherine MacKenzie 
Laura. Ruth MacKenzie 
Josephine Elizabeth MacLellan 
Mildred Louise MacPhee 
Anna Matilda Magnusson 
Ruth Jessie Matilda Main 
Mary Louise Malvey 
Bernice Anastatia Manley 
Helen Catharine Marshall 
Elinor Pendleton Martin 
Helen Winifred Martin 
Lydia Clementina Marvin 
Ida Dorothy Mauch 
Kathleen Comey McCabe 
Mary Agnes McCann 
Edith Marie McCarthy 
Theresa Anna McCarthy 
Myrtle May McCloud 
Dorothy Beryl McConnell 
Helen Elizabeth McDermott 
Gertrude Louise McGlinchy 
Florence Elizabeth McGoldrick 
Margaret Regina McGoldrick 
Alice Loretta McGrath 
Margaret Louise McKenna 
Muriel Marie McKinnon 
Mary Electa McLain 
Mary Rose McLaughlin 
♦Barbara Cushing McLoud 
Mary Agnes McNamara 
♦Margaret Mary McSweeney 
Katherine Columba Meskill 
Alice Sanborn Meyer 
Mary Harriette Milano 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



413 



Anna Frances Miller 
♦Isabel Marie Miller 
♦Magdaline Louise Miller 
Anna Emeline Keating 
Roma Blanche Keddy 
Helen Margaret Keefe 
Mildred Warner Keith 
Catherine Constance Kelleher 
Josephine Agatha Kelly 
*Ruth Anna Kelter 
Dorothy Carolyn Kennedy 
Grace Edith Kennedy 
Marie Elizabeth Kenney 
Marie Patricia Kenney 
Lillian Kerner 
Annie Irena Kimball 
Mary Cecilia King 
Adelaide Wheater Kinney 
Elsie Lovering Knox 
Kathryn Marcella Knox 
Dorothea Winnifred Kopf 
Carolyn Ambrose Kyte 
Leah Murrita Lally 
Angelina Anna Lamborghini 
Helen Agnes Lane 
Edith Elvira Larsson 
Ruth Elizabeth Leavitt 
Hanna Lebovich 
Grace Dorothy Lee 
Bertha Mary Lewis 
♦Helen Catherine Lewis 
Mary Louise Lewis 
Helena Rich Lincoln 
♦Helen Louise Linderholm 
Ella Margaret Linehan 
Marion Pearl Linfield 
Edith Regina W. Lofgren 
Alice Gertrude Lombard 
♦Alice Lynd 
Mary Frances Lyon 
Marion Louise Lyons 
♦Mildred Louise Milliken 
Myrtle Irene Minzner 
Sarah Esther Moody 
Doris Valentine Moore 
♦Edith Constance Moore 
Edith Louise Moore 
Eleanor Mae Moore 
Kathryn Hazel Morgan 
Kathryn Marie Motherway 
Gladys Lillian Murley 
Alice Margaret Murphy 
Frances Hazel Murphy 
Frances Margaret Murphy 
Lucy Elizabeth Murphy 
♦Margaret Florence Murray 
Anna Gertrude Naiman 
Lilian Veronica Nangle 



Sat". ye Betty Neeclel 
Ina Genevieve Nevins 
Elizabeth Ann Newton 
♦Mildred Eleanor Nickerson 
Irene Caroline Nilson 
Eleanor Mae Ninde 
Agnes Margaret Norton 
♦Elvira Frances Notaro 
Mary Patricia O'Brien 
Catherine Rose O'Lalor 
Anna Theresa O'Leary 
Helen Gertrude O'Laughlin 
Evelyn Smith Osgood 
Mary Lillian Palmer 
Bernice Frances Parker 
♦Marjorie Weston Parker 
Genevieve Howard Peak 
Esther Louise Peakes 
♦Vera Lucille Pearson 
Josephine PenDell 
Mary Elizabeth Pendleton 
Lila Gladys Perry 
Ethel Estelle Phillips 
Gertrude Clara Phillips 
Marion Arline Phillips 
♦Mildred Alice Pickernell 
Elizabeth Brown Pike 
Inez Vivian Plummer 
♦Margaret Mary Pomphrett 
Agnes Mildred Powell 
Irene Emma Powell 
Margaret Teresa Powers 
Frances Beatrice Preble 
Helen Melba Price 
♦Alice Whittemore Pride 
Dorothy Frances Purnell 
Hazel Mae Ralston 
Anne Claire Reardon 
Ethel Rosamond Ricker 
Martha Kingsbury Risdon 
Marjorie Lorettor Robinson 
Helen Frances Rodwell 
Julia Agnes Ronan 
Mary Olive Rood 
Jennette Rouft'a 
Margaret Eileen Rush 
Alice Charlotte Russell 
Madeline Dorothy Ryan 
Margaret Honora Ryan 
Lucia Mendall Ryder 
Mary Louise Sadlier 
Nellie Catherine Sadlier 
Elsie Esther Sandberg 
Olive Dorothy Savary 
Mary Alice Scanlan 
Agnes Lyell Schutte 
Esther DeLyon Scott 
Olive Sears 



414 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Mary Alice Sliney 
Edith Hazel Small 
Katherine Mary Smith 
Ruth Smith 

♦Arline Snow 

*Georgiana Spencer 
Fanny Spivack 
Dorothy May Sprague 
Mabel Christine Starck 
Evelyn Gage Stern 

*Heien Frances Stevens 
Edena Leoia Strout 
Anna Veronica Sullivan 

*Frances Elizabeth Symonds 
Edith Taylor 

Florence Mary A. Terozowski 
Grace Louise Thompson 
Anastasia Thornton 

*Marion Evelyn Todd 
Gertrude Helena Tracey 
Marjorie Mae Trask 
Ruth Greenwell Truesdale 
Evelyn Agnes Turnbull 
Virginia Emery Twitchell 
Sada May Tyler 
Olive Mitchell Upton 
Edna May Walker 
Ethel Gladys Walker 
Catherine Ann Walsh 
Harriet Holmes Walton 
Dorothy Mae Weeks 
Ruth Weinberger 
Gladys May Wellington 
Doris Hulda Westiund 
Mildred Louise Westiund 
Annie Agnes Whalen 
Vera Hawthorne Whitman 
Corinne Ray Wiggin 
Catherine Elizabeth Wiggins 
Florence Wilbur 

^Florence Evelyn Wilkins 
Dorothy Williams 
Gladys Edna Williams 
Regina Donalene Wilson 
Lillian Emma Witham 
Emily Rebecca Wright 
Mary Blmyra Yavner 
Eleanor May Youlden 
Anna Christine Young- 
Doris Rose Young 
Florence Ednah Young 
Florence Elizabeth Young 
Lilla Marion Young 
Louise Augusta Young 
Kathleen Vernetta Zwicker 
Henry Hall Adams 
Paul Flanders Albertini 
Wallace Bruce Alexander 



Bernard Allen 

*George Edward Apel 
Leo Aronson 

Alexander Joseph Austin, Jr. 
Edward John Bacigaiupo 
Samuel Backer 
Bernard LeRoy Bacon 
Chester Thomas Bell 
James Perkins Bird 
Frederick James Blacker 
Maurice Bloom 
John Joseph Bloomer 

*Walter Nelson Breckenridge 
Leonard Chandler Breen 
John Aloysius Brennan 
Joseph Thomas Brennan 
William Robert Bryans 
Edward Buchinsky 
Robert Farrell Buckley 
Chandler Harding Burckes 
Joseph John Caldarone 
Charles Anthony Campbell 
William Joseph Canniff 
Carl Henry Carlson 
Clarence Wilhe'm Carlson 
Kenneth William Chase 
Herbert Randolph Clark 
James Joseph Cole 
Chester Daniel Connell 
Charles Brewster Conwell 
John Elliott Cox 
Theodore Russell Coyle 
Frank James Crandell 
Ernest Milton Crocker 
William Joseph Crotty 
Archie Warren Crouse 
Daniel Crowley 
Reynold Arthur Currier 
William Clarke Custer 

*Lawrence Luce Daggett 
Marshall Sanger Danforth 
Charles Gordon Daniels 
Charles James Davidson 
Alfred Joseph DePadua 
Russell Kilbourne Dewar 
Arland Augustus Dirlam 
Joseph DiSilva 
Harold Robert Dixon 
Leonard Fitch Dodge 

*Alfred Howland Dolben 
John Edward Doris 
Francis Joseph Downey 
Herbert Arthur Dresser 
John Martin Dunleavey 
Charles Thomas Durgin 

*Alvin Lloyd Earle 
Edwin Earle 
Walter Crocker Ellis 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



415 



John Henry Ellison 

Ralph Webster Ells 

Albert Chambers Emerson 

Edward Albert Falvey 

Joseph Lawrence Fannon 

James Sinnett Farr 

James Edward Ferris 

Lawrence Edward A. Finnegan 

Sanford Fisher 

John Joseph Flynn 
♦Albert Gardner Forbes 

George Leon Forest 

Chester Sullivan Francis 
♦Harold Perley Freeman 

Malcolm Reid Fuller 

Richard Kane Gannon 

William Henry Gilliatt 

Israel Goldstein 

Walter Hill Gonia 

Whitman Garton Goodwin 

Gostan Gostanian 

Hugh Haliday Graham 

Ernest Allison Grant 

Donald Curtis Grinnell 

Kenneth Frederick 'Grinnell 

Joseph Laurence Grue 

Russell Benjamin Grush 

Edward Richardson Hakesley 

Otis Henry Hanslick 

Foster Graves Hardin 

Charles Crockett Harding, Jr. 

Murray Brown Hart 

John William Hassett 

Alf More Hedberg 

William Phelan Heffernan 

Carlton Seavey Hicks 

Lincoln dishing Higgins 

Carroll Scott Hill 

Stephen Joseph Hopkins 

Alfred William Hurwitz 

John Philip Jackson 

Vano John Johnson 

Peter Johnston 

James Henry Keane 

James Everett Keely 

Wentworth Kennard 

Joseph Kernzkoski 

Melvin Crowe King 

Elmir Lewis Littlefield 

Sanford Litwin 

George Alexander Macdonald 

Robert Bruce MacPhail 

Joseph John Manning 

Alvin Clifton Marchant 

James Lawrence Marmaud 

Edwin Lindsay Marston 

Edward Albert Martin 

♦Willard Edgar Martin, Jr. 



Wlnthrop Reynolds Martin 
Norman Albert Matheson 
Justin David McCarthy 
Paul Leonard McCarthy 
William Timothy McCarthy 
Charles Francis McElroy 
Donald Charles McGilvray 
Joseph Thomas C. McGlone 
Robert Edward McKelvey 
Stephen Joseph Meaney 
Maurice Mekkelsen 
Clinton Everett Miner 
John Stuart Morris 
David William Morse 
Romeo Joseph Mucci 
Ralph William Murley 

*Harold Joseph Murphy 
John Christopher Murphy 
Charles Gerry Nichols 
Edmund Thomas Norris 
George Edward Novack 
Carl Bracy Nowell 
Maurice Joseph O'Brien 

*Henry Joseph O'Connell, Jr. 
James O'Connell 

♦Bernard Vincent O'Connor 
John Joseph O'Connor 
Nishan O'Hanian 
Jeremiah Leonard O'Neill 
John Joseph O'Neill 
Joseph Leo Owens 
Paul Eastman Parker 
Charles Chandler Parkhurst 
Carroll Otto Peacor 
Hilding Richard Pearson 
Leslie Joseph Peters 
Henry Woodman Phillips 
Albert Elliot Pillsbury 
Clifford Francis Pitts 
Herbert Everett Pollack 
James William Powers 
Ronald Channing Prescott 
Herman Price 
Joseph Benedict Purtell 
Harold Charles Quail 
James William Quigley 
Robert David Rauh 
Richard Peabody Reavis 
Harry Edward Rice, Jr. 
Gerald Ring 
Morris Roberts 
Benjamin Robert Robinson 
Charles Robinson 
Walter Vincent Robinson 
Lemuel James Rogers 
Augustus Charles Roman! 
Merritt Knowlton Ross 
Homer Austin Rowe 



416 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Francis Edward Runey 
Carl Evert Sahlin 
Ernest William Sandstrom 
Joseph Arthur Scully 

♦Robert Austin Shea 
Alfred Elton Sibley 
Louis Siegel 

Frederick Burge Simmons 
Edwin Warren Spear 
Edward Francis Spering, Jr. 
Herbert Bailey Sprague 
Arthur Edward Stack 
Irving Leo Stackpole 
Wilbur Gardiner Stanley 

♦Robert Nichols Stevens 
James Salisbury Stewart 
Williston Finlay Stodder 
Roy Alfred Strobeck 
George Alvin Strom 
Daniel Francis Sullivan 
Arthur Sigvard Swenson 
Robert Warren Sylvester 
Henry Allen Tadgell 
Charles Stuart Tarbell 
Thomas Joseph Tarpey 



Martin Harry Tashjian 
Charles Baird Teague 
Alvin Roy Ticehurst 
Samuel Tick 

♦Frank Martin Towle 
Joseph John Tremblay 
Donald Byron Tribe 
Francis Lynwood Tribou 
Aldus Stone Trowbridge 
Warren Tutein 
Raymond Henry Wallace 

♦Arthur Edward Watkins, Jr. 
Irving Dearborn Wells 
Irving George Wessmah 
Chester Glover Whyte 
Stuart Allan Wickerson 
Austin Horatio Wilkins 
Malcolm Clement Wilkins 
Daniel Francis Williams 
Ernest Herbert Wilson 
Kenneth Ingersoll Wilson 
Richard Trenholm Wilson 
Kenneth John Wolf 
Arthur Wellington Wood worth 
Levon Mardrois Yacubian 



Total number of graduates, 613; Boys, 227; Girls, 386. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



417 



Junior High School graduations occurred in the school 
buildings on June 20, 1922. 

LIST OF GRADUATES 



Marguerite B. Abbott 

Edith Craig Allison 

John E. Amlaw 

Leroy A. Anderson 

Helen May Arnold 

Mildred Allan Ayers 

Robert H. Arnold 

Alberta R. Babcock 

Ciscely 0. Barnes 

John A. Bel.amacina 

Haskell C. Billings 

Eleanor Teasdale Binford 

Christine Agnes Black 

Vera G. Blakeney 

John Blanche 

Edward Blumsack 

Emma Malverne Boardman 

Josephine Bonanno 

Geraldine M. Bowen 

Frederick W. Brown 

John Joseph Brady 

Clifton R. Campbell 

Harris OR. Bullerwell 

Marvin 0. Campbell 

Mary Agnes Burns 
Jennie Pauline Canniff 
Mabel Louise Chapman 
Mary Susie Capobianco 
Brooks E. Carpenter 
Joseph Albert Chartrand 
Ruth Emily Chambers 
Earl Clouse 

John Lawrence Collins 
Joseph P. Collins 
John L. Connolly 
George William Cook 
James Edward Cotter 
Ruth Annazetta Covert 
Henry Francis Cox 
John Joseph Cox 
Margaret L. Cremins 
Frederick W. Crimins 
Albert F. Daley 
Lillian M. Dacey 
Maud Annie A. Daley 
Roger Lawrence DaPraio 
Esther Elizaoeth Davit; 
Harry Dickson 
Ruth R. Dickson 
Evelyn Dill 



Eastern. 

Walter W. Dunn 

Mary A. Durant 

Ruth Elizabeth Farrell 

Charles Feink 

Ella W. Fisher 

Louis Fisher 

Alice B. Fitzgerald 

James W. Flanagan 

Catherine C. Ford 

Hilda E. Forsyth 

Catherine Josephine Fortune 

Mary Veronica Fraser 

James Joseph Galvm, Jr. 

Eleanor May Gay 

Alberta Getchell 

Philomena Mary Gianettis 

Gerald M. Gipple 

Edmund Francis Giroux 

Celia Goldstein 

Esther Helena Gostanian 

Louise Elizabeth Goulette 

Clara Helen Gray 

Minnie Greenberg 

C. Lester Gregor 

Mina U. Haas 

William Hanlon 

Alice May Hamilton 

Sarah E. Harrington 

Walter M. Harrington 

Daniel F. Henchey 

Sarah Theodora Holmes 

Winthrop C. Horton 

Vivian May Hunnewell 

Evelyn Marion Hutchinson 

George J. Ingalls 

Mary E. Jackson 

Frances Eleanor Johnson 

Gertrude Alexandria Johnson 

Joanna E. Johnson 

Evelyn M. Kinch 

Harold A. Kirkness 

Dorothy Edith Knox 

Jacob Kowetz 

Angelina Louise Langone 

Roscoe C. Larkin 

Teresa M. LaTerza 

Myra A. Lawson 

Edwin F. Leary 

Francis Leo Leary 

Harry Lebovich 



418 



ANNUAL RETORTS 



Elsie K. Leslie 
Dorothy Alice Lee 
Howard A. Lincoln 
Alice Margaret Legere 
Helen Rose Linnehan 
John A. Lowney 
Margaret Frances Lynch 
Alfred J. Lyons 
Margaret R. McGahan 
Roland O. MacNuge 
Katherine Agnes McGrath 
Walter L. McKillop 
Arthur P. McMahon 
John Thomas Mahoney 
Isabel A. McMullen 
Alma E. Maxfield 
Christopher Leo Manley 
Grace K. Manning 
Ralph J. Mattola 
Audrey Sargent Merrow 
Charles J. Miers 
Inez M. Milano 
Keelan S. Milbury 
Hugh J. Montague 
Thomas J. Montague 
Edmund G. Moriarty 
Herbert Morrill 
Esther Charlotte Nelson 
Sara M. Nissenbaum 
Ellen Catherine O'Donnell 
John O'Donnell 
Florence M. O'Leary 
Catherine F. O'Neil 
Thomas W. Orpen 
Delia Maron Patriquin 
Hazel M. Perry 



Ethel D. Peterson 

J. Lawrence Phalan 

Lillian Alice Porter 

Anna M. Powers 

Louis Price 

Lillian Mildred Redmond 

Francis L. Rogers 

Charlotte Dorothea Rosen 

Annie Mary Rossetta 

T. Lewis Rowe 

Helen Dorothy Royal 

Anne Rudge 

Helen Catherine Ryan 

Henry L. Ryan 

John R. Shepherd 

Adeline Marie Sanford 

Helen C. Shea 

Henry J. Skelly 

Francis Joseph Smith 

Gladys Evelyn Snow 

Stanley Stewart 

Isabelle Swarbrick 

Hazel Mae Thomson 

H. Wesley Toothaker 

Clyde M. Tuck 

Viola Irene Turner 

James Edmund Walsh 

John F. Walsh 

Lillian Corrinne Wardell 

David H. Warsowe 

Arthur Joseph Wilson 

Joseph B. Weinberger 

Helen M. White 

Rachel Young 

Joseph Vincent Zambelli 



Southern 



Grace Lillian Frances Appeltofft 

Alfred F. August 

Ruth Emily Baird 

Alfred Amerigo Baratta 

Alice M. Baratta 

Donald Lawrence Belden 

Hugo George Anthony Bellengi 

Esther Berger ' 

Dante E. Bertolami 

George Russell Beyer 

Josephine M. Biagione 

Dorothy Margaret Bigelow 

Evelyne M. Blake 

Robert Francis Bloomer 

Alfred C. Brennan 

Albert Francis Bryant, Jr. 

Daniel J. J. Buckley 

Edward George Buckley 

Frances Burgess 



Joseph Burke 

Frank Xavier Calandrella 

Frank Xavier Joseph Calandrelia 

Cornelius Richard Callahan 

Angelo J. Capone 

Robert James Cardillo 

Julia Agnes Carey 

Joseph Paul Carr 

Dominic Carra 

Ralph Sewell Carvill 

John R. Casey 

Mary Elizabeth Cashman 

Frances Lillian Chandler 

Maude Leone Chandler 

fluido Ciapponi 

William Charles Clancy 

Alice Louise Clark 

Leslie M. Cleaves 

.\orman H. Clements 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



419 



Leona Mae Clifford 
Anna Marie Collins 
"timothy B. Collins 
Thelma Withrow Col well 
Edward W. Conboy 
Evelyn Dorothy Condon 
Harold Franklin Cooke 
James Joseph Corcoran 
J. Leslie Corrigan 
Thomas W. Cosgrove 
Eugene Leo Courtney 
Marie Paule L. Couturier 
James Patrick Curtin 
Warren Joseph Curtin 
Frank Peter Dagnino 
John F. Dardis 
Irene M. DeBay 
Celia Rose Dempsey 
Mary Edith Desmoni 
Antonio Joseph DiGirolamo 
Alice Jennie Dinelli 
Leo Christopher Donahue 
John Joseph Donahue 
James F. Donegan 
Francis X. Donnelly 
William J. Donovan 
Anastasia C. Drinan 
Francis Leo Driscoli 
Francis Joseph Duffy 
Edward Edwards, .Jr. 
Thurston H. Edwards 
Arthur W. Eklof 
Theodora Anna Eldredge 
John Joseph Enos 
Gunhikl A. Erlandson 
Ivan E. Fales 
Mary Fecas 

Margaret Agnes Feeley 
Rose Veronica Feeley 
Roy Joseph Ferretti 
Anna Fishlin 
Eileen A. Foley 
Mary B. Forrest 
Stanley H. Foskett 
Myrtle Viola Fralick 
Albert William Francis Fuchs 
Obelina Helen Gallant 
Mary Theresa Gately 
John Gaudet 
Irene Gilliatt 
Annette Dorothy Glaze r 
Frances Goldenberg 
Sadie Lillian Goldstein 
William Gardiner Goss 
Mario Govoni 
Harlan F. Grant 
Evelyn Phyllis Grant 
George R. Greene 



John Arthur Grieneeks 
Thomas Alexander Griffin 
Charles V. Grue 
Alice E. Guazzaloca 
Thomas William Guilderson 
Mabel June Gunning 
Marie Adelaide Harney 
Gertrude Viola Havican 
Emily F. Haviland 
Ashley C. Hedberg 
James Francis Hogan 
Alice L. Holland 
Hazel Agnes Holland 
Mary Helen Holloran 
John Wilfred Holmes 
Carl C. Howard 
Joseph R. Howard 
Edith Caroline Howell 
E. Ruth Howell 
Albert Edward Irving 
Helen Josephine Joyce 
Joseph M. Kelleher 
William Joseph Kelleher 
George Francis Kelley 
Charles F. Kelly 
Thomas Joseph Kennedy, Jr. 
Catherine Constance Kenney 
George J. Kerrigan 
Anna Elizabeth Kiley 
Nino 0. Killam 
John Kingston 
Fannie Mary Klayman 
Thomas A. Koen 
Louis Kratman 
William Kratman 
Richard George John Landini 
Josephine Catherine Lanigan 
James Joseph Leahy 
Jessie Margaret Leahy 
Margaret V. Lee 
George A. Lenzi 
Ruth E. Lerman 
Diulinda L. Linhares 
Florence Louise Lloyd 
James Carter MacDonald 
Ida MacDougall 
Orpha MacFadyen 
Elizabeth Agnes Maclver 
Isabella Leslie MacKenzie 
Sara Adaline Magwood 
Francis A. Malsbenden 
Antonio Mancini 
Francesca Mannino 
Edgar Arthur Marble 
Edith Mary Marvin 
Albert F. McAuTiffe 
Kathryn A. McAuley 
George Thomas McAvoy 



420 



ANNUAL- REPORTS 



Mary E. McAvoy 
Edna Myrtle McCarthy 
Mary Edna McCully 
Hugh McCusker 
Mary Veronica McDermott 
Katherine Eleanor McGann 
Margaret V. McKay 
Charles Hugh McKinnon 
Mary McNamara 
Winifred R. McNamara 
John Francis McSweeney 
Claire McTiernan 
Earle Howe Melville 
Robert Arthur Mercer 
Josephine A. Mercia 
Louisa D. Meyer 
Olive Beatrice Miller 
James D. Mohan 
Albert W. Molan 
Marguerite M. Mollet 
Charlotte Louise Moody 
Margaret M. Morgan 
Jeannie Elizabeth Morrison 
Thomas Redmond Francis Mullins 
Walter H. Munroe 
James Francis Murphy 
John J. Murphy 
Gerald J. Murphy 
Helene Elizabeth Murphy 
H. Joseph Murphy 
Henry F. Murphy 
Loretta H. Murray 
Lillian Z. Naiman 
George Neville 
Cornelius Francis Noonan 
Thomas P. Noone 
James J. O'Brien 
Patrick F. O'Brien 
Edith E. O'Connor 
Joseph A. O'Connor 
Helen Mary O'Malley 
Lillian May O'Neil 
Henry C. Panzer 
Aaron Franklin Parsons 
Clarabelle Payne 
William John Peebalg 
Mary E. Pendergast 
William James Pero 
Lally Pirani 
John L. Perkins 
May C. Perron 
Mary Perry 

Charles Francis Pollard 
Frances Ellen Pomphrett 
Margaret Rosemary Puppo 
Daniel Joseph Purtell 
Cornelius Francis Quinlan 
William Joseph Quinlan 



Anne Virginia Quinn 

Lillian A. Ranaghan 

Arthur L. Reidy 

Edith Aileene Ring 

Agnes Rita Roche 

Dorothy Ada Ross 

John Rossetti 

Joseph Vincenzo Ruccio 

Philip Lowry Rusden 

Ronald Francis Russell 

George McKenna Ryan 

Guy Joseph Salani 

Osgood William Lorimer Sargeant 

Constance Beatrice Sargent 

Sarkis Sarkesian 

Ronald W. Savage 

Julia Rose Savani 

Bernard William Savilonis 

Mabel Irene Sawyer 

Francis Vincent Scanlan 

William M. Scanlon 

Mary Ruth Schofield 

Helen C. Sherman 

Rosalyne Silbert 

William David Sliney 

John Robert Smith 

Blanche Gertrude Spooner 

Ruth Evelyn Sprague 

Lilly Marie Stromme 

Edmund M. Stymeist 

Agnes Julia Sullivan 

Porter Eugene Swan 

Martin John Tashjian 

Fortunata J. Testa 

Mary T. Thomas 

Edna Louise Thompson 

Ella Virginia Thornton 

Harold Nesbitt Thornton 

George Edward Toomey 

Eric Arthur Trask 

Gertrude Mary Travers 

Alice Jeannette Underwood 

George Roger Van Iderstine 

Florence E. Van Ummersen 

Frank X. Veneri 

Lillian E. Vergnani 

Matthew M. Vitiello 

Cecilia Viveiros 

Helen Louise Vorce 

Harold James Wallace 

Mildred Watts 

Charles E. Weeden 

Walter W T ardwell Weeden 

John J. Whealen 

Edna May White 

Muriel Gertrude Wilcox 

Laura Gertrude Williams 

Belvin Franklin Williston 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



421 



Leslie Franklin Winchenbaugh, Jr. Bertha M. Wood 
Helen Gladys Winchester Edith Winifred Wood 

Edward Lowell Wisewell, Jr. Lucy Mary Zammarchi 



Northern 



George William Alexander 
Albert Amadei 

Wendell Frederick Anderson 
Dorothy Aronson 
Ida Mary Bagni 
Henry C. Barr 
Elizabeth Frances Bean 
Sylvia Emlee Bellizia 
Henry William Bergin 
George William Bielis 
Arthur Michael Bo 1 and 
Vivian Frances Bond 
Kathrynn F. Badford 
Marjorie Brown 
Ruth Evelyn Brown 
Irene Frances Bullock 
Edith Catharine Burke 

Francis Edward Burke 
Tasia Sara Caffanges 
Muriel Gladys Callow 
Robert Harold Cammick 
Ina E. Cannon 
Arthur Carlson 
Katherine Belle Carter 
Roy Martin Cheney 
Gladys Arlene Coe 
Joseph Coit 
Evelyn Mary Coit 
Chester Harold Colburn 
Cornelius Corcoran 
Lillian M. B. Corrieri 
George Vincent Cox 
Clarence Charles Crocker 

Marjorie Cross 
Nora Mae Crowley 
Doris A. Cummings 
Louise Dalio 
Jane C. Day 
Dorothy A. Delouchery 
Gabriel Harry Del Rossi 
Elizabeth F. Dennehy 
Frederick E. Dodge 
James Joseph Doherty 
Lovina Eleanor Donegan 
Mary Louise Donovan 
Emily Catherine Dugan 
Mary Eleanor Duggan 
William Douglas Ekstrom 
Arthur Faberman 
Ruth Geraldine Farrar 
Thelma Jewel Ferguson 
Gordon Hubert Field 



Anthony Filippone 
Josephine Arelia Finneran, 

Ruth M. Finnin 
Esther Marion Fisher 
Chester Gordon Fitzgerald 
Warren Joseph Foley 
Howard W. Foss 
Virginia L. Foss 
Hazelle Foster 
Anna Mary Friel 
Guy E. Gage 
John H. Gage 
Rosemary Gallagher 
Primo S. Galleni 
Helen Beatrice Galvin 
John A. Garland 
Rena Evelyn Gattoni 
Mary J. Gaudette 
Myron C. Gerrish 
Charles Patrick Gillespie 
Marion Christina Givan 
Ethel Lillian Gonia 
Eileen Margaret Goode 
Leo Joseph Gormley 
Kenneth R. Graham 
Ruth M. Graham 
Alton Perley Greene 
Ruth Greenleaf 
George William Griffis 
Elizabeth Hall 
Elizabeth Jeanette Hall 
Erwyn Henry Harriman 
Josephine M. Heafey 
George Joseph Hebert 
Catherine G. Heiser 
Helen Beatrice Henchey 
Robert Arnold Hight 
Austin Winchester Holmes 
Dorothy Martha Holmes 
Christena Irvine Hunter 
John W. Irving 
John Johnston 
Helen Eleanor Johnson 
Frank Leon Jones 
Melbourne Ralph Jones 
James G. Kane 
William J. Kane 
James Arthur Keefe 
John Joseph Keefe 
Norman E. Keene 
Arthur N. Kelliher 
Natalie Bonsalle King 



422 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Margaret Emily Kingston 
Sara Louise Kinneen 
Marion Lamb Knight 
Annie R. Krant 
Gertrude Annabell Lamb 
Concetta Frances Lauro 
Jennie Dorothea Lauro 
Franklin R. Leavitt 
Alice Lees 
Gertrude Levine 
Ruth Alalia Libby 
Frances Marion Lilly 
Etta Dorothy Lima 
Michael James Lodico 
Laurence Edward Lovering 
Fenton Matthew Lyons 
Flora Mary MacQuarrie 
Edmund Joseph Mahony 
Beatrice Ethelyn Mann 

Mary V. Marotta 
Charles George Martignetti 
Frank Achille Martignette 
Anna Teresa Martin 
William Massello 
Kathleen R. McAteer 
Margaret Mary McCarthy 
Mildred McCarthy 
Ruth McCarthy 
Catherine McCormack 
Mary J. McKane 
Daniel K. McKinnon 
Mary Velma McKinnon 
Ellen T. McSweeney 
Anna C. Meaney 
Louis Mellor 
Gertrude Elise Millett 
Anna V. Mocogni 

Mary Elizabeth Morrissey 
Elaine Ruby Morse 
James Francis Mulligan 
Evelyn Mary Murphy 
Gertrude Gwendolyn Murphy 
William John Newton 
Mildred Alice Nugent 
Geraldine F. O'Brien 
William F. O'Donnell 
Anna E. O'Lalor 
Doris May Osborne 
William H. Parker, Jr. 



• Winifred Jean Pember 
Frances Louise Phillips 
Viola Bernice Phillips 
Alfred Edward Plude 
Harry Marshall Prescott 
Ernest Richard Priebe 
Ira A. Prime 
John Edward Pynn 
Burgess Parker Reed 
James Luther Reid 
William Francis Repetto 
Margaret Mary Reppucci 
Mildred C. Rideout 
Albertina Rose Rigali 
June Marie Rogers 
Florence Rose 
Sara Mayvilla Ruffino 
Harry G. Russell 
Frank Russo 
Alice Rose Ryan 
Everett J. A. Ryan 
Ruth M. Sanderson 
Ruth Dearborn Schofield 
Edson Vinton Sears 
Margaret Elizabeth Shea 
Raymond James Shea 
Ruth E. Slotnick 
William Elliott Small 
Helen G. Smith 
Catherine Florence Sonia 
Lillian Rita Sousa 
Edith Gertrude Sykes 
Raymond L. Taylor 

Jean M. Thomson 
Grace Eloise Thornton 
John Henry Tomfohrde 
Adelia Belle Voss 
Mary Gertrude Walsh 
Helen Hay Wattie 
Ruth Catherine Wattie 
Esther Preble Way 
Mabel M. Westlund 
George Steuart Whitcomb 

Mabel Moulton Wnite 
Henry Ambrose Williamson 
Floris H. Woolner 
Nelson Wright 
Gladys P. Young 



Western 



Charles Q. Adams 
Regis Margaret Ahern 
Dorcas M. Ames 
Charles Theodore Anderson 
Ruth Elizabeth Anderson 
Phyllis Ardelle Applin 



Louisa Yolanda Arzillo 
Mildred Claire Atkinson 
Mary Elizabeth Attridge 
Violette C. Babcock 
Archie G. Barron 
John Francis Bartlett 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



423 



Evelyn N. Bassett 
Hazel May Bearce 
Phyllis W. Beatty 
Francis Leonard Beaver 
Dorothy E. Bedighian 
Forrest Theodore Benton, Jr. 
Evelyn Marie Berry 
Vera Elizabeth Berry 
George Herbert Birtwell 
John Blamire 
Doris H. Booth 
Mabel Frances Bond 
Beatrice L. Boudreau 
Gretchen A. Bowers 
L. Raymond Bowlby 
Mabel C. Breen 
Paul Larkin Broderick 
Alice H. Brooks 
Philip Thomas Buchert 
Florence Louise Burk 
Harry G. Burnett 
Anna M. Burns 
Marion Lovell Burrell 
Frances Catherine Burton 
Clara Phyllis Butterfield 
George Chester Byam 
Albert Francis Byrnes 
Earl Francis Cahalan 
Elena Calamara 
Mary K. Callahan 
Thelma G. Calkin 
Blanche Mae Canavan 
Margaret Ellen Canney 
Bertha Marie Carlson 
Erma Muriel Carman 
Joseph Francis Carnes 
Lucile E. Carpenter 
Phyllis F. Capodanno 

Louis [William CMcarello 
Helena S. Chittenden 
Edward Wallace Clark 
W. Lewis Clark 
Muriel Helen Clark 
Ruth Alma Clements 
Frances M. Coates 
Gertrude Elizabeth Condon 
Robert P. Coffey 
Isabelle M. Colletti 
Chester James Collins 
Emma Copithorne 
Alfred John Corbett 
David Gordon Crockett 
Ainslie M. Crooks 
Margaret Crowley 
Irene Y. Cummings 

Gladys L. Danforth 
Elmer Norman Daniels 
George S. Dawson 



Harvey P. Davis 
Frances Marie Decost 
Doris Derusha 
Viola May Dibblee 
Gertrude Anna Dinan 
Wendell Joseph Dion 
Ralph Gilbert Ditmars 
James Robert Dobson 
Warren Hughs Dolben 
Agnes Mary Donahue 
James Arthur Donovan 
Helen Gertrude Doucet 
Louise Agnes Downes 
Eleanor B. Drew 
Milton Haggett Duclos 
Thomas Bartlett Dudley 
Grace Louise Dunning 
Joseph L. Dwyer 
Elisabeth Dorothea Easton 
Margaret Eggleston 
Eleanor Etta Ellis 
Frank Mason Elwell 
Doris Emery 
Muriel Estes 
Helen L. Farnam 
Hazel Felt 
Charles Joseph Finn 
Charles Albert Finney 
Eleanor M. Flemming 
Walter H. Flett 
Ernest Henry Flint 
Margaret Frances Ford 
Winnifred Marie Ford 
Mary Elizabeth Foster 
Shirley T. Foster 
Florence Alice Fowler 
Donald Lamprey Fraser 
Dorothy Evelyn Freeman 
Vernon B. Fuller 
Sherwood Edward Fuller 
Grace Frances Gaffney 
Russell E. Gaskill 
Dorothy Geraghty 
William Joseph Goguen 
Jeanette Goodman 
Charles Andrew Goodwin 
Curtis Edmond Goodwin 
Dorothy Grant 
Grace Janet Grant 

Hugo Alexandar Greco 
Leslie Hammond Griffin 
Elizabeth S. J. Gurney 
Theodore Denteth Hale 
Frederick H. Hanna 
Eleanor Harmon 
Frederick Tapley Hawes 
Dorothea M. Hayes 

Katihryn Elder Heater 



424 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Hope Laurence Heiser 
Gladys Wilhelmina Herderhurst 
Eugene Edmund Heriihy 
Lawrence Stewart Hesse 
Vera Hiilberg 
Edith H. Hilton 
Margaret Holden 
Thomas J. Home 
Doris Houghton 
Daniel P. Hurley 
Ruth Agnes Hussey 
Clarence Frazer Ingalls 
Arthur H. Jacobsen 
Frances Elizabeth Jardine 
Gertrude Martha Jaycock 
Charles E. Jellison 
Edmund I. Jellison 
Anna Lucy Jodice 
Arshaloos Johnian 
Estelle May Jones 
Harold F. Jones 
William R. Keeley 
A. Aileen Keith 
Eleanor Marie Kelliher 
Mary Agnes Kelley 
Walter Coe Kelley 
James Lewis Kenney 
Beatrice Minerva Kenny 
Edward Kehew, Jr. 
Pauline King 
Walter King 
Leah F. Kingman 
Francis A. Kingston 
Charles H. KoechMng 
Dorothy Johnson Lane 
John B. Latoraca 
Nora Theresa Lawless 
Mildred A. Leslie 
Tobias Levinson 
Adele Levy 
James W. Libby 
Gracie Naomi Lingley 
Evangeline Lippincott 
Veda Elizabeth Lohnes 
Elsa H. Lundstrom 
Blanche M. Lord 
Arthur T. Luedtke 
Edward James MacClane 
Lloyd MacGillivray 
Donald A. MacKay 
Esther Graham MacKenzie 
Annie C. MacKinnon 
Mary Gertrude Maguire 
Alice Marguerite Malcolm 
Charles Frederick Manning 
Elizabeth Muriel Martin 
Freda Kathleen Mathews 
Elinore Lyon Mattern 



Albert Henry May 
Lawrence J. McCahey 
Honry Joseph McCarthy 
James Edward McGowan 
William Alfred McGray 
Katherine Leslie McKown 
Russell W. McKinley 
Ainslee L. McPhail 
Edith C. McPhail 
Leo M. McSweeney 
Hilton F. Mears 
Harry L. Meltzer 
Alice S. Melville 
Zoraida Meyrelles 
Stanley Forsyth Miller 
Mabelle G. Mitchell 
Margaret Eleanor Moran 
Irving F. Moulton, Jr. 
Aram K. Movsessian 
Inga Ellenore Muchere 
John Francis Murley 
Catherine Rita Murphy 
Lillian Elizabeth Murray 
Stanley F. Murray 
Esther Irene Newcombe 
Edith Catherine Newell 
Philip Aldrich Newton 
Elsa Evelyn Nilson 
Carl A. O'Gren 
Astrid Viola Olson 
Dorothy O'Neill 
Helen Mary Ormond 
William C. Osborn 
Albert William Owens 
Albert James Oxenham 
Eleanor Packard 
John Campbell Patterson, Jr. 
Evelyn Elizabeth Payne 
Howard W. Pearce 
Emily Grace Pearson 
Alice Elizabeth Pearson 
Priscilla L. Pennock 
Gladys Virginia Perkins 
Russell Harding Perry 
Frederick Irving Peters 
Elizabeth Louise Peterson 
Isabel H. Pickard 
Adelaide Amanda Pierce 
Ronald W. Porter 
Leonard E. Preble 
Robert Stanley Pride 
Donald T. Pring 
E. Everett Proudfoot 
John Joseph Quinn 
Thelma Rawding 
Charles L. Reed 
George Artemas Reed 
Dorothy Elizabeth Reilly 



SCHOOL DEPART M BNT. 



425 



Donald L. Remick 
Edmund John Repetto 
Warren Elsworth Rich 
Ethel May Rideout 
Alvin A. Robinson 
Samuel H. Robinson 
Winnifred Mae Roy 
Evelyn Gertrude Saunders 
Louise M. Scannell 
Chester H. Scoyne, Jr. 
Raymond W. Searle 
Dallas Lillian Seavey 
Elizabeth Marie Seckendorf 
Ruth Virginia Seckendorf 
Joshua Seidman 
Marjorie Seymour 
Hester Marie Shaw 
Anna Connell Sheridan 
Frederick O. Sime 
Frances Elizabeth Simpson 
Melvina Allan Smillie 
Frank Pellman Smith 
Gertrude May Smith 
Lawrence B. Smith 
Marguerite Pamelia Smith 
Walter C. Smith 
Warren Daniels Smith 
Stanley Fitzson Snell 
Mildred B. J. Soderberg 
John Edward Stafford 
Beulah Carolyn Staples 
Ethel Anna Starck 



Blanche Sterling 
Bartlett H. Stoodley 
Gladys Munroe Surles 
John Sussenberger 
Dean C. Swan, Jr. 

John Louis Taapken 
Arthur William Thibault 
Theodore A. Throensen 
Ellen Margaret Thyne 
George Joseph Tracey 
George William Trask 

Marie G. Vladica 
Vera L. Wakefield 
Herbert Joseph Wallace 
Richard Carter Warren 
Hazel M. Waugh 
Eileen Agnes Whall 
Ethel M. White 
Ellen Marjorie Whitman 
Ruth Evangeline Whitmore 
Harriet Gilrie Whittemore 
Alice Ola Whittier 
Annie H. Wolfe 
Alta Florence Wood 
Herbert G. Worters 
Marguerite R. Worthly 
Arthur I. Wright 
Doris Janette Young 
Edith Catherine Young 
Ella Frances Young 
Evelyn Elizabeth Zink 



426 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 27.— VOCATIONAL SCHOOL GRADUATES. 
Vocational School for Boys. 



James J. Burton 
William J. Chisholm 
Silvio J. Fuccione 
Philip L. Galley 



Arthur L. Lockhart 
William F. Lutz 
Rudolf E. Reiss 
Francis Scott Whitney 



Table 28. — Organization of School Board* 1923. 
School Committee. 



Oscak W. Codding 
Walter I. Chapman 



. Chairman 
Vice-Chairman 



Members. 

EX-OFFICIIS. 

John M. Webster, Mayor ... 

Waldo D. Phelps, President Board of Aldermen, 



Julia A. Crowley, 
Francis J. Fitzpatrick, 

Daniel H. Bradley, 
Christopher J. Muldoon, 



Charles W. Boyer, 
Oscar W. Codding, 



Katherine C Coveney, 
Edward I. Tripp, 



Harry M. Stoodley, 
Minnie S. Turner, 



Walter I. Chapman, 
Walter Frye Turner, 



Herbert Cholerton, 
Paul O. Curtis, 



ward one. 



WARD TWO. 



WARD THREE. 



WARD FOUR. 



WARD FIVE. 



WARD SIX. 



WARD SEVEN. 



76 Boston street. 
64 Flint Street. 



.34 Pinckney street. 
2 Austin street. 



19 Concord avenue. 
88 Concord avenue. 



66 Avon etreet. 
. 59 Vinal avenue. 



. 73 Marshall street 
21 Wigglesworth Street 



283 Highland avenue. 
64 Hudson street. 



18-A Central street. 
15 Highland road. 



94 College avenue. 
. 41 Mason street. 



Superintendent of Schools, 
Charles S. Clark. 

Office: City Hall Annex, Highland avenue. 

Residence: 75 Munroe street. 

The Superintendent's office will be open on school days from 8 to 5; 
Saturdays, 8 to 10. His office hour is 4 o'clock on school days, and 
8:30 on Saturdays. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 42 < 

Superintendent's office force: — 

Mary A. Clark, 42 Highland avenue. 

Mildred A. Merrill, 26 Cambria street. 

H. Madeline Kodad, 104 Sharon street, West Medford. 

Marion E. Marshall, 30 Gilman street. 

Ruth O. Elliott, 4 Uincoln Place. 

Beatrice Hersom, 142 Lowell street. 



Board Meetings. 

January 29. April 30. September 24. December 31. 

February 26. May 28. October 29. 

March 26. June 25. November 26. 

8:15 o'clock. 



Standing Committees. 

Note. — The member first named is chairman. 
District I. — Crowley, Fitzpatrick, Muldoon. 

PRESCOTT, HANSCOM, BENNETT. 

District II. — Bradley, Muldoon, Crowley. 

KNAPP, PERRY, BAXTER. 

District III. — Codding, Boyer, Bradley. 

POPE, CUMMINGS. 

District IV. — Coveney, Tripp, Boyer. 

EDGERLY, GLINES. 

District V. — Stoodley, Miss Turner, Tripp. 

FORSTER, BINGHAM, PROCTOR. 

District VI. — Turner, Chapman, Miss Turner. 

CARR, MORSE, DURELL. BURNS, BROWN. 

District VII. — Cholerton, Curtis, Turner. 

HIGHLAND, CUTLER, LINCOLN, LOWE. 

High Schools — Chairman Cholerton, Bradley, Stoodley, Crowley, 
Codding, Coveney, Chapman. 

Finance — Chairman Stoodley, Fitzpatrick, Tripp, Muldoon, Codding, 
Chapman, Cholerton, Webster, Phelps. 

Text Books and Courses of Study — Chairman Chapman, Muldoon, 
Crowley, Boyer, Coveney, Miss Turner, Curtis. 

Industrial Education — Chairman Tripp, Turner, Crowley, Muldoon, 
Boyer, Miss Turner, Curtis. 

School Accommodations — Chairman Boyer, Cholerton, Fitzpatrick, 
Bradley, Tripp, Stoodley, Turner, Webster, Phelps. 

Teachers — Chairman Miss Turner, Chapman, Fitzpatrick, Muldoon, 
Codding, Coveney, Cholerton. 

Health, Physical Training, and Athletics — Chairman Curtis, Boyer, 
Fitzpatrick, Bradley, Tripp, Miss Turner, Turner. 

Rules and Regulations — Chairman Turner, Crowley, Bradley, Cod- 
ding, Coveney, Stoodley, Curtis. 



428 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 29— TEACHERS IN SERVICE, JANUARY, 1923 

Name and Residence 

HIGH SCHOOL 

Central Hill 

John A. Avery, Head Master, 22 Dartmouth Street 
Everett W. Tuttle, Vice-Head Master, 62 Highland Avenue 
Fzank H. Wilkins, Master, 73 Foster Street, Arlington 
John L. Hayward, Master, 242 School S'creet 
Harry F. S'ears, Master, 44 Orris Street, Melrose Highlands 
William W. Obear, Master, 83 Belmont Street 
George M. Hosmer, Sub-Master, 31 Adams Street 
Laurence A. Sprague, Sub-Master, 17 Perkins St., W. Newton 2300 
Arthur N. Small, S'ub-Master, SI Avon Street 
Fred W. Carrier, Sub-Master, 14 Lloyd Street, Winchester 
Wallace S. Hall, 37 Perkins Street, West Newton 
Irving P. Colman, Sub-Master, Greenbush 
Stephen H. Mahoney, Sub-Master, 10 Oxford Street 
Albert O. Plantinga, S'ub-Master, b3 Park Street, Melrose 
George E. Pearson, Sub-Master, 325 Highland Avenue 
Forrest S. Miller, Sub<Master, 8 Hudson Street 
L. Thomas DeCelles, 46 Ware Street 
A. Marion Merrill, Sub-Master, 2 Madison Street 
Helen L. Follansbee, Sub-Master, 17 Pleasant Avenue 
Harriet E. Tueil, 17 Pleasant Avenue 
Elizabeth Campbell, 39 Greenville Street 
A. Laura Batt, 2 Madison Street 
M. Helen Teele, 11 Jason Street Arlington 
Clara A. Johnson, 177 Central Street 
Blanche S. Bradford, 163 Summer Street 
Grace E. W. Sprague, 888 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge 
Mrs. Lucy I. Topliff, 69 Cypress Street. Brookline 
Ella D. Gray, 147 Walnut Street 
Grace Gatchell, 9 Hamlet Street 

A. Marguerite Browne, 27 Everett Street, Cambridge 
*Edith L. Hurd, 125 Central Street 

Esther Parmenter, 16 Mystic Lake Drive, Arlington 
Annie C. Woodward, 2 Madison Street 
Alice A. Todd, 82 Munroe Street 
Ella W. Bowker, 2 Hillside Avenue 
Florence L. McAllister, 23 Wallace Street 
Laura R. Cunningham, 62 Highland Avenue 
Julia A. Haley, 88 Prospect Street 
Mary C. Smith, 117 Prospect Street 
Gladys L. SHvallow, 15 Pleasant Avenue 
Alfreda Veazie, 193 Linden Street, Everett 
Mrs. Phebe E. Mathews, 159 Morrison Avenue 

B. Phoebe Abbott, 67 Perrin Street, Roxbury 
Mrs. Ruth L. Card, 62 Central Street 
Ilene C. Ritchie, 15 Willoughby Street 
Ella W. Burnham, 58 Walnut Street 
Mrs. Cornelia D. Pratt, 112-A Glenwood Road 
Bernice O. Newborg, 12 Hale Avenue, Medford 
Louise M. Saunders, 1 Waterhouse Street, Cambridge 
Gertrude W. Chaffin, 10 Copeland Terrace, Maiden 





Began 


Salary Service 


$4100 


1895 


2900 


1895 


2700 


1906 


2500 


1913 


2700 


1901 


2700 


1906 


2500 


1901 


2300 


1906 


2300 


191C 


2300 


1915 


2100 


1919 


1900 


1915 


2300 


1914 


2100 


1918 


2300 


1914 


1900 


1920 


1900 


1919 


2100 


1895 


2100 


1900 


1900 


1899 


1900 


1902 


190*0 


1895 


1900 


1895 


1750 


1897 


1750 


1903 


1750 


1908 


1750 


1914 


1750 


1901 


1750 


1906 


1750 


1908 


1700 


1910 


1600 


1911 


1750 


1906 


1750 


1913 


1750 


1911 


1750 


1913 


1750 


1914 


1600 


1913 


1750 


1916 


1650 


1913 


1650 


1916 


1750 


1916 


1600 


1916 


1750 


1913 


1750 


1912 


1600 


1919 


1650 


1918 


1600 


1918 


1650 


1919 


1650 


1916 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 429 



TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1923. — Continued. 

Name and Residence. 

Mrs. Ruth L. Strand, 299 Central Avenue, Needham Heights 1600 

Elizabeth M. Welch, 3 Washing-ton Ave., Arlington Heights 

Harriet M. Bell, 62 Highland Avenue 

Dorothy E. Harvey, 61 Pennsylvania Avenue 

Margery Moore, 58 Walnut Street 

Edith M. Joel, 105 Rogers Avenue 

Harriet C. Whitaker, 75 Walnut Street 

Ruth C. MacDuffie, 30 Wadsworth Street, Allston 

Ruth E. Arrington, 37 Walnut Street 

Margaret Cochran, 34 Hancock Street, Medford 

Elizabeth I. Fury, 11 East Newton Street, Boston 

Sadie M. Lyle, 25 Lowden Avenue 

Laura W. Lewis, 44 Kidder Avenue 

Virginia M. O'Connor, 56 Parsons Street, Brighton 

Carmen Solano, 1135 Commonwealth Avenue, Allston 

Phebe R. Boole, 21 Sacramento Street, Cambridge 

Ruby F. Sutherland, 95 Central Street 

Helen B. Ryan, 35 Columbus Avenue 

Wophia C. Mague. 1766 Washington Street, Auburndale 

Rena S. Hezelton, 23 Preston Road 

Edna C. Woodbury, 202 School Street 

Mabell M. Ham, Clerk, 41 Boston Street 

tWesley A. Maynard, 40 Vinal Avenue 

Mrs. Minne T. Wyman, Matron, 71 Boston Street 





Began 


Salary Service 


s 1600 


1919 


i 1650 


1919 


1750 


1904 


1600 


1920 


1500 


1920 


1650 


1920 


1650 


1921 


1400 


1921 


1400 


1921 


1500 


1921 


1500 


1921 


1400 


1921 


1400 


1922. 


1300 


1922 


1500 


1922 


1750 


1922 


1400 


1922 


1600 


1918 


1600 


1921 


1600 


1909 


1300 


1921 


1400 


1906 


840 


191S 


1200 


1922 



* leave of absence 
t part time 



EASTERN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
Pearl Street 

Samuel A. Johnson, Master, 5 Gardner Terrace, Allston $3100 1892 

Francis J. Mahoney, Vice- Principal, 16 Parker Street 2200 1919 

Walter W. Newcombe, Sub -Master, 172 Central Street 1900 1917 

Elizabeth M. Warren, 109 Highland Avenue 1575 1897 

Sarah H. Christie, 4 Fordham Ct., Jamaica Plain 1500 1914 

Edyth M. Grimshaw, 316 Hyde Park Avenue, Jamaica Plain 1500 1909 

Pertie I. Gray, 23 Melvin Street 1500 1917 

Edith L. Laycock, 92 Summer Street, Everett 1500 1913 

Elizabeth J. Mooney, 41 Vinal Avenue 1500 1904 

Catherine L. Heagney, 32 Sewall Street 1500 1912 

Mary A. Hickey, 90 Myrtle Street 1500 191? 

Elma Isaac, 32 Richardson Street, Brighton 1450 191X 

Velma B. Strout, 36 Francesca Avenue 1500 191 R 

Mrs. Constance H. Scherer, 25 Falmouth Street, Belmont 1500 1917 

Kathinka Fessman, 1126 Boylston Street, Boston 1650 1912 

Olive E. Whittier, 4 Fordham Ct., Jamaica Plain 1500 1918 

Mrs. Amelia M. Gray, 70 Lawrence Street, Medford 1400 1920 

Adela L. Balch, 223 Mountain Avenue, Arlington 1500 1921 

Rachel M. Pratt, 114 Newbury Street, Boston 1400 1921 

Katherine Quigley, 580 Adams Street, E. Milton 1500 1921 

Lucy Dorr, 37a Central Street 1500 1919 

tBenjamin Q. Belonga, 316 Lincoln Avenue, Cliftondale 1800 1922 

Hazel L. Smith, 15 Victoria Street 600 1922 

Mrs. Clara B. Donlon, 37 Washington Street, Ayer 1500 1914 

t temporary teacher 



4oO ANNUAL REPORTS. 

TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1923. — Continued. 

Name and Residence. 

SOUTHERN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Began 
Vinal Avenue Salary Service 

George M. Wadsworth, Master, Whitman $3100 1891 

Raymond E. Sheperd, Vice-Prin'cipal, 16 Grand View Avenue 2200 1919 

Arthur E. Gordon, Sub-Master, 116 School Street 2000 191s 

Melvin T. Carver, Sub -Master, 247 Winthrop Street, Winthrop 1900 1917 

Alice L. Davis, 13 Pleasant Avenue 1650 1895 

Clara B. Sackett, 16 Madison Street 1500 1891 

Mrs. Blanche G. North, 25 Columbus Avenue 1500 1893 

Mrs. Gertrude W. Leighton, 31 Vinal Avenue 1500 1895 

Grace T. Merritt, 10 Charnwood Road 1500 1897 

Marie T. Smith -Brandt, 64 Vinal Avenue 1500 1898 

Lilla E. Mann, 17 Summit Street 1500 1902 

Mrs. Mary B. Soule, 39 Walnut Street 1500 1902 

Leila L. Rand, 184 Pleasant Street, Arlington 1500 1906 

Mrs. N- Theresa Hennessey, 15 Rock Avenue, Lynn 1500 1909 

Nona E. Blackwell, 45 Ibbetson Street 1500 1906 

Edith L. French, 52 Prescott Street 1500 1912 

Emma J. Kennedy, 15 Pleasant Avenue 1500 1912 

Maude M. Cunningham, 15 Pleasant Avenue 1500 1913 

Carrie M. Frost, 18 Grand View Avenue 1500 1920 

Charlotte A. Holmes, 24 Cambria Street 1500 1899 

Ada G. Macdonald, 43 Babcock Street, Brookline 1500 1914 

Anna J. Coll, 65 Newton Street 1500 1916 

F. Antoinette Pratt, 31 Vinal Avenue 1500 1918 

Olive M. Brownell, 62 Simpson Avenue 1500 193 9 

Ruth H. Connor, 13 Pleasant Avenue 1500 1921 

Mildred E. Blaisdell, Wamesit, Mass. 1500 1921 

Edith V. Blood, 99 Summer Street 1500 1921 

tMabel H. Eddy, 68 St. Stephens Street, Boston 1500 1922 

Beulah M. Newell, 65 Hudson Street 1200 1922 

tEleanor Campbell, 169 Highland Avenue 1200 1922 

Ida Paly, 82 Concord Avenue 600 1922 



t temporary teacher 



NORTHERN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
Sycamore Street and Evergreen Avenue 

Frank W. Seabury, Master, 18 Winslow Avenue 
Joseph S. Hawthorne, Vice-Principal, 233 School Street 
Arthur J. Marchant, Sub-Master, 60 Bartlett Street 
Mary I. Bradish, 63 Dudley Street, Medford 
Emma G. Blanchard, 146 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston 
Mrs. Mina P. Bickford, 36 Emerson Street, Medford 
Mary F. Mead, 22 Kidder Avenue 
*M. Edna Merrill, 228 Broadway 
Anna R. Walsh, 27 Avon Street 
Dorothy A. Chapin, 11 Mystic Street 
Ruth C. Harrington, 3 Moulton Avenue, Stoneham 
Mary C. Fox, 28 Linden Street 
Florence R. Gallagher, 16 Otis Street, Medford 
May B. Thompson, 120 Peterboro Street, Boston 
Minnie A. Holden, 29 Warren Avenue 
Alice M. Patterson, 108 Glenwood Road 
Mrs. Gladys M. Sheldon, 55 Liberty Street, Everett 
Annie G. Merrill, 33 Stuart Street, Everett 
Marie Clifford, 1648 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge 
Mary Donoghue, 80 Porter Road, Cambridge 
Grace M. Driscoll, 25 Arthur Street 
tMrs. Delsey Ellsworth, 34 Francesca Avenue 
tLa.ura E. Gustafson, 10 Hollis Street, Cambridge 
tBerthe DeL. Dion, 85 Broadway, Norwood 
tMargaret McLeod, 14a Ware Street 
tWilliam Colleran. 395 Highland Street, W. Newton 



$3100 


1911 


2200 


1915 


2000 


1911 


1500 


1899 


1600 


1902 


1500 


1903 


1500 


1905 


1500 


1909 


1500 


1911 


1500 


1917 


1500 


1913 


1450 


1918 


1500 


1918 


1500 


191S 


1500 


1906 


1500 


1919 


1450 


1919 


1500 


1919 


1500 


1907 


1500 


1911 


1200 


1920 


1400 


1921 


1300 


1922 


1200 


1922 


1200 


1922 


1500 


1922 



* leave of absence 
t temporary teacher 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 431 



TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1923. — Continued. 

Name and Residence. 

WESTERN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Began 
Holland Street Salary Service 

Arthur L. Doe, Master, 27 Spruce Street, Maiden $3100 1896 

Walter P. Sweet, Vice-Principal, 40 Teele Avenue 2100 1919 

John J. McLaughlin, Sub-Master, 84 Inman Street, Cambridge 2000 1916 

Ralph E. Farnsworth, Sub-Master, 43 Chelsea Street, Everett 1900 1918 

Presoott E. Whitfield, 33 Walnut Street 1600 1921 

Sarah E. Pray, 58 Liberty Avenue 1500 1877 

Clara B. Parkhurst, 146 Highland Avenue 1500 1889 

Alice S. Hall, 51 Avon Street 1500 1896 

Edith F. Hersey, 287 Medford Street 1500 1899 

Annie G. Smith, 59 Maple Street, Maiden 1500 1901 

Mary L. Bryant, 41 Mason Street 1500 1903 

Florence M. Hopkins, 288 Mass. Avenue, Arlington 1500 1907 

Elsie M. Ross, 120 Peterboro Street, Boston 1500 190S 

Katherine A. Breen, 7 Cambria Street 1500 1912 

L. Alice Grady, 19 Billings Avenue, Medford 1500 1912 

Elizabeth R. Henderson, 15'2 Curtis Street 1500 1912 

Marion F. Orne, 43 Fairmount Avenue 1500 1912 

Helen I. Steams, 106 College Avenue 1500 1916 

Mrs. Mae W. Conant, 25 Crescent Hill Ave., Arlington Hgts. 1500 1917 

Marcella M. Garri'ck, 295 Lowell Street 1450 1917 

Blanche Preston, 84 Packard Avenue 1500 1917 

Miriam E. Priest, 6 Hudson Street 1500 1917 

Mrs. Geneva C. Farnsworth, 43 Chelsea Street, Everett 1500 1917 

Jessie M. Howard, 108 Hemenway Street, Boston 1400 1919 

Helen A. Moran, 483 Medford Street 1450 1919 

Emma M. Damon, 170 Central Street 1500 1908 

Catherine E. Giles, 5 Bradley Avenue, Wellington 1500 1918 

Mrs. Augusta H. Bergin, 55 Fenwood Road, Boston 1500 1920 

Ellen L. Bellamy, 41 Bay State Avenue 1500 1921 

Helen M. Stone, 146 Curtis Street 1500 1921 

Ethel M. Park, 48 Electric Avenue 1500 1916 

E. Bella Weisman, 17a Melvin Street 1500 1921 

Mrs. Lillias T. Lawton, 136 Neponset Avenue, Dorchester 1500 1913 

Mrs. Ruth A. Maxwell, 15 Munroe Street 1300 1922 

fEthel G. Beal, 206 Washington Street, Quincy 1400 1922 

fLillian Dunlap, 98 Electric Avenue 1200 1922 

Eleanor V. Nemser, 25 Walker Street 600 1922 



f temporary teacher 



432 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1923. — Continued. 

Name and Residence. 

VOCATIONAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS (Day) 

Began 
Davis Building, Tufts Street Salary Service 

Harry L. Jones, Principal, 137 Powder House Blvd. $3300 1896 

Nehemiah E. Gillespie, SI Worcester Square, Boston 2100 1911 

Charles A. Kirpatrick. 27 Sewall Street 2000 1913 

H. Ralph Aubin, 6 Oxford Street 2100 191? 

Roy R.' King-, 18 Landers Street 1900 1918 

Phillip J. Heffernan. 356a Broadway 1900 1918 

Benjamin C. Bowman, 18 Michigan Avenue 1700 1919 

Charles A. Perry, 4 Bulfinch Place, Boston 2100 1922 

Mrs. Ethel M. Smith. Clerk, 20 Langmaid Avenue $17.50 per wk. 1921 



INDEPENDENT HOUSEHOLD ARTS SCHOOL 

High School Building 

Mary Henleigh Brown, Director, 162 Highland Avenue $2200 1911 

CONTINUATION SCHOOL 

High School Building 

Everett W. Ireland, Principal, 57 Packard Avenue $2800 192V 

Lawrence E. Landahl, 99 Summer Street 1900 1920 

Kells S. Boland, 1200 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge 1700 1920 

Estelle Crowe, 55 Cedar Street 1200 1920 

JMartha S. Walker, 80 Brookside Avenue, Newtonville 1100 1921 



% part time 



(WILLIAM H.) PRESCOTT SCHOOL 
Pearl and Myrtle Streets. 



Grade. 



Samuel A. Johnson, Master, 5 Gardner Ter., Allston 

4 Edith C. Polechio, 450 Moody S»treet, Waltham 

4:3 Mrs. Hazel S. Ashman, 42 Bay State Avenue 

3 Elizabeth L. Marvin, 17 Summit Street 

2 Louise E. Pratt, 11 Prospect Hill Avenue 

2 Mrs. Grace E. Allen, 107 Pennsylvania Avenue 

1 Jeannette M. Hannabell. 44 Benton Road 

1 Dorothea Shay, 68 Mt. Pleasant Street 



SANFORD HANSCOM SCHOOL 

Webster and Rush Streets 

Florence A. Chaney, Master, 49 Boston Street 

4 Mrs. Agnes M. Travis, 66 Bartlett Street, Maiden 

4 Maude A. Nichols, 78 Oxford Street 

3 Jennie M. Twiss, 67 Berkeley Street 

3 Frances E. Robinson, 97 Glen Street 

3 Mrs. Nellie W. McPheters, 163 Summer Street 

2 Martha L. Littlefield, 163 Summer Street 

2 Florence M. Shaw, 58 Central Street 

1 Ethel H. Werner, 59 Cedar Street 

1 Marion A. Viets, 122 Dale Street, Waltham 

1 Alice M. Saben, 11 Prospect Hill Avenue 

Kdgn. Elizabeth J. Baker, 19 West Cedar Street, Boston 

Asst. Mrs. Dorothv C. Huddy, 41 Hillside Ter., Belmont 1250 



1500 


1893 
1922 


1500 


1922 


1500 


1898 


1500 


1889 


1450 


191? 


1500 


1917 


1200 


1920 





1919 


$1650 


1908 


1500 


1906 


1500 


1903 


1500 


1908 


1500 


1914 


1500 


1897 


1500 


1909 


1300 


1919 


1500. 


1912 


1500 


1903 


1400 


1907 


1250 


1921 



Grade. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 43& 

TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1923. — Continued. 

Name and Residence. 

CLARK BENNETT SCHOOL 

Began 
Poplar and Maple Streets Salary Service 



John Sherburne Emerson, Master, 3 Preston Road $3000 1894 

5 Kate B. Gifford, 125 Pleasant Street, Arlington 1650 1902 

5 Ruth B. Brown, 110 Perkins Street 1200 1922 

4 Eliza I. Patterson, 110 Perkins Street 1500 1919 

4:3 Eugenia Carver, 110 Perkins Street 1400 1922 

3 Mrs. Katherine D. Millen, 22 Lovell Street 1400 1920 

2 Marie L. Wieczorek, 65 Mt. Auburn St., Cambridge 1500 1922 

2 Sarah L. Wolfe, 121 Morrison Avenue 1000 1922 

1 Mrs. Cora B. Gowen, 87 St. Stephen Street, Boston 1500 190C 

1 Alice M. Hayes, 81 Benton Road 1500 1913 

1 Elvira Badaracco, 1874 Beacon Street, Brookline 1000 1922 

Kdgn. Helen E. Harrington, 1675 Mass. Ave., Cambridge 1400 1912 

Asst. Mary B. White, 13 Day Street, Cambridge 1000 1921 



GEORGE L. BAXTER SCHOOL 
Bolton Street 

Francis A. Ryan, Master, 12 Bowdoin St., Arlington 1919 

4 Mary G. Blackwell, 45 Ibbetson Street $1600 1900 

3 Margaret M„ Breen, 461 Somerville Avenue 1500 1916 

2 Sue A. Pitzpatrick. 451-A Somerville Avenue 1500 1912 

1 Maria D. MteLeod, 78 Larchwood Drive, Cambridge 1500 1906 

Kdgn. Eleanor A. Connor, 86 Belmont Street 1400 1903 

Asst. Margaret McCarthy, 38 Highland Avenue 900 1922 



OREN S. KNAPP SCHOOL 
Concord Avenue 

Francis A. Ryan, Master. 12 Bowdoin St., Arlington $3000 1913 

6 Winifred I. Macdonald, 43 Babcock Street, Brookline 1500 1917 

6 Ellen C. Moynihan, 67 Avon Street 1500 1919 

6 Mary T. McCarthy, 246 School Street 1450 1919 

5 Etta R. Holden, 29 Warren Avenue 1500 1908 

5 Eleanor M. Lundgren, 93 Lowden Avenue 1500 1919 

4 Marguerite G. Stanton, 60 Ossipee Road 1300 1922 

3 Agnes C. Riley, 451 Somerville Avenue 1500 1918 

3:2 Mary E. Keefe, 99 Summer Street 1400 1922 

2 Alice A. Tassinari, 94 Beacon Street 1450 1919' 

1 M. Edith Callahan, Woburn 1500 191L 



ALBION A. PERRY SCHOOL 

Washington Street, near Dane Street 

Francis A. Ryan, Master, 12 Bowdoin St., Arlington 1919 

5 Catherine E. Sweeney, 48 Everett Street, Arlington $1600 1901 

4 Mary A. Mullin, Canton, Mass. 1500 1910 

3 Irene Vincent, 47 Vinal Avenue 1500 1903 

2 Mrs. Sarah E. Murphy, 87 Bristol Road 1500 1906 

1 Grace R. O'Neil, 347 Washington Street 1500 1913 



434 ANNUAL REPORTS 

TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1923. — Continued. 

Name and Residence. 
CHARLES G. POPE SCHOOL 

Washington and Boston Streets 



Grade. 



Florence A. Chaney, Master, 49 Boston Street 

6 M. Abbie Tarbett, 11 Washington Street, Stoneham 

6 Harriet M. Clark, 10 Vernon Street, West Medford 

6 Margaret V. Lamb, 34 Crescent Street 

5 • Eva E. Perkins, 16 Buckminster Street, Allston 

5:4 Annie G. Sheridan, 43 Highland Road 

4 Lizzie W. Parkhurst, 146 Highland Avenue 

f3 Irma J. Knight, 175 Pearl Street 

3:2 M. Katherine Davis, 243-A Highland Avenue 

2 Eunice S. Higgins, 25 Berkeley Street 

2 Florence E. Locke, 34 Dana Street, Cambridge 

1 Josephine Lacy, 63 Cherry Street 

1 Alice B. Frye, 105 Summer Street, Maiden 





Began 


Salary Service 


$2800 


1892 


1650 


1906 


1500 


1893 


1300 


1922 


1500 


1911 


1500 


1886 


1500 


1885 


1200 


1922 


1500 


1901 


1100 


1921 


1500 


1899 


1300 


1921 


1500 


1904 



f Temporary Teacher 

(JOHN A.) CUMMINGS SCHOOL 
School Street, near Highland Avenue 

Charles G. Ham, Master, Watertown $ 1919 

4 Fannie L. Gwynne, 65 School Street 1600 1886 

3 Katherine M. Fox, 150 Franklin Street, Stoneham 1500 1896 

2 Elizabeth L. Hersey, 96 Oxford Street 1500 1896 

1 Mrs. Stella M. Hadley, 11 Greene Street 1500 1914 

(JOHN G.) EDGERLY SCHOOL 
Cross and Bonair Streets 

Charles E. Brainard, Master, 82 Munroe Street $3000 1889 

6 Edith M. Snell, 4 Vine Street, Melrose 1650 1900 

6 Mary E. Richardson, 26 Oxford Street 1500 1893 

6 Annie L. Dimpsey, Hotel Woodbridge 1500 1891 

6 Isabelle M. Gray, 25 Webster Street 1500 1897 

5 Mabel C. Mansfield, 26 Oxford Street 1500 1893 
5 G. Hortense Pentecost, 157 Walnut Street 1500 1905 

•5 Berta M. Burnett, 51 Fresh Pond Park'y, Cambridge 1500 1915 

5 Mrs. Harriette W. Bridges, 8 Plympton St., Cam. 1500 1922 

5 Mrs. Myrtle I. Martin, 41 Putnam Street 1500 1916 

4 Mrs. Louise S. Weare, 65 Hancock Street, Boston 1500 1896 

3 Eleanor W. Nolan, 16 Farrington Avenue, Allston 1500 1922 

2 Alice W. Cunningham, 62 Highland Avenue 1500 1901 
1 Martha M. Power, 37 Gleason Street, W. Medford 1500 1890 



• leave of absence 

(JACOB T.) GLINES SCHOOL 
Jaques Street, near Grant Street 

Charles E. Brainard, Master, 82 Munroe Street $ 1919 

6 Margaret A. Orr, 146 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston 1650 1890 

6 Harriet F . Ward, Weymouth 1500 1895 

5 Alice C. Blodgett, Hotel Hemenway, Boston 1500 1937 

5 Monira C. Gregory, 110 Perkins Street 1400 1921 

4 Laura M. Flynn, 57 Franklin Street 1200 1920 

4 Mrs. Carrie Armitage, 57 Madison Street 1500 1899 

3 Florence E. Baxter, 42 Highland Avenue 1500 1891 

3 Cora J. Demond, 146 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston 1500 1900 

2 Elizabeth C Sullivan, 74 Ossipee Road 1200 1920 

2 Mrs. Florence S. Fowler, 109 Highland Avenue 1500 1915 

2. 1 Editha A. Sharkey, 7 Wesley Park 1450 1919 

1 Helen P. Colley, 872 Broadway 1400 1921 

1 Isabel J. Tifft, 109 Highland Avenue 1500 1892 

Kdgn. Ida M. Kane, 28 Fellsway West 1400 1905 

Asst. Marjorie Gustin, 3 Virginia Street 1000 1921 



Grade. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 435 



TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1923. — Continued. 

Name and Residence. 

(CHARLES) FORSTER SCHOOL. 

Began 
Sycamore Street and Evergreen Avenue Salary Service 



Frank W. Seabury, Master, 18 Winslow Avenue $ 1911 

6, 5 Elizabeth F. Clement, 29 Kidder Avenue 1500 1884 

5, 4 Annie S. Gage, 32 Marshall Street 1500 1881 

3, 2 Carrie T. Lincoln, &5 Ashland Street, Medford 1500 1892 

2, 1 Grace Shorey, 23 Forster Street 1500 189i 



(NORMAN W.) BINGHAM SCHOOL. 

Lowell Street, near Vernon Street 

Harry F. Hathaway, Master, 29 Albion Street 

6 Elizabeth J. O'Neil, 82 Benton Road 

6 Anna G. Molloy, 82 Benton Road 

6, 5 Jane Batson, 12 Washington Place, Maiden 

5 Clara L. Griffiths, 39 Ames Street 

5 Helen F. Wise/nan, Groton, Mass. 

4 Anna R. Canfleid, 205 Cedar Street 

4 Alice A. Griffiths, 39 Ames Street 

4, 3 Barbara E. Drummey, 43 Short St., Marlboro 

3 Lillian F. Commins, 16 Buena Vista Park, Cam. 

: 3 Lynda V. Merrill, 26 Brastow Avenue 

^ 2 fMrs. Elizabeth K. Miller, 78 Liberty Avenue 

2 M. Gertrude McCarthy, 36 Brastow Avenue 
2, 1 Ethel F Rudd, 46-A Franklin Street 

1 iMabel E. Mansir, 77 Albion Street 

1 Frances Fisher, 176 Williams Avenue, East Lynn 
Kdgn. M. Regina Desmond, 3 Oak Street, Charlestown 

Asst. Marguerite Driscoll, 396 Medford Street 



$3000 


1890 


1650 


1894 


1400 


1921 


1500 


1900 


1500 


1902 


1400 


1922 


1500 


1914 


1500 


1920 


1500 


1918 


1500 


1914 


1500 


1912 


1200 


1921 


1450 


1917 


1100 


1921 


1500 


1894 


1500 


1921 


1350 


1918 


1100 


1921 



f Temporary Teacher 



MARTIN W. CARR SCHOOL. 

Atherton Street 

Chas. G. Ham, Master, 20 Washburn St., Watertown $3000 

6 Eva S. Bent, 6 Steeves Circle 

6 Susie L. Luce, 22 Francesca Avenue 

6, 5 .Mrs. Hazel F. Quinn, 981 Main St., Winchester 

6 Mrs. Helen M. Mason, 62 Ibbetson Street 

5 Lillian E. Haskell, 41 Putnam Street 

5 Elizabeth S. Foster, 53 Laurel Street 

5 Dorothy Lundgren, 93 Lowden Avenue 

4 Alice M. Cumming, 117 School Street 

4 Mrs. Ada C. Mawhinney, 25 Walnut Street 

3 (Margaret M. Brennan, 30 School Street 

3 Bessie I. Berry, 38 Wyllis Avenue, Everett 

2 Annie B. Russell, 14 Kidder Avenue 

2 Mary E. Flanley, 9 Avon Street, Wakefield 

1 Frances E. Welch, 303 Highland Avenue 

1 Mabel R. Ingham, 62 Central Street 



13000 


1898 


1650 


1915 


1500 


1891. 


1500 


1915 


1450 


1920 


1500 


1913 


1500 


1895 


1450 


1915 


1450 


1917 


1500 


1919 


1450 


1917 


1500 


1915 


1500 


1901 


1500 


1915 


1500 


1908 


1500 


1912 



436 ANNUAL REPORTS 

TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1923. — Continued. 

Name and Residence. 
(ENOCH R.) MORSE SCHOOL 

Summer and Craigie Streets 
Grade. 

Mina J. Wendell, Master, 211 -A Summer Street 
6 Mrs. Harriette C. Hamilton, 36 Meacham Road 
5 Lennie W. Bartlett, 49 Laurel Street 
5 Blanche E. Thompson, 33 Hudson Street 

4 *Mrs. Sarah K. Lake, 199 Prospect St., Cambridge 
4, 3 Eva A. Wilson, 153 Lowell Street 

3 . Mrs. Agues C. Rice, 34 Highland Avenue 
2 Edna M. Scriven, 108 Summer Street 
2 Lena Munroe, 211-A Summer Street 
1 Mrs. Helen T. Smith, 43 Paulina Street 
1 Louise P. Deady, 84 Bay State Avenue 
Kdgn. Gertrude Prichard, 5 Webster Street 
Asst. Elizabeth White, 6 Boxford Street, Lawrence 





Began 


Salary Service 


$3000 


1882 


1650 


1900 


1500 


1893 


1500 


1906 


1400 


1921 


1500 


1917 


1500 


1900 


1000 


1922 


1500 


1913 


1500 


1912 


1450 


1917 


1300 


1920 


1000 


1921 



• Temporary Teacher. 



GEORGE O. PROCTOR SCHOOL 
Hudson Street 

Harry F. Hathaway, Master, 29 Albion St. 

6 Nora F. Byard, 27 College Avenue 

S, 5 Alice G. Hosmer, 42 Boston Street 

5, 4 Ethel F. Morang, 18 Curtis Avenue 

4 Mrs. Nettie L. Fay, 15 Pleasant Avenue 

3 Edith L. Hunnewell, 41 Mason Street 

3, 2 *Mrs. E. Laurette Johnston, 25 Tufts Street 

2 Mary S. Richardson, 347 Boston Avenue, Medford 

1 Lucia Alger, 163 Summer Street 



$ 


1912 


1650 


1884 


1500 


1906 


1450 


1920 


1500 


1901 


1500 


1894 


1400 


1922 


1500 


1906 


1500 


1889 



• Temporary Teacher. 



GEORGE W. DURELL SCHOOL 
Beacon and Kent Streets 

Charles G. Ham, Master, Watertown $.• 1919 

4 Abigail P. Hazelton, 14 Billingham Street 1600 1902 

3 Grace E. Packard, 12 Carlisle Street, Roxbury 1500 1912 

2 Mary Winslow, 106 Hammond Street, Cambridge 1500 1887 

1 Alice M. Dicker, 82 Marion Street, East Boston 1500 1912 



MARK F. BURNS SCHOOL 
Cherry Street, near Highland Avenue 

Mina J. Wendell, Master, 211-A Summer Street $...,.... 1919 

4 Mrs. Margaret D. Quarrie, 21 Bay State Avenue 1650 1909 

4 Lizzie E. Hill, 121 St. Stephen St., Boston 1500 1890 

3 Annie L. Brown, 4 Saginaw Avenue, N. Cambridge 1500 1885 

3 Margaret Beattie, 401 Washington Street 1500 1914 

2 Mary E. Lacy, 63 Cherry Street 1500 1890 

2 Ardelle Abbott, 71 Craigie Street 1500 1896 

1 Alice E. Morang, 18 Curtis Avenue 1500 1893 

1 Ruth E. Andrews, 113 North Street 1500 1917 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 437 

TABLE 29. — Teachers, in Service January, 1923. — Continued. 

Name and Residence. 

BENJAMIN G. BROWN SCHOOL. 

Began 

Willow Avenue and Josephine Avenue Salary Service- 



Grade 



Geo. I. Bowden, Master, 92 Monument St., W. Med. $3000 190S 

6 Mrs. Maud A. Bottomley, 10 Avon St., Cambridge 1650 191S 

5 Mary T. Ford, 32 Central Road 1500 1911 

5 Annie Sanburn, 11 East Newton Street, Boston 1500 1906 

4 Anna N. Johnson, 33 Everett Avenue 1500 1913 

4 Martha R. Taylor, 26 Simpson Avenue 1500 1914 

3 Helen L. Galvin, 1185 Commonwealth Ave., Allston 1500 1903 

2 Alice M. Dorman, 159 Morrison Avenue . 1500 1903 

2 Mrs. Grace H. Bliss, 33 Whitfield Road 1500 1900 

1 Mrs. Bessie T. Ma'cCutcheon, 72 Mt. Vernon St. 1500 1915 

1 Olivia H. Norcross, Wilmington 1500 1914 



HIGHLAND SCHOOL. 

Highland Avenue and Grove Street 

Harlan P. Knight, Master, 22 Hamilton Road $ 1919 

6 Grace M. Clark, 10 Vernon Street, West Medford 1650 1893 

6 Mary H. Joyce, 62 Highland Avenue 1500 1891 

6 Eva M. Barrows, 1 Glover Circle 1500 1903 

6 Marion Allen, 74 Collins Street, Danvers 1500 1911 

5 Catherine A. Burden, 50 College Avenue 1500 1902 

5 Hazel M. Stone, 12 Henry Avenue 1500 1919 

5 Beatrice Waterhouse, 153 Lowell Street 1500 1921 



S. NEWTON CUTLER SCHOOL 

Powder House Boulevard, near Raymond Avenue 

Harlan P. Knight, Master, 22 Hamilton Road 

6 Bernice J. Andrews, 10 Locke S»treet, No. Camb. 

6 Mrs. Minnie R. Lougee, 125 Walnut Street 

6 Ella H. Bucknam, 170 Powder House Boulevard 

6 Mrs. Mabel T. Totman, 163 Summer Street 

5 Mildred A. Whitman, 16 Chester Street, Danvers 

5 Bessie J. Baker, 19 Mills Street, Maiden 

5 Mabel Worcester, 24 Brastow Avenue 

5 Alice A. Libbey, 20 Chandler Street 

4 Mrs. Elva A. Cutler, 36 Powder House Blvd. 

4 Mrs. M. Eunice Byrne, 6 Myrtle Street, Winchester 1500 

4 Mrs. Katie L. Harmon, 1092 Broadway 

3 Mrs. Elsie M. Guthrie, 50 Bromfield Road 

3 E. Mildred Milner, 2 Billingham Street 

3, 2 Mrs. Nettie M. Humiston, 43 Fairmount Avenue 

2 Almena J. Mansir, 77 Albion Street 

2 Stella Bucknam. 319 Highland Avenue 

1 Annie H. Hall, 170 Powder House Boulevard 

1 Mary L. McKenna, 294 Lowell Street 

1 Eleanor E. Waldron, 135 Powder House Boulevard 

Kdgn. Mrs. Dorothea G. Lamb, 20 Curtis Street 

Asst. Willa E. Wingate, 92 Brooks Street, Brighton 



LINCOLN SCHOOL 
Broadway near Teele Square 

Harlan P. Knight, Master, 22 Hamilton Road $ 1914 

3 Eliza H. Lunt, 50 Curtis Street 1600 1889 

4 Mrs. Lillian M. Wentworth, 248 Highland Avenue 1500 1911 
2 Olevia M. Woods, 116 Powder House Boulevard 1500 1908 
1 Hortense F. Small, 91 Electric Avenue 1500 1912 



$3000 


1897 


1650 


1914 


1500 


1922 


1500 


1897 


1500 


1893 


1500 


1920 


1500 


1905 


1450 


1919 


1450 


1919 


1500 


1911 


1500 


1912 


1500 


1916 


1500 


1919 


1450 


1920 


1450 


192$ 


1500 


1899 


1200 


1917 


1500 


1906 


1500 


1915 


1200 


1919 


1450 


1521 


900 


1922 



438 ANNUAL REPORTS 

TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1923. — Continued. 

MARTHA PERRY LOWE SCHOOL. 
Morrison Avenue near Grove Street 

Geo. I. Bowden, Master, 92 Monument SL, W. Med. $ 1917 

4 May E. Small, 104 Orchard Street 1650 1900 

4 Stella M. Holland, 34 Francesca Avenue 1500 1903 

3 Maude C. Valentine, 1098 Broadway 1500 1901 

3 Mrs. Jane M. Taaffe, 159 Morrison Avenue 1500 1888 

2 Katherine E. Hourahan, 94 College Avenue 1500 1892 

2 Clara G. Hegan, 100 School Street 1500 1897 

1 Octavia A. Stewart, 15 Kenwood Street 1500 1917 

1 Selena G. Wilson, 11 Irving Street 1200 1922 

EVENING SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 

Everett W. Tuttle, High $7.00 

John S<. Emerson, Bell 6.00 

Charles E. Brainard, Western 6.00 

CADET TEACHERS 

Alice M. McFarland, 19 Prospect Street $600 1922 

Mildred M. Harkins, 318 Beacon Street 600 

Gladys M. H. Sullivan, 40 Pearson Avenue 600 

Hazel L. Smith, 15 Victoria Street 600 

Mildred Dewire, 384 Washington Street 600 

Ida Paly, 82 Concord Avenue 600 

Margaret Burke, 1 Pearl Street 600 

M. Helen Campbell, 22 Barton Street 600 

Eleanor V. Nemser, 25 Walker Street 600 

Mary E. O' Shaughnessy , 76 Derby Street 600 

SUPERVISORS AND SPECIAL. TEACHERS 

Music 

12, 7 James P. McVey, 5 Dinnaean Street, Cambridge $2500 1915 
6, 1 Mrs. Charlotte D. Lawton, 121 St. Stephen St., 

Boston 1900 1898 

Drawing 

6, 1 Clara M. Gale, 21 Willoughby Street $1900 1911 

Stewing 

Mary H. Brown, Supervisor, 162 Highland Avenue *200 1913 

ft, 5 Mary L. Boyd, 74 Heath Street 1500 1888 

6, 5 Mrs. Emma J. Ellis, 54 Marshall Street 1500 1900 

6, 5 JMartha S. Walker, 80 Brookside Ave., Newtonville $1100 1921 

Penmanship 

9, 1 Ruth L. Whitehouse, 21 College Avenue 1700 1915 

Manual Training 

Harry L. Jones, Supervisor, 137 Powder Hse. Blvd. $200 1911 

Physical Instruction 

12, 1 JErnst Hermann, 12 Columbus Place, W. Newton 1550 1914 

12, 7 Arthur R. Ayer, 48 Highland Avenue 2500 1921 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 439 



TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1923. — Continued. 

Atypical 

iMary A. Holt, 13 Pleasant Avenue 1550 1910 

Mrs. Bertha M. Morton, 62 Highland Avenue 1550 1913 

Julia M. 'Riordan, 165 Albion Street 1550 1914 



Sight Saving 
Mrs. Amy F. Woodbury 1550 1917 

* Additional to salary as Director of Household Arts Courses 
t Additional to salary as Principal of Boys' Vocational "School 
j Part time 



Table 30— OFFICERS, ETC., IN SERVICE JANUARY, 1523 

Name and Address 

SUPERINTENDENT AND SECRETARY 

Salary 

Charles S. Clark, 75 Munroe Street $5000 

CLERKS 

Mary A. Clark, 42 Highland Avenue 1400 

Mildred A. Merrill, 26 Cambria Street 1250 

H. Madeline Kodad, 104 Sharon Street, W. Medford 1150 

Marlon E. Marshall, 30 Gilman Street $19.00 per_week 

Ruth O. Elliott, 4 Liricoln Place 17.50 per week 

Beatrice M. Hersom, 142 Lowell Street 14.00 per week 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 

Benjamin R. Jones, 25 Loring Street 1800 



440 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



TABLE 31.— SCHOOL JANITORS, JANUARY, 1923 









Weekly 


School. 


Name 


Residence. 


Salary 


High School, assistant 


Jeremiah M. Brennan 482 Medford St. 


$26.00 


High School, assistant 


John N. Quirk 


202 Somerville Ave. 


25.00 


High School, assistant 


Joseph McCormack 


206 Washington SL 


25.00 


High School, assistant 


Charles Hoyt 


18 Trull St. 


30.00 


High School, assistant 


Thomas G. Pullen 


6 Madison St. 


25.00 


Eastern Junior High 


James J. Quirk 


216-B Medford St. 


27.50 


Prtescott 


Thomas E. Dickinson 5 Berkeley St. 


28.50 


Hanscom . 


Charles F. Rose 


15 Brastow Ave. 


26.50 


Boys' Vocational 


Charles B. Kelley 


25 Clark St. 


26.00 


Bennett 


Michael Mullaney 


Greene St. 


28.00 


Baxter 


Jeremiah Sullivan 


60 Newton St. 


24.00 


Knapp 


Maurice T. Mullins 


13 Fremont Ave. 


28.50 


Perry 


Dan'l E. Cunningham 


i 15 Leland St. 


24.00 


Pope 


John J. Kilty 


9 Morton St. 


28.00 


Southern Junior High 


William Meskill 


19 Aldersey St. 


30.00 


Southern Junior High 


Nicholas J. Lacey 


327 Washington St. 


30.00 


Cummings 


Lewis G. Keene 


1 Prescott St. 


22.00 


Edgerly 


Charles P. Horton 


26 Everett Ave 


28.00 


Glines 


Roy C. Burckes 


20 Jaques St. 


29.00 


Forster 


George W. Coomhs 


216 Pearl St. 


28.00 


Northern Junior High 


Michael A. Mullin 


16 Bowdoin St. 


27.50 


Bingham 


John F. O'Brien 


335 Lowell St. 


31.00 


Carr 


John H. Lane 


5-A Belmont St. 


34.00 


Morse 


John "W. Cremen 


69 Oxford St. 


28.50 


Proctor 


James F. Flynn 


31 Linden St. 


25.50 


Durell 


Ellsworth C. Lundgren 93 Lowden Ave. 


22.00 


Burns 


Charles J. Elkins 


14 Holyoke Road 


25.50 


Brown 


James J. Cooper 


105 Willow Ave. 


26.50 


Highland 


Frank C. Martis 


79 Flint St. 


28.00 


Hodgkins 


George A. Givan 


17 Henry Ave. 


29.00 


'Western Junior Hisrh 


James T. Eddy 


34 Wallace St. 


34.00 


Cutler 


Daniel Campbell 


22 Barton St. 


28.00 


Cutler 


Walter F. Burns 


23 Avon St. 


25.00 


Lincoln 


John T. Morey 


1 Weston Ave. 


22.00 


Lowe 


Frank H. Flagg 


22 Clyde St. 


25.50 



ELECTRIC LINES AND LIGHTS. 441 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF ELECTRIC 
LINES AND LIGHTS. 



Somerville, Mass., 

January 1, 1923. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen of 
the Gity of Somerville. 

Gentlemen : — 

I most respectfully submit my fourteenth annual report 
as Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights for the year 
ending December 31, 1922. 

Inspection of Wiring in Buildings. 

This year has been the busiest in the history of this 
department as the number of installations of electric work 
and inspections of the same have greatly increased over any 
previous year. 

The large number of old houses and the increased num- 
ber of new buildings which have been wired for light and 
power has made the past year one of unusual activity. 

A thorough inspection of all new work has been made 
and the work as a whole shows improvement. 

The inspection of old installations which should be fol- 
lowed up more closely has been neglected to a certain extent 
owing to lack of time and assistance. 

A number of old installations have been found defective 
and have been repaired or re-wired to conform to present day 
requirements. 

No doubt there are a great many old buildings where 
the wiring is not up to the standard and should be over- 
hauled. 

Considerable of this unapproved wiring has been found 
put in by unauthorized persons and notifications have been 
sent to the owners of the premises to have same removed, 
which has been done in most cases. 

Appliances of all kinds both approved and unapproved 
appear on the market from time to time and are bought and 
attached to house wiring by the consumer without any 
thought as to the danger resulting from the use of such de- 



442 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

vices. Not only is the building wiring overloaded but the 
protective fuses are often changed from the original ones to 
those of larger capacity, and which endangers the entire in- 
stallation. 

Flat irons, washing machines, stoves and heaters should 
be run on separate circuits and not attached to lighting fix- 
tures. 



Number of notifications of new work . 
Number of inspections of new wbrk . 
Number of re-inspections of new work 
Number of inspections of old work . 
Number of defective installations of old work 
Number of defective installations remedied 
Number of re-inspections of old work 



2400 

3458 

227 

50 

8 

7 

10 

Total number of inspections . ... 3745 

Number of permits issued to the Edison Electric 
Illuminating Co. for installing meters, lamps, 

etc 3742 

Number of permits issued to the Maiden Electric 

Co 1 



Fire Alarm System. 

The Fire Alarm System is in excellent condition. 
Owing to the absence of heavy ice storms like those of last 
year the overhead wires of the system have suffered very little 
damage. 

Most of the old storage batteries have been replaced by 
new and the balance will be changed this year. 

278 bell alarms have been received and transmitted dur- 
ing the year. 

678 telephone calls for fire were received and fire de- 
partment sent. 

5 A. D. T. alarms were received and transmitted. 

The central office equipment consists of the following: 

2 — 6 circuit operating boards. 

1 — 5 circuit tapper board. 

1 — 5 circuit gong board. 

2 — 16 circuit storage battery charging boards. 
1 — 32 circuit protector board. 

1 — 12 circuit automatic repeater. 

1 — dial, 4 number manual transmitter. 

2 — 5 circuit punching registers. 

13 punching registers and take up reels. 

2 automatic time and date stamps. 
1 master clock. 

940 cells storage battery. 

5 — 10 foot, 4-shelf battery racks. 

4 metropolitan tappers and 2 gongs. 



ELECTRIC LINES AND LIGHTS. 443 

The apparatus outside the central office consists of the 
following : 

131 signal boxes. 

7 tower strikers. 
45 gongs. 

10 punching registers. 
20 Tappers. 
1 automatic steam whistle. 

8 private telephones. 

About 60 miles of overhead wires. 
About 78 miles of underground wires. 

2800 feet of new overhead wire has been rum and 2386 
feet of underground cable was installed in Cross Street. 



& 



Police Signal System. 

The Police Signal System which was installed 10 years 
ago begins to show signs of wear and some of the apparatus 
will have to be replaced. Very little trouble has been found 
with signal boxes and service has not often been interrupted. 

The system consists of the following : 

1 — 4 circuit police desk. 

59 street signal boxes. 

4 special boxes. 

About 19 V2 miles of overhead wires. 

About 13 miles of underground wires. 



Supervision of Poles and Wires on the Streets. 

The same attention lias been given to the condition of 
poles and wires on the streets as in previous years. A number 
of defective poles have been replaced by companies owning 
same. 

New poles have been placed in locations granted for the 
purpose of applying lighting and telephone service and aban- 
doned poles have been removed. 

New Re- Re- Re- 

poles placed moved set 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Company 6 21 1 6 

Edison Electric Illuminating Company 56 56 13 

Boston Elevated Railway Company . 21 

Postal Telegraph Company ... 1 

Permits given to the New England 

Tel. & Tel. Co., for attachments 

to the Edison Company's poles 310 

Permits given to the Edison Electric 

111. Co. for attachments to the New 

England Tel. & Tel. Company's 

poles ...... 89 



444 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Street Lighting. 

The matter of street lighting has had the same attention 
as in previous years and additional lights have been placed 
in various parts of the City. ' 

More lights are required in the western part of the city 
as some new streets are inadequately lighted. 

Additional spot lights have been installed at places 
where traffic officers are posted and are of great assistance to 
them. . 

The new "white way" system of lights has been in- 
stalled in Union Square and vicinity. 

The number of Street lights January 1, 1923 are as fol- 
lows : 

152 Magnetite lights. 
380 — 600 C. P. lights. 
128 — 125 C. P. lights. 
946— 60 C. P. lights. 



Recommendation. 

I respectfully recommend that an assistant inspector 
be employed to enable the department to more thoroughly 
cover all new and old installations of electrical wiring in the 
City. This is imperative as the work cannot be done by one 
man. 



Conclusion. 

i 
I wish to thank His Honor, the Mayor, the members of 

the Board of Aldermen and the several departments for the 

manv courtesies received. 



Respectfully yours, 

Walter I. Fuller, 
Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights. 



LICENSE COMMISSION. 445 



REPORT OF THE LICENSE COMMISSION. 

To His Honor the Mayor , 
Dear Sir : — 

The License Commission* respectfully begs leave to submit 
the following report to you and the people of our city of its 
engagements and activities during the year 1922. Nearly 
three years of close contact with the licensees of our city 
have brought to the members of the Commission a personal 
knowledge of our applicants and their locations. 

As a result of the vote at the last municipal election, all 
licenses, except Lord's Day and Licenses to sell Firearms re- 
verted to the Board of Aldermen in June, 1922. 

The Commission has carried out its policy this year as in 
the preceding two years of endeavoring to grant licenses that 
would be for the best interests of the community, and to pre- 
vent as far as possible an increase of licenses that might be 
questionable. 

It is impossible for this commission to grant all the Lord's 
Day licenses applied for without throwing our city wide open 
on Sunday and thus producing a situation not desired by our 
citizens. It would be advisable for those considering the 
leasing of stores and spending a considerable amount of money 
in fitting them up, largely in expectation of getting a Lord's 
Day License to consult with the commission before doing so. 

Applications for Common Victualers, Lord's Day, Lodging 
House, Inn Holders, Druggist and Automobile Dealers Li- 
censes were received and acted upon by the Commission as 
herein set forth : 

Common Victuallers. 

62 Applications Received. 
57 Licenses Granted. 

5 Applications Transferred. 
Licenses Transferred. 

2 Licenses Revoked. 

Lord's Day. 

236 Applications Received. 

216 Licenses Granted. 

20 Applications Rejected. 

4 Licenses Transferred (Location) 



446 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Lodging House. 



37 Applications Received. 
35 Licenses Granted. 
2 Applications Rejected. 



Inn Holders. 

2 Licenses Granted. 

Automobile Dealers' Licenses. 

34 Applications Received. 
34 Licenses Granted. 

Applications Rejected. 

Applications Transferred. 

Licenses Revoked. 

Third Class Liquor Licenses. 
15 Licenses Granted. 



The following is the financial statement of the receipts 
and expenditures of the Commission for the year 1922. 



Receipts. 

Appropriation from City Government $500 00 

Fees from Licenses Issued . . . . . . . 2,133 00 

$2,633 00 
Expenditures. 
Salaries of Assistants . . . . $400 00 

Supplies and Postage 71 85 

$471 85 471 85 

Balance $2,161 15 

Net Revenue. 

Fees Received $2,133 00 

Cost of Administration . 471 85 

Net Revenue $1,661 15 



Respectfully submitted, 



Eugene M. Carman 
Wm. H. Smith 
Wm. J. Shanahan 



INDEX. 



City Auditor, Report of . 
Balance Sheet . 
Cash Statement 
Taxes — Special Assessments 
Departmental Bills . 
Water Departmental Accounts 
Statement of Estimated Revenue 
Appropriations .... 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
County of Middlesex 
Revenue and Expenses 
Temporary Loans 
Taxes 

Funded Debt 

Maturities on Funded Debt 
Interest Requirements on Funded Debt 
Borrowing Capacity .... 
Abatements, Refunds, State Income Tax 
Overlay Accounts 
Excess and Deficiency Account 
Receipts and Expenditures, Classification 
Schedule of Public Property 



City Clerk, Report of 
Receipts 

Payments .... 
Licenses and Permits 
Births .... 

Marriages .... 
Deaths .... 
Assessed Polls and Registered 
Elections .... 
Liquor License Question . 
Ordinances 



Voters 



, Etc 



of 






3 

4 

6 

8 

9 

10 

11 

14 

23 

24 

24 

25 

27 

26, 29 

31, 32 

30, 31, 32 

33 

34, 35, 36 

36, 37 

37 

38 

71 

229 
229 
231 
232 
232 
233 
234 
235 
236 
241 
242 



City Engineer, Report of . ... 

Engineering Department 

City Engineer Division, Classification of Expenses 
Streets Accepted as Public Ways in 1922 

Street Bounds 

Table of Street Construction . 

Sewer Division 

Sewers and Storm Drains Constructed 

Maintenance Account 

Parks and Playgrounds Division . 

Maintenance Account 

Public and Private Streets 



144 
144 
145 
148 
149 
150 
155 
156 
157 
160 
161 
166 



448 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



City Government and Officers for 1922 



244 



City Solicitor, Report of 



300 



City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes, Report of 
Condensed Cash Statement .... 

Taxes 

Street Sprinkling and Moth Assessments 
Overlay and Abatement ..... 
Reserve Supplementary Assessments 
Betterment Assessments 
Departmental Accounts . . 

Temporary Loans 

Bonds 

Borrowing Capacity 

Memorandum of Payments on account of Debt 

Grade Crossing Debt 

Treasury Department 



87, 88, 



74 
75 
81 
82 
83 
83 
84 
85 
86 
89 
90 
91 
92 
92 



Commissioner of Public Buildings (see Public Buildings 
Commissioner) 

Commissioner of Streets (see Street Commissioner) . 

Commissioner of Water (see Water Commissioner) . 



190 
131 
251 



Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights, Report of 
Inspection of Wiring in Buildings 
Fire Alarm System . 
Police Signal System 

Supervision of Poles and Wires on the Streets 
Street Lighting 
Recommendations 
Conclusion .... 



Fire Department, Chief of, Report of 
Alarms of Fire . 
List of Probable Causes 
Manual Force 
Apparatus . 
Horses 
Hose . 
Resume 

Recommendations 
Conclusion 

Health, Board of, Report of 
Organization, Officers, etc. 
Nuisances . 
Permits and Licenses 
Stables 

Board of Infants 
Deaths 

Mortality Statistics . 
Diseases Dangerous to Public Health 



441 
441 
442 
443 
443 
444 
444 
444 

179 
179 
179 
183 
183 
183 
183 
184 
187 
187 

203 
202 
203 
203 
204 
205 
205, 209 
206 
211 



INtfBX. 



449 



Specimens and Supplies . 
Medical Inspection of Schools 
Bacteriological Department 
Undertakers 

Examination of Plumbers 
Health Nurses, Report of 
Medical Inspection, Report of 
Inspector of Animals and Provisions 
Inspector of Milk and Vinegar 



211 
212 
214 
214 
214 
214, 216 
218 
221 
225 



Inspector of Animals and Provisions, Report of . 



221 



Inspector of Buildings (see Public Buildings Commissioner) 
Inspector of Milk and Vinegar, Report of the 

Examinations, table of 

City Physician, Report of . 

Law Department, Report of 

License Commission, Report of 



190 
225 

226 

119 
300 
445 



Medical Inspection, Report of 

Visits 

Contagious Disease Hospital . 
Laboratory Examinations 
Tuberculosis .... 
Infant Hygiene Clinics . 



218 
218 
218 
218 
219 
220 



Ordinances 



242 



Overseers of the Poor, Report of ... 

Members of the Board, Committees, Officers, etc. 

Report of General Agent . 

Full Support .... 

Partial Support 

Aid Under 1913 Law (Mothers' Aid) 

Cost to City .... 

Reimbursements 

Somerville Hospital 

Population and Gross Expenditures 

Overseers of the Poor Since 1885 

Recapitulation 

City Home, Report of Warden 

City Physician, Report of 



Planning Board, Report of 
Fire Districts . 
Public Parks and Buildings 
Mystic River Development 
Appropriation . 
Survey of city 
Revision of Building Laws 



114 

113 
115 
115 
115 
115 
115 
116 
116 
116 
117 
Itt 
118 
119 

302 

302 
302 
303 
305 
304 
305 



450 



ANNUAL RBPOBTS. 



Police, Chief of, Report of ... 

Arrests 

Crimes and Offenses Against the Person 

Crimes and Offenses Against Property . 

Crimes and Offenses Against Public Order 

Recapitulation . 

Roster of Department 

Changes in the Force 

Liquor Officers, Report of 

Police Matron, Report of 

Conclusion 



120 
120 
120 
121 
121 
122 
126 
127 
129 
129 
130 



Poor Department (see Overseers of the Poor) 



114 



Population 116, 241 

Public Buildings Commissioner, Report of . . . . 190 

Inspection of Buildings 190 

Coal 192 

' ' Elevators 193 

School Buildings 193 

Fire Department Buildings ...... 198 

Municipal Buildings 199 

Libraries . . 199 

Water, Highway, Sanitary and Sewer Buildings . . 199. 

Hospital Buildings 200 

Police Buildings 200 

Bath House 200 

Park Buildings 201 

In General 201 



Public Grounds (City Engineer) . 



160 



Public Library 

Board of Trustees and Officers — Committees 
Organization of Library and Staff Personnel 

Report of Trustees 

Report of Librarian 

Statistics 



93 

93 
94 

97 
98 



Public Welfare and Recreation Commission 



282 



Sanitary Department, Report of . 
Collection of Ashes and Paper 
Departmental Revenue 

School Department .... 
Superintendent of Schools, Report of 

Americanization .... 

Appendix, Contents of 

Atypical classes .... 

Accommodations .... 

Cost of Schools .... 



188 
188 
188 



307 
310 
331 
379 
333 
340 
381 



INDHX. 



451 



Dental Dispensary 377 

Expenditures for fiscal year 385 

Graduates — High school 411 

Junior High schools 417 

Vocational schools 426 

High School Athletic Association 368 

Junior High Schools 317 

Membership . . . . 310 

Report of Head Master, High School . ... 323 

." Principal, Vocational school for Boys . . . 346 
Director of the Continuation Schools and 

Americanization Work 348 

" Report of Principal of the Evening High school 354 

Report of the Director of Household Arts . . 357 

School Committee, 1922 308 

School Nurses ' . . 377 

Somerville Teachers' Association 367 

Somerville Teachers' Club 368 

Statement showing distribution High School Pupils . 364 

Teachers in Service 405, 428 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, Report of . . . . 298 

Sewers (see City Engineer) 155 

Street Commissioner, Report of . . . . /\ 131 

Appropriations 131 

Highway Maintenance 132 

Underground Wires 134 

Snow and Ice 133 

Bridges 133 

Crushed Stone . . . . . . . . 134 

Steam Rollers 134 

Sidewalks Maintenance . 134 

Street Sprinkling 135 

Street Cleaning ........ 135 

Suppression of Moths .... . 136 

Shade Trees 136 

Highways Construction, New Streets .... 137 

Streets Constructed in 1922 138 

Sidewalks Construction 139 f 140 

Highways Construction, Permanent Pavement . . ' 139 

Reconstruction and Resurfacing 139, 141 

Miscellaneous ' 142 

Labor 142 

Recommendations . ....... 143 

Public and Private Streets .* 166 

Support of Poor Department (see Overseers of the Poor) . 113 

Water Commissioner, Report of 251 

Revenue and Expenditures [ 253 

Cost of Water Works 254 

Water Works Income and Distribution '. \ 25S 



452 . ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Water Distribution System, Construction . . . 255 

Hydrants, Gates, etc. . 256 

Water Services 257 

Water Meters 258 

Summary of Pipes and Fixtures ..... 260 

Water Assessments and Consumption .... 260 

Construction, Maintenance, Operation .... 262 

Class of Premises covered by service installation . . 262 

Pitometer Survey 265 

Street Mains, Gates, Hydrants, etc 270 

Summary of Statistics . 280 

Financial Statistics 281 



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